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Is aperture still king even during the day?

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#51 Pinewood

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Posted 11 January 2014 - 08:17 PM

many birders,
at least on BirdForum
seem to be going to 32mm binos

edj

Ed,

I represent that remark,
In fact, I am currently carrying two 8x32 glasses for bird watching: 6.5x32 and a 10x32. When I carry only one, it is an 8x32.

Happy observing,
Arthur

#52 azure1961p

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Posted 23 April 2014 - 07:51 PM

I'm really late to this thread but ill weigh in. Many people would agree a 70mm refractor is a nice spotting scope aperture but believe it or not as a spotter - my 6" sct beats its handedly. Higher resolution is clearly evident as well as better color saturation for the same powers.

The 70mm is a more practical scope for spotting and its done the lions share but the C6 is a true performer when Ive taken it out - and Ive done the side by side comparisons.

Ill give one memorable example in the comparo that defines the differences well...

At 200 yards I had the 70mm focused sharply on tree branch tips (no leaves) and it was crisp and sharp and every blue at 65x to 80x. Then I repeated the same magnifications and wow. The refractor view you could have sworn was like it was an overcast day. The tree branches were dark against the sky and even looked BACKLIT like they were silohetted. The C6 though turned those grey blue silohettes into SUNLIT twigs with honey and Hershey tones coming through and none of that achromatic blue.

I love the little refractor but it didnt have a chance!

At anyrate my own 2 cents here is -yes aperture matters but the conditions that really allow this attribute to play out can be too rarefied and cumbersome in all real word practicality and so often the 60-80mm refractor in one confit or another has the greater appeal. Take a big scope down to the sea on a cloudy damp day though and it breaks a lot of rules . Its just such a narrow corridor that makes it efficient in the face of so much impracticality. Memorable though.

Pete

#53 Rui Caratão

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Posted 27 April 2014 - 05:11 PM

just my 2cents on the subject based on my experience has a birder and a spotting scope user.

Atmospherical conditions are the limiting factor, but when they let you use mags above 50x, apperture is still king if the contenders have the same optical quality(correction and coatings), however if you have side by side a known High end 82mm spotter with a 100mm <500$ spotter the image (sharpness, contrast, resolution, flare) will be better with the well corrected 82mm, no question about that!

#54 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 04 June 2014 - 04:39 PM

I'm really late to this thread but ill weigh in. Many people would agree a 70mm refractor is a nice spotting scope aperture but believe it or not as a spotter - my 6" sct beats its handedly. Higher resolution is clearly evident as well as better color saturation for the same powers.



I have tried most of my scopes during the day including my 12.5 inch Newtonian. I never owned a C-6, only a C-5.. As a terrestrial scope, 70mm maybe on the small side, a 4 inch apo though is pretty tough to beat.. It might not quite have the aperture and through put but it's got better scatter control and fewer thermal issues and better optics..

Jon

#55 kozmik frakture

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 07:29 PM

I've gotten great views & photos with my 8" Schmidt-Cass. Especially of some Piliated Woodpecker fledgling in a nest cavity about 250 feet away and about 50 feet up. Not a very ruck friendly scope. I pack up my Lomo 95mm Mak, tripod & serval lenses and hit the trails. It has a very good close focus.

#56 moynihan

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 04:17 PM

Years ago when i had a C8 i tried it once during the day for watching a distant coyote pack. Nice views with significant heat distortion though (100x).

During mid a.m. to late afternoon, on a sunny day, the exit pupil of your eye stays at 2mm pretty much.
Nowdays, my primary day scopes are:

an old B&L Elite LER 60mm spotter with a fixed 22x occular. View seldom affected by ground heat.

A 65mm ED spotter with a 12mm occular for 33x, which seems to work the best during most conditions.

A post 2010 C90 @ 62x, for gray days and nest viewing. Heat distortion very apparent on a sunny day, with more distant targets.

I saw a visitor at a raptor migration site once, with a C8 on its fork :o
He seemed to be having problems, not having a hawk setting on the drive and all :tonofbricks:






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