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Replacement for Rukl Moon Atlas

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#1 tfield98

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 11:34 AM

A few months ago, I read a review in S&T about a new book that competes with Rukl. (It's easy to compete with Rukl on price, since, being out of print, the cheapest used one is listed on Amazon for $198.)

I tried to buy this new book a few months ago when I read about it, but it was not yet available.

I've forgotten its name Can anyone tell me the name of this new book?

Has anyone gotten a chance to look at one? Any reviews?

Tom

#2 Lindhard

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Posted 05 October 2013 - 05:42 PM

Maybe this one?


http://lpod.wikispac...las of the Moon

#3 Astrojensen

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Posted 06 October 2013 - 05:09 AM

Looks like a great visual atlas.


Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

#4 tfield98

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Posted 09 October 2013 - 07:36 PM

I've contacted the publisher, West Virginia University Press, who told me the book will be back in print later this month. You can order it from here: http://wvupressonlin..._9781938228803.

This book got great reviews in Sky & Telescope a few months back.

Tom

PS And, no, although I am a vendor, I'm not hawking anything I sell. I just know there is a built-up demand for a replacement for Rukl and this books seems to be a promising candidate.

#5 Doc Willie

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 10:22 AM

I've contacted the publisher, West Virginia University Press, who told me the book will be back in print later this month.


I hope they do a new edition. There was a pageful of mistakes, mostly mis-labelling, in the original edition.

Even with the mistakes, it has become my most used lunar observation guide. And I own a copy of Rukl.

#6 Rick Woods

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 11:06 AM

The 21st Century Atlas is a beautiful work; but it's not a replacement for the Rukl atlas. Rather, it's an excellent supplement, with an atlas full of absolutely incredible photos taken from lunar orbit. Where it's lacking is:
1) Not very much labeling;
2) The pictures are very high contrast, and a bit of detail is lost in black shadow;
3) Not much explanatory text.

It's a wonderful book; just not a replacement for Rukl.

#7 photonovore

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Posted 10 October 2013 - 11:44 AM

I agree with Rick. A hardcopy atlas has one primary purpose and that is to define location of institutionally identified features/locations (IAU in the instant case) as broadly and accurately as possible, thereby enabling standardized and unambiguous *locational referencing*. So, ideally, all the named features plus all the lettered features would be identified and for this Rukl's is the most available (print) source (based upon number copies in circulation). "Have you ever noticed the XYZ just SW of Cleomedes F?" -- Rukl's is what will locate (for reference or observation) what is being discussed. It remains a unique resource (outside of some obscure and rather outdated NASA atlases.)

BTW, you *can* get the early 90's Kalmbach editions of Rukl's for under 50$ and this older edition remains eminently useful for locational referencing.

#8 Rick Woods

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 04:30 PM

Since we're talking about the 21st Century Atlas:

On page 96, the full page farside image, there is what appears to be a huge, seemingly very old basin just to the left and slightly south of Mare Moscoviense, with the words "Buys-Ballot" just about in the middle of the feature. There is no reference to this feature in the atlas, but it looks like the biggest basin on the farside, excluding the South Pole-Aitkin.

Anyone know anything about this feature?

#9 gfeulner

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 05:37 PM

I ordered mine from Amazon a couple of days ago. Gerry

#10 Rick Woods

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 08:49 PM

Since we're talking about the 21st Century Atlas:

On page 96, the full page farside image, there is what appears to be a huge, seemingly very old basin just to the left and slightly south of Mare Moscoviense, with the words "Buys-Ballot" just about in the middle of the feature. There is no reference to this feature in the atlas, but it looks like the biggest basin on the farside, excluding the South Pole-Aitkin.

Anyone know anything about this feature?


I emailed Mr. Wood with this question, and he said:

That is the Freundlich-Sharnov basin:
http://www.lpod.org/...Basins_LTVT.JPG
and more here:
http://the-moon.wiki...-Sharanov basin



#11 Rick Woods

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 12:21 PM

Ah jeez, it just occurred to me to look at my S&T topo moon globe. There it is, bigger than life, Freundlich-Sharnov. Sheesh! :foreheadslap:
The second link above says it's basin-hood isn't certain; but on the globe it sure as heck looks like one to me.

#12 Traveler

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 12:27 PM

Click this link for information about an updated Rukl atlas.

#13 starbux

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Posted 15 October 2013 - 03:34 PM

That is good news, even if it isn't in English (yet).

#14 photonovore

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Posted 16 October 2013 - 11:26 AM

http://planetcarto.w...dition-rukls...

Wouldn't hold my breath, sad to say... referring to the two new editions (hungarian and german language)

"The reason why this is the last authorized edition is that Antonín Rükl does not want a new one. He regards this work as one belonging more to the 20th Century and would like to have it a completed project. The end of an era."

#15 Greyhaven

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Posted 16 October 2013 - 01:07 PM

Mardi, I can't help it, but publishing an atlas to replace Rukles' is like re-making Cosmos; make it bigger, make it better and don't compare it to what came before. Let us decide, what compares with what.
Be Well
Grey

#16 revans

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Posted 16 October 2013 - 04:26 PM

I think that the Times Atlas of the Moon is still available through Amazon. Used copies go for around $40 (I think). I used to use this Atlas a lot until I switched to the Rukl Atlas. The layout of this Atlas is similar to Rukl.






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