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ISON in 3D

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#1 Tonk

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 06:02 AM

I came across this image a few minutes ago. If you can "free view" a stereo pair of images then you will enjoy this. It is ISON pre-pelihelion.

The original image is by Damian Peach, the 3D version by Brian May

Scroll down a little to get to the stereo setup

http://www.brianmay....sbnov13.html#29 - for "parallel" free viewing or for stereoscope use


http://brian-mayniac...ch_stereo_c.jpg - for "cross-eye" free viewing

The right one for you is the one where the comet appears in front of the background stars. The wrong one for you reverses this and puts the comet behind the stars

#2 Tapio

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 06:27 AM

Don't know if it's my eyes but it looks like the stars are closer than comet...;)

#3 Tonk

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 07:20 AM

Don't know if it's my eyes but it looks like the stars are closer than comet...;)


Yes its your method of freeviewing - the human population divide into those that can freeview "cross eyed" or those that do it "parallel" (the first link above is for "parallel" viewing or using a stereoscope device)

If it doesn't work for you then the image pair need to be swapped over for those that naturally do it crosseyed ...

... so here is a link to the same image pair swapped over for those that view "cross eyed"

http://brian-mayniac...ch_stereo_c.jpg

I've updated the original post now to give the choices and make it clear which is which

#4 Steve OK

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 07:42 AM

I'm a parallel "free-viewer", but had to shrink the image a bit to be able to see it. If the distance between corresponding parts of the images is greater than your interpupillary distance, your eyes have to "diverge" past parallel to get the images to merge. Mine don't want to do that! Very cool 3-D if you can see it though!

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#5 Tonk

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 08:15 AM

but had to shrink the image a bit to be able to see it


If you move your head back from the monitor that should work fine - its what I do - I'm a "parallel" too

It also works great with a stereoscope - I got one of the OWL scopes at London's Astrofest a couple of years back and just tried it now - it works great. Better than free viewing

#6 Rich (RLTYS)

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 09:23 AM

Unfortunetly with my eyes 3D doesn't work. :(

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#7 nytecam

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Posted 10 December 2013 - 11:55 AM

Thanks Tony - I'm a cross-eyed 3Der and Damien/ Brian's image works fine if stellar foreground. I've used 3D fuse for decades - great at lectures with suitable multiple images of Mars / Jupiter seen then as 3D globes :-)

#8 Thanatocoenosis

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Posted 13 December 2013 - 08:47 AM


If it doesn't work for you then the image pair need to be swapped over for those that naturally do it crosseyed ...



Wow! That is really neat. I can discern the 3-D effect in both links, but in the first link, the comet is in front of the stars; in the second link, it is behind the stars???

I wonder... I am ambidextrous and use both/either hands when performing tasks. I wonder if that could have anything to do with it, or can everyone see the effect, reversed, in both links?

#9 Tonk

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Posted 13 December 2013 - 10:48 AM

I wonder... I am ambidextrous and use both/either hands when performing tasks. I wonder if that could have anything to do with it


Not a bit of it! Nothing to do with how you use hands

Its solely dependent how you overlap the two images by either bringing your two eyes towards each other (cross eyed) or if you are able to just relax your eyes so that you have the sightlines parallel and you are focussed at infinity.

These actions dictate which eye is seeing which of the left/right image pairings in the overlapped image formed in your field of view and subsequently processed by your brain into 3D

When you get your freeviewing method right you will see 3 images of the comet (not 2 or 4) - left, center and right. The center image should be a perfect overlap of a left/right pair of the original images and this is the one seen in 3D.

Depending on how you do free-viewing one image of the 3 seen will always be 3D with the comet in front and the other will always have the stars in front (@ Thanatocoenosis - you are using the parallel method given which one you said has the comet in front).

This will be true for everybody (except those that are one eyed or can't bring focus to infinity).

Whats the difference between the two image pairs? One set is just the left/right swap of the other.

#10 Tonk

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Posted 13 December 2013 - 10:57 AM

great at lectures with suitable multiple images of Mars / Jupiter seen then as 3D globes :-)


Maurice - you can also have fun with certain Laura Ashley wallpaper patterns but you may need to tilt your head a bit to get the right horizon

#11 Scanning4Comets

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Posted 13 December 2013 - 04:13 PM

The 3D worked for me in both instances! First the comet appears to be behind the stars, then it is in front of them.

Thanks for sharing!

#12 DeanAK

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Posted 16 December 2013 - 04:22 AM

Very nicely done. I almost forgot about free-viewing 3d pictures, fun stuff. Now if I could just get my eyes to stay normal again...






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