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ISON will survive!

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#1 Glen A W

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 02:16 PM

They are claiming it's all over the the little comet that could, but I still believe it will make it around. That's my prediction.

#2 herrointment

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 02:49 PM

Well, you are a braver man than I.

#3 Glen A W

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 02:50 PM

:) I like to side with comets. They are so..... bipolar.....

#4 Tonk

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 02:56 PM

It may do - as a rubble pile - but with no volatiles left it will be invisible - thats my prediction

#5 Special Ed

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 03:13 PM

Maybe it should have been named ICARUS.

#6 Dave Mitsky

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 03:23 PM

It was just reported that SDO shows no sign of Comet ISON. Sadly, put a fork in it.

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#7 Happy-Idiot

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 03:31 PM

It's better to burn out than fade away.

#8 Tonk

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 03:57 PM

However something has come through :) thought its looks very unheathly cometwise.

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#9 boandpokey

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 04:00 PM

that's a dust pile with no volatility... will fade shortly.. but we are due for a good comet show its been too long

#10 Tonk

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 04:01 PM

Now Lovejoy go its tail ripped off at the same point but once some distance from the sun it regrew the tail .... then totally disrupted a day later.

#11 Tonk

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 04:05 PM

And this https://twitter.com/...8/photo/1/large

and ...

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#12 Glen A W

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 05:27 PM

That looks like it is more of the rubble. The thinner "tail" going in is almost exactly on the parabolic orbital path and was said to be large dust grains and debris. Perhaps the comet did disrupt. It is remarkable that it is marking its path so well!

#13 OldDeadOne

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 05:34 PM

I guess there is no hope of seeing a Halley's type comet again in my lifetime(I was mesmerized night after night just looking at it),and I was really hoping that ISON would be that comet,I'm totally crushed.

#14 Glen A W

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 05:39 PM

I guess there is no hope of seeing a Halley's type comet again in my lifetime(I was mesmerized night after night just looking at it),and I was really hoping that ISON would be that comet,I'm totally crushed.


You AND the comet, quite possibly. ;)

It was a great comet for me, on the way down to the horizon this past month. It showed a good, long tail and a green coma. What more could I want? This was the best tail I'd seen since Schwassman-Wachmann 3 B & C in 2006. I did miss McNaught, however. Pannstarrs was pretty good too, though I felt its tail was a bit of a fan.

The NASA coverage was a shame. These people are supposed to be scientists, but they were calling this very early based on nearly no data. The mere lack of visibility in the instrument they were using was not telling of much at all.

#15 Glen A W

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 05:45 PM

I still think it is too early to tell. Everyone should look at those pictures. The comet, disrupted or not, is marking its orbital path in a most amazing way.

#16 brianb11213

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 06:00 PM

The comet, disrupted or not, is marking its orbital path in a most amazing way.

It's just the dust from the shattered nucleus - there is no drag out there so the particles will tend to follow the original orbital trajectory. In fact there will be some reconcentration as the remnants move away as the leading particles will be slowed by gravity allowing the trailing particles to catch up. The various sizes of dust grain will be "sorted" by radiation pressure & more or less gradually diverge as well as being scattered by the residual motion from the nucleus's rotation. Dispersing and moving away from the sun, the remnants will fade rapidly. If we're very lucky there may be a few chunks large enough to be visible as faint telescopic objects on the way out - probably the second week in December is the best chance to see what is left.

Comet of the century? No ... hype of the century, well one hopes that the "popular" media will learn, but without much expectation.

#17 Tonk

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 06:04 PM

It is remarkable that it is marking its path so well!


At which point Newton gives a wry smile

#18 Glen A W

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 06:05 PM

It is remarkable that it is marking its path so well!


At which point Newton gives a wry smile


I thought just the same!

#19 Alan French

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 06:05 PM

The "Comet of the Century" label should be based only on performance, never on expectations. If it doesn't put on a fine show, clearly visible and easily found by anyone, sporting a long, bright tail, it should not qualify.

Clear skies, Alan

#20 Tonk

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 06:07 PM

I guess there is no hope of seeing a Halley's type comet again in my lifetime


Sounds like you missed Ikeya-Zhang and C/2006 P1 McNaught :( both recent and bright with tails

#21 Tonk

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 06:11 PM

well one hopes that the "popular" media will learn


Well its a mistake they like repeating.

When I was at uni in the late 70's anyone really struggling on the course and wanting to transfer was told to take up science journalism - go figure ;)

#22 Alan French

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 07:35 PM

It wasn't just the popular media. Some web sites devoted to space and astronomy were full of hyperbole too.

The popular media often resorts to hyperbole. It attracts readers, which means money, so they are unlikely to learn from this "mistake."

Clear skies, Alan

#23 kevin M13

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 07:45 PM

Just like the WC naming winer storms.

#24 LivingNDixie

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 08:44 PM

I think you folks are being pretty hard on the media. I think they were pretty fair, there was a lot of "if this" or "maybe." I would rather the media hype it and get people out there looking up then the opposite.... an impressive object/event that gets totally ignored.

#25 Dave M

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Posted 28 November 2013 - 08:54 PM

Science channel airs a special/program on 12/07 at 10pm EST called Super Comet. Just sayin :grin: I Guess now they will have to focus more on its probable demise, unfortunately.






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