Jump to content


Photo

Viewing the moon

  • Please log in to reply
25 replies to this topic

#1 ve1drg  Happy Birthday!

ve1drg

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 6
  • Joined: 15 Oct 2013
  • Loc: Florida

Posted 16 October 2013 - 05:55 PM

Wondering if most people use filters of any sort when viewing the moon.
I have discovered that the moon is very bright and perhaps a filter might calm that brightness down. And possibly might even enhance the view?

#2 maugi88

maugi88

    Postasaurusrex

  • -----
  • Posts: 3332
  • Joined: 25 Aug 2013
  • Loc: SE MN

Posted 16 October 2013 - 06:03 PM

I use a polarizing filter while looking at the moon. Hurts my eyes otherwise.

#3 csrlice12

csrlice12

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 10789
  • Joined: 22 May 2012
  • Loc: Denver, CO

Posted 16 October 2013 - 06:42 PM

Nope, and my filter has never seen an eyepiece.

#4 star drop

star drop

    contra contrail

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 71055
  • Joined: 02 Feb 2008
  • Loc: Snow Plop, WNY

Posted 16 October 2013 - 07:07 PM

Hi Ted and welcome to Cloudy Nights. I prefer to view the moon without a filter.

#5 RobertED

RobertED

    Gemini

  • *****
  • Posts: 3199
  • Joined: 11 Jul 2003
  • Loc: Smithfield, RI

Posted 16 October 2013 - 07:24 PM

I too prefer NO filters!!! :shameonyou:

#6 Skylook123

Skylook123

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 7491
  • Joined: 30 Apr 2005
  • Loc: Tucson, AZ

Posted 16 October 2013 - 08:42 PM

I have a filter, but I use it on Jupiter - helps the contrast a lot.

#7 RussL

RussL

    Music Maker

  • *****
  • Posts: 3114
  • Joined: 18 Mar 2008
  • Loc: Cayce and Lancaster, SC

Posted 17 October 2013 - 10:56 AM

Try sunglasses (uh...moonglasses?). They work if you have enough eye relief.

[EDIT: don't let the nieghbors see ya with 'em on at night, though, LOL :cool:].

#8 dce21b

dce21b

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 76
  • Joined: 12 Sep 2013

Posted 17 October 2013 - 03:54 PM

I dunno how you guys do it. I have a 16" lb and though I still look at moon the next purchase I make will be a variable filter. When I look away from eyepiece I'm straight blinded.

#9 maugi88

maugi88

    Postasaurusrex

  • -----
  • Posts: 3332
  • Joined: 25 Aug 2013
  • Loc: SE MN

Posted 17 October 2013 - 07:40 PM

I dunno how you guys do it. I have a 16" lb and though I still look at moon the next purchase I make will be a variable filter. When I look away from eyepiece I'm straight blinded.


I too cant look at the moon through my 12 acf without a filter or I will be blind. It is way too bright.

#10 Billytk

Billytk

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1335
  • Joined: 22 Apr 2012
  • Loc: Geneva, Fl.

Posted 17 October 2013 - 07:47 PM

Someone just posted in the beginners forum about a variable polorizing moon filter on sale for dirt cheap. At $18 you really can't go wrong.

#11 Jon Isaacs

Jon Isaacs

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 43848
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2004
  • Loc: San Diego and Boulevard, CA

Posted 17 October 2013 - 08:26 PM

I dunno how you guys do it. I have a 16" lb and though I still look at moon the next purchase I make will be a variable filter. When I look away from eyepiece I'm straight blinded.


That is a good thing..

Dark adaptation is counter productive when observing brighter objects like the moon. Ideally you are viewing the moon with your cones (color vision) which provides you with greater resolution. Your rods are desirable for viewing dim objects but with your rods you lose color vision and resolution.

One trick planetary observers use is to keep some lights on so that the eye does not dark adapt.

Jon

#12 woodscavenger

woodscavenger

    Messenger

  • -----
  • Posts: 450
  • Joined: 20 Aug 2013
  • Loc: Boise, ID

Posted 18 October 2013 - 12:08 AM

My Dob cover has a smallish 2" hole for off axis viewing. When the moon is up and I am using low power I put the cover on and pop the 2 inch hole open. Gives just enough dimness but no real loss of detail at that power. When I crank up the power I take of the cover completely for more light. works well for me.

#13 RussL

RussL

    Music Maker

  • *****
  • Posts: 3114
  • Joined: 18 Mar 2008
  • Loc: Cayce and Lancaster, SC

Posted 18 October 2013 - 06:56 AM

I dunno how you guys do it. I have a 16" lb and though I still look at moon the next purchase I make will be a variable filter. When I look away from eyepiece I'm straight blinded.




That is a good thing..

Dark adaptation is counter productive when observing brighter objects like the moon. Ideally you are viewing the moon with your cones (color vision) which provides you with greater resolution. Your rods are desirable for viewing dim objects but with your rods you lose color vision and resolution.

One trick planetary observers use is to keep some lights on so that the eye does not dark adapt.

Jon



Good info, John. It's like how I enjoy viewing the moon before full dark, when possible.

#14 csrlice12

csrlice12

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 10789
  • Joined: 22 May 2012
  • Loc: Denver, CO

Posted 18 October 2013 - 07:22 AM

"Good info, John. It's like how I enjoy viewing the moon before full dark, when possible."

Same here. Especially if the moon is setting early in the evening, then when it gets dark, I switch over to planetary or DSO viewing (although I have done some planetary before sunset as well). I have a VP filter, and it has never even seen an eyepiece. Bought it early on and found I didn't need it..

#15 CharlesW

CharlesW

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1294
  • Joined: 01 Nov 2012
  • Loc: Chula Vista & Indio, CA

Posted 18 October 2013 - 09:48 AM

I got used to no filter. Nothing wrong with just looking at the moon for an evening. All the other DSO stuff will still be there tomorrow.

#16 AngryHandyman

AngryHandyman

    Messenger

  • -----
  • Posts: 438
  • Joined: 27 Jun 2013
  • Loc: Nanaimo, BC

Posted 18 October 2013 - 10:09 AM

I enjoy viewing the moon a lot and almost always use a moon filter as my eye are fairly sensitive. I squint in the day without sunglasses and my eyes often start to tear up when I view without a filter and have a hard time relaxing my eye. Regular eye checks and my eyes are healthy, just sensitive. It certainly doesn't hurt to try and see how it affects your viewing comfort.

#17 Rick Woods

Rick Woods

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 14565
  • Joined: 27 Jan 2005
  • Loc: Inner Solar System

Posted 18 October 2013 - 12:23 PM

Someone just posted in the beginners forum about a variable polorizing moon filter on sale for dirt cheap. At $18 you really can't go wrong.


Oh yes you can! If the filter is a POS, that's just 18 clams out the window.

#18 A6Q6

A6Q6

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 796
  • Joined: 31 May 2011
  • Loc: Stroudsburg,Pa,U.S.A

Posted 18 October 2013 - 01:05 PM

Hi Ted, I have an Orion filter wheel that I can use on my Quantum 6, It works great, and was fun for a while, but on a 6" telescope the image for me isn't too bright once I get the power up over 250. Bino viewing also lowers the brightness and can give very relaxing views.

Attached Files



#19 northernontario

northernontario

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1130
  • Joined: 01 Jul 2009
  • Loc: Porcupine, Ontario Canada

Posted 18 October 2013 - 05:16 PM

I have a Meade Series 4000 Green No. 11 that I have been using for years. It is my favourite.

I use the Antares No. 13 when the moon is more than 3/4s. Some times.

When I view with my 6 inch refactor, no filter required. :grin:

But seriously, give the green number 11 a try.

jake

#20 DTH

DTH

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 111
  • Joined: 11 Aug 2013
  • Loc: Georgia

Posted 20 October 2013 - 02:55 AM

I use a variable polarizing filter when the moon is between half and full, otherwise it is too bright for me. Even if the moon is the only object I plan on viewing for the evening, I will still use the filter. I hate moon blindness--hehe.

#21 REC

REC

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5128
  • Joined: 20 Oct 2010
  • Loc: NC

Posted 20 October 2013 - 01:19 PM

Baader Moon and Sky Glow filter.

#22 rnc39560

rnc39560

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1786
  • Joined: 23 Jul 2013
  • Loc: MS coast

Posted 20 October 2013 - 01:41 PM

I too enjoy the views of the moon before sunset! Then I switch my observation to DSO and planets well after dark.

#23 tecmage

tecmage

    Mercury-Atlas

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 2509
  • Joined: 13 Jan 2010
  • Loc: Glenview, IL

Posted 20 October 2013 - 04:03 PM

I sometimes use a variable polarized filter.

#24 GeneT

GeneT

    Ely Kid

  • *****
  • Posts: 12696
  • Joined: 07 Nov 2008
  • Loc: South Texas

Posted 20 October 2013 - 04:49 PM

I can have migraine issues, and looking at a 3/4 moon or more without a filter can initiate a headache. I use both neutral density and polarizing filters on a bright moon. Both work quite well. If you can stand viewing without a filter, then I recommend you don't use one.

#25 Starlon

Starlon

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 243
  • Joined: 17 Apr 2006
  • Loc: desert, USA

Posted 20 October 2013 - 11:48 PM

Wondering if most people use filters of any sort when viewing the moon.
I have discovered that the moon is very bright and perhaps a filter might calm that brightness down. And possibly might even enhance the view?


Yes - it is bright! And you can use all that light to your advantage. When you're observing the Moon between 1st Q and full, the addition of white lights suppresses the eyes' tendency to dark adapt at night and, in fact, causes the eye to use normal type scotopic vision, which is of much higher quality than dark-adapted photopic vision.

I do it & sit comfortably in a light room (observatory) with a cuppa joe & my Rukl's Moon Atlas on the table.




Some good info: http://www.visualexp...ightvision.html

http://www.kirchdorf.../beginner4.html






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics