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Horse Head Nebula @ 90X Real-Time video thru IIE

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#1 jdbastro

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 02:13 AM

It's alittle fuzzy but the basic structure is pretty obvious. This shows the Horse Head at 90X in real-time (well, actually 2fps, but close enough). Equipment used: Gen 3 thin-film image intensifier, Tak Mewlon 250 @ f9.2, 12nm H-alpha filter, Panasonic GH3 camera. Shot from Mount Pinos, Calif.

Horse Head Nebula Real-Time Video Link

Here's a still at 20 sec exposure, 200 ISO:

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#2 nytecam

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 02:42 AM

These EOD images of yours are always stunning :bow: How much does Mount Pinos - Calif skies contribute to these results and how does it perform under severe LP?

#3 PEterW

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 11:14 AM

Wait for a few months and I'll tell you Maurice. Horsey is small so you need a reasonable focal length to see more that a tiny notch. Ic434 is pretty bright as is the flame. Transparency is a key factor regardless of light pollution, one night good the next awful. The Rosetta is nice as is barnards loop.

Cheers

Peter

#4 nytecam

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 12:05 PM

Wait for a few months and I'll tell you Maurice. Horsey is small so you need a reasonable focal length to see more that a tiny notch. Ic434 is pretty bright as is the flame. Transparency is a key factor regardless of light pollution, one night good the next awful. The Rosetta is nice as is barnards loop. Cheers Peter

Great Peter - any pics :question: I need pics ;)

#5 jdbastro

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 03:54 PM

These EOD images of yours are always stunning :bow: How much does Mount Pinos - Calif skies contribute to these results and how does it perform under severe LP?


The Mount Pinos location is fairly dark (Blue zone, I think) and the altitude is 8300 feet. It is a well known, often used location for astrophotographers.

By contrast, my Los Angeles suburb residence has an altitude of 100 feet and is well buried in light pollution. I took this 8 sec pic of the Horse Head last January. Compared to the Mount Pinos shot, this one is very washed out. In this case the scope was the same (except that it was at f12), the image is reversed due to a star diagonal (prism type), and the camera was a Panasonic G5:

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#6 Digital Don

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Posted 12 October 2013 - 08:52 PM

... and I'll tell you Maurice Horsey is small so you need a reasonable focal length to see more that a tiny notch...

Cheers

Peter


It's interesting that you should mention that that! One of the most fascinating things I found using my MallinCam is the relative sizes of various objects when seen at a fixed magnification.

Using eyepieces, we tend to use different magnifications to optimize the view of the particular object we're observing. However, with the MallinCam I typically don't use the zoom function so everything I observe is at the same magnification.

Here are a a few examples. The Ring Nebula is very small compared to The Dumbbell Nebula. The Lagoon, The Swan, The Eagle and even The Trifid are quite large. NGC 253 is huge, and very impressive I might add! M 31 is much to large to fit into the field of view I get with my setup

I'd say The Horsehead is roughly the same size as the brighter portion of M 27. It's actually much bigger than I was expecting, and the the background nebula (IC 434) extends well beyond the field of my setup.

Neat stuff to be sure!

Don:usa:

#7 nytecam

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 03:43 AM

Thanks - still a great HH from LA suburbia :bow: to think that eyeballing this object is near impossible with extremely few sightings reported and then using every trick in the book :o....well that why I and others do brief exposure imaging like my efinder shot below :grin:

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#8 PEterW

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Posted 13 October 2013 - 02:24 PM

No pics, only got phone can, no relay lens jobs. Will try next time. The crescent and propellor are also readily visible, but need focal length to see detail.

Petet

#9 mpgxsvcd

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 08:11 AM

Probably my favorite one of your images and videos. The Horse Head is a tough one and you are getting it in record time. Keep posting.






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