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V411 Tau ... Other rapid pulsators?

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#1 MtnGoat

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Posted 18 October 2013 - 11:25 PM

The Meade 10" SCT is out cooling down and I'm about to head out to track this puppy down and see if I can record an hour of pulsations, which should be about five cycles. Supposedly it has a 12.5 minute period and a range of about a magnitude. That should be obvious enough when imaged.

Anyone know of any other similar objects or a list of them with very fast periods and decent ranges?

I know the delta scutis are fast too but low amplitude. There's another star in Aquarius with an 88 minute cycle if I recall correctly, but it skims my treeline. V411 goes nearly straight over me so that will be a clear shot.

#2 Astrodj

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 01:15 AM

I see from a wiki that the period itself may vary from about 6 to 22 minutes as opposed to a solid 12.5 so be aware of that...

At mag 14-15 it would be tough visually (impossible from where I view for me). It does sound interesting though. The period is so short that it could be included in a very dark sky trip with modest apertures without taking up the whole night, lol. I was not aware of the ZZ Ceti class of variable. Thanks for the post.

#3 MtnGoat

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 11:18 AM

Yes I went and dug up a light curve on it, due to multiple pulsation modes it can be more than 12 min between high peaks. sometimes there are multiple minor peaklets before another high one. It's beyond the range of my visual equipment until I return my 16" to service, but a DSI on the Meade should easily pick it up in a few seconds. A 30 second shot reaches to about mag 15-16, easy (with F5 reducer!)

I got sidetracked last nite and didn't get out there, but tonight I'm going to make sure I take a run at it.

ZZ Ceti class, huh. OK that gives me some info for more digging. I like the idea of the fast ones...instant gratification!

v411 curve

#4 agmakr

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Posted 19 October 2013 - 02:27 PM

Hi, i hope i am not highjacking the thread,
but i would also welcome suggestions on short period variables.

I use a C9.25 at f/6.3 with an Atik 314L and would like to target a star that would allow me to get a lightcurve (my first) within one night.

Thanks,
Angelos

#5 MtnGoat

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Posted 20 October 2013 - 09:51 AM

The more the merrier, a general discussion is what my goal was!

Here's another I alluded to earlier, 88 minute period 0.8 mag range

CY aquarii

#6 MtnGoat

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Posted 21 October 2013 - 01:09 PM

So I've tried twice now to at least hit the location of V411. Sat night and last nite. I dial in the co-ords on my LXD75, get no recognizable stars compared to my AAVSO charts. I dial up Aldebaran, it lands me with Aldebaran smack in the middle. Select V411 again, back to the same spot.

Maybe the moon is blowing out so many stars due to proximity I'm not getting everything I should. By eyeball, this makes some sense, but the camera should punch through a bit better and even on a 20 sec run I'm not seeing anything comparable to the charts.

I used the co-ords from AAVSO, and when I type them into Google Sky I get the same stars on the charts. It's particularly vexing because the 1 deg chart I made shows a wicked bright (for our purposes) 6-7 mag star near the edge, and I see no such bright one anywhere near via eyeball and a wide angle eyepiece.

I guess I'll upload a shot to the plate solver site and see where the heck I'm actually pointed, I'm a bit mystified. It's got to be something stupid, but it's sure confusing!

Done some more googling on this class of star and I'm not finding much else as good for instant satisfaction at a reasonable magnitude range. All the rest have a range of tenths or hundredths of a magnitude.

#7 nytecam

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 02:16 AM

Thanks for listing these two rapid VS - they're within my scope's imaging range and my attention span ! :-) I can get down to mag 15 in a few seconds exp and a series will give me a chance to test the camera's s/ware interval timer maybe set at 1 min intervals to automate the sequence. :-)

#8 jgraham

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Posted 03 November 2013 - 08:10 AM

I've been setting up to take a peek at CY Aqr as it is in a great location right now. We just might get a clear night this evening. Poor transparency, but good enough to go after it with my camera. should be fun!

#9 MtnGoat

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 01:20 PM

Gratification measured in a couple hours as opposed to days, weeks, or months is a good thing!

#10 nytecam

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 05:35 AM

Got a shot [below] last night [and a brief sequence to look at sometime!] of V411 Tau [m14.1-15.3; p=12.5min] - the field is strangely absent of stars for the Milky Way and assume this star peeps through or is in front of a dark nebula :o

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#11 nytecam

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 06:07 AM

Here's CY Aqr from last night [m10.42-11.2; p=88min] - took an automated sequence and abandoned scope to indoors! eg 4s exp @ 3m internals for ~30min - OK only 1/3 full period but may catch something interesting :grin:

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#12 MtnGoat

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 10:46 AM

Boy that's an odd color on CY

#13 nytecam

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 03:39 PM

Boy that's an odd color on CY

What colour would you like ??? Chat is cheap - at least I got a piccy or two :p

#14 jgraham

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 09:17 PM

Ack! I finally got a series of 12 images of CY Aqr over an hour period before the clouds rolled in. Unfortunately, I misunderstood a new command that I haven't used before in Autostar Image Processing and promptly deleted them all! Double ack! Oh well, I should get another shot at this tomorrow night.

#15 groz

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Posted 08 November 2013 - 11:14 PM

for 'one night gratification' on a light curve, I use GSC 3074-0114 if it's within the window for the evening. I dont have a copy of the light curve handy, but, it can be seen here:-

http://s37.photobuck...tCurve.jpg.html

Almost a magnitude from peak to peak, over a period less than a couple of hours. Great for 'instant gratification' or testing a new equipment configuration.

Altho it's circumpolar for us, at this time of year, very low in the north, so light curve quality will be poor because it's so low.

#16 MtnGoat

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Posted 09 November 2013 - 06:49 PM

That's looks like a fun one, on the list it goes!

Bummer about CY, jg!

#17 groz

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Posted 09 November 2013 - 10:13 PM

I like this one, because at the time of year star parties happen in this part of the world, it's well placed. It's a great target for an first introduction to photometry. folks can start taking frames shortly after dark, and see a light curve with both peaks before the evening is done.

#18 NJScope

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Posted 15 November 2013 - 08:04 AM

MtnGoat:

I compiled a list of very rapid variable stars from the GCVS website. The limiting parameters are those stars brighter than mag 15 that change by 0.1 mag or greater within a 4 hour period of time. These are posted as a favorite (#37) link in my observatory website.






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