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China Spacecraft to land on Moon Dec-14

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#1 echoes1961

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 11:31 AM

I find this very exciting! China will try and land a rover on the surface and feed back live video once there.

ABC news

This will be only the third rover from another country to land on the moon. The url link tells the rest of the story.

#2 Rick Woods

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 05:11 PM

Good for them! I'm glad to see someone taking an interest in the Moon again!

#3 echoes1961

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Posted 06 December 2013 - 06:49 PM

Exactly Rick....It's good to see some spacecraft's landing on the moon again, no matter what country does it. looking foreword to the work they do and live video feeds. Should be a good show. Hope they share most of it with us?

#4 Astrojensen

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Posted 07 December 2013 - 02:45 PM

Oh, they'll share it, no doubt. Hopefully, they'll do some interesting science.


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#5 azure1961p

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Posted 07 December 2013 - 10:46 PM

Exactly Rick....It's good to see some spacecraft's landing on the moon again, no matter what country does it. looking foreword to the work they do and live video feeds. Should be a good show. Hope they share most of it with us?


I agree - this is a great thing. I doubt they'll keep it a secret and it'll be more of a "look what we can do" kind of pride. The Rover is made by Synta by the way.

Pete
(Kidding)

#6 kcb

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 12:18 AM

hi, thanks for info, will keep an open ear for news on dec.14,kevin

#7 Astrojensen

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 03:16 AM

The Rover is made by Synta by the way.



Really? Well, they do have lots of experience with GOTO. Now they can truly say that their GOTO mounts can go to the Moon... ;) :grin:


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#8 azure1961p

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 04:53 AM

Now that'd be a selling point.

Pete

#9 Rick Woods

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 10:45 AM

The Rover is made by Synta by the way.



Really? Well, they do have lots of experience with GOTO. Now they can truly say that their GOTO mounts can go to the Moon... ;) :grin:


I wonder if it'll try to acquire the other rovers up there...

#10 echoes1961

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 10:35 PM

Ha ha...they just might, the other rovers were abandon in place or AIP...lol

I have a feeling they will find much more then any before on the moon on this journey! Wishful thinking perhaps.

Seinfeld's on...got to go.

#11 azure1961p

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Posted 08 December 2013 - 11:18 PM

I wish we were going back to the moon - even if it were robotic. The ISS is a long expensive yawn to me. I miss the magic of our early space program. Wish there were compelling enough reason to return but alas robotics and such is so much more feasible and long lasting.

Its no secret I miss the Apollo hoopla.

Ehhh.

Pete

#12 echoes1961

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 08:42 AM

Well said azure. I too miss the Apollo program. I remember one of the first things as a kid in the mid 60's was seeing the moon during the day time and thinking we are going to the moon. Everything was about space back then, we had space toys (major Matt Mason) and space food sticks and of course Tang. Plus tv shows like Lost in Space, Star Trek, The Jetson's,etc....Good times

If China wants to show off by sending robot rovers to the moon then that's okay with us, Because you're right, the ISS is old hat.

#13 azure1961p

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 07:48 PM

ISS - its as exciting as Skylab was . I get the philosophy of the reasoning behind the station but its such a dead issue to me. I think we all looked up back then at the moon different than kids today. It wasn't that long ago I recall reading about a teacher who didnt understand what causes phases to the moon.

Id love to come up with a great reason to go back to the moon - but none seem in the coming other than / hey lets make a lunar ISS. We know too much to invest the billions needed to pull off another moon program with any pay off at the other end . This time around we need more than so many rocks, great photos, Barbara Eden and so many TESTERS Saturn V models. Well that and the technology funneled into our ICBMs.

I wish we could invent a new imperative for the moon but I don't think its in the radar.

A pity.

Pete

#14 star drop

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 08:15 PM

The Chang'e-3 probe is in lunar orbit.

#15 seawolfe

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 08:12 AM

The ISS is a long expensive yawn to me.


You have to remember that in those times Apollo was "old hat" by the time Apollo 12 had landed. We had been there, done that.... By the time Apollo 15 was on it's way, NASA's ambitious budget was being gutted. Apollo 18 & 19 were cut, that left the Apollo / Soyuz and Skylab. People weren't even watching television coverage of Apollo missions by the time Apollo 16 was on the moon. When Apollo 17 was on the moon, there was hardly ANY television coverage. I believe that Viet Nam got more news. :p

#16 azure1961p

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 12:32 PM

Apollo 17 was actually paid programming by NASA it was so unpopular at that point. Soap Opera programming was actually airing simultaneously with the lunar telecasts. Its sad testament to a science- diiscovery numb pop culture.

Pete

#17 Tom and Beth

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 02:06 PM

Ahh yes. The Moon program. Back when making long range goals was not "square".

And yet, I for one still have that little boy in me that looks at the night sky with awe. Replaced my push along "Lunar Rover" toy scope with ...errrr....bigger toys.

#18 NeilMac

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 10:59 PM

Will look forward to any info provided when if they land.

#19 SaberScorpX

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Posted 13 December 2013 - 05:37 PM

here's the plan:

Landing in the Sinus Iridum (Bay of Rainbows) near 31.05° west, 43°.07 north.
The time is exactly one circuit of the Moon earlier than was indicated in Chinese news reports when Chang'e arrived. The change may have been driven by orbit dynamics in the intervening time.
Moonrise over eastern China is around 06:00 UTC so the Moon will be visible to tracking stations, including a mid-Pacific ship, for several hours prior to the event.
Chang'e will start from its 15 x 100 km, polar inclined orbit. About one hour before commencing the landing sequence, and while behind the Moon as seen from Earth, Chang'e will fire its engine to reduce periselene to 2km above Sinus Iridum.
Chang'e will approach the landing zone from the south and at perigee, final descent will begin using the throttleable 1500 - 7500 Newton engine. Landing will occur after a descent program lasting for 750 seconds.
It will hover for a few seconds 100 metres above the surface while an intelligent onboard system determines the safest touch-down point. The descent engine will switch off at 4 metres altitude and Chang'e will drop to the surface.
The lander is expected to operate for about 12 months on the Moon. Equipment includes a detector operating in the extreme ultra violet region of the spectrum capable of 'seeing' the glow caused by energetic particles in the Earth's ionosphere, and a 150mm astronomical telescope. http://www.zarya.info/Calendar.php

update: According to numerous Chinese news reports, Chang'e 3's landing on the Moon is now scheduled to begin at 21:40 Beijing time on December 14, which is 13:40 UT or 05:40 PT. That's about two hours earlier than previously stated.[/i]

mission animation: http://news.qq.com/a...1129/013396.htm

and possible live coverage link: http://english.cntv....p2p/index.shtml


peace,
stephen

#20 azure1961p

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Posted 13 December 2013 - 06:41 PM

The 150mm telescope is an onboard Nexstar 6SE

;)

Pete

#21 Astrojensen

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 03:24 AM

The 150mm telescope is an onboard Nexstar 6SE



Really?


Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

#22 mhilscher

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 07:36 AM

thank you stephen..great update

#23 Stellarfire

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 09:49 AM

Update - Chang'e-3 has landed.

The unmanned Chang'e-3 spacecraft successfully landed at just before 9.15pm Beijing time, according to Chinese state media. “It landed on the Moon,” state media announced in a live broadcast on Saturday night.

See here for the news in The Telegraph.

The Planetary Society shows first pictures & video frames (b/w and colour).
Landing location in Sinus Iridum is stated at 19.51° west, 44.12° north.

Congrats to China for soft touchdown on Moon!

Stephan

#24 btb

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 10:27 AM

It was interesting to watch.

#25 photonovore

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Posted 14 December 2013 - 01:19 PM

I'll be looking forward to the data they gather. (Oh, yeh...nevermind, they're Chinese, not NASA.)






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