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M31 satellites M32 & M110

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#1 nytecam

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Posted 09 November 2013 - 02:17 PM

I'm unsure if the two bright satellite gxys of M31 get observed but here's my recent pics of this pair starting with M110 below.

I've used Robert Gendler's fine image to ID some of M31 globulars in the field and amazingly a faint and very distant mag 15.1 [=Sloan DSS] through M31's edge ringed in red below M110 :rainbow:

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#2 nytecam

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Posted 09 November 2013 - 02:19 PM

Here's the brighter and more compact satellite M32 again with some of M31's globulars ringed in blue - hope these pics are of interest :rainbow:

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#3 Asbytec

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 01:03 AM

Observing globluars from another galaxy. Are you kidding? That's unreal... :)

Have you seen this?
http://www.cloudynig...hp?item_id=1559

#4 nytecam

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 02:20 AM

Observing globluars from another galaxy. Are you kidding? That's unreal... :) Have you seen this?
http://www.cloudynig...hp?item_id=1559

Thanks for that - I didn't know what were the brightest globulars in M31 etc were but that list is great for some precise future targets :rainbow:

#5 kt4hx

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Posted 10 November 2013 - 06:01 AM

Thanks for the pics, very interesting indeed! I have seen G1 with my Z10, from both Bortle 2 skies and my Bortle 5 backyard. Wasn't like it was an eye catcher, but I think the idea of seeing a globular belonging to another galaxy is reward enough for me.

#6 Ptarmigan

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Posted 12 November 2013 - 10:09 PM

There are plenty of globular clusters near the Milky Way. Why image globular clusters near the Andromeda Galaxy? ;) :lol:

Great images! :cool: :bow:

#7 nytecam

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 04:53 AM

There are plenty of globular clusters near the Milky Way. Why image globular clusters near the Andromeda Galaxy? ;) :lol: Great images! :cool: :bow:

Thanks - the challenge :grin:

Here's a bright star-forming region in M31 arm in NGC 206 - discovered by William Herschel with a 3" 'scope [=Wikipedia] :o So must be a target for everyone on the forum ;)

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#8 IVM

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 10:41 AM

Maurice, I don't see it in the Wikipedia article on NGC 206 that it was discovered with a 3" scope, nor anywhere else I looked. Where did you see this size? Barnard rediscovered it with a 5", but the original observation seemed to be with Herschel's 18". There are no special remarks as to the discovery aperture in Herschel's 1789 publication, or in Steinicke's book, and HCNGC says 18".

#9 Astrojensen

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 10:55 AM

Well, it *can* be seen in a 3", but it's not exactly easy. Herschel's 18", on the other hand, was as capable as a modern 12" and in such a scope, NGC 206 is pretty easy under dark skies. I lean towards it being discovered with the 18".


Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

#10 blb

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Posted 17 November 2013 - 12:26 PM

...discovered by William Herschel with a 3" 'scope

The NGC/IC web page has it as discovered by Friedrich Wilhelm Herschel (1738 - 1822), the Year of Discovery was 1786 with his 18.7-inch Reflector Telescope. Nothing about a 3-inch refractor.

The Deep Sky Observer's Companion - the online database has

Synonyms: H V-036

Discovered in 1786 by William Herschel with an 18.7-inch f/13 speculum telescope. He called it "vF, vL, E nearly in the meridian or a little from np-sf, about 20' long."



#11 nytecam

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Posted 18 November 2013 - 01:37 PM

Well, it *can* be seen in a 3", but it's not exactly easy. Herschel's 18", on the other hand, was as capable as a modern 12" and in such a scope, NGC 206 is pretty easy under dark skies. I lean towards it being discovered with the 18". Clear skies! Thomas, Denmark

This would appear to be correct - can't find reference to 3" [scope?]. Didn't think I'd imagined it but did find here reference "....bright enough that William Herschel has given it a separate catalog number: H V.36 (based on his observation on October 17, 1786)." Sorry for the brief excitement :grin:






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