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Where is Everybody?

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#51 azure1961p

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Posted 16 December 2013 - 07:52 AM

Oh my gosh i did e swing shift - did it for eight years. In my thirties I rolled with it. Even preferred third shift. I tried it in my late forties - against my wifes pressing that Im older now - she was right, I was miserable. I take my hat off Dave, I couldn't have done it for as long as you did.

Pete

#52 David Gray

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Posted 16 December 2013 - 08:11 AM

Thanks Pete,

Another diverting distraction I failed to include being a series of regular (one at a time ;)) girlfriends - I married my 10th - my steadfast soul-mate!

Looking back there must have been more hours in a day :question:

Cheers,
Dave.

#53 Michael Rapp

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Posted 16 December 2013 - 09:03 AM

To take a broader view, sometimes I wonder -- based on personal experience -- is that people get sucked in by the siren song of imaging and after spending all that money on the mount and camera, realize that planetary imaging is hard, time-consuming, ridiculously seeing-dependent, tedious, and the processing can be dreadfully boring at times.

Then, after having run the thousandth AVI through Registax and failing to get the expected accolades on the ten billionth blurry image of Jupiter, lose interest....

...and forget the joy and peace and sense of wonder of looking at a sharp planet in the eyepiece trying to tease out subtle detail on planets in which a thousand earths would fit.

(Wow, that came across as far more depressing than I intended. Also makes me seem critical about imaging, which I most certainly am not! Am I making sense? This coffee is weak this morning...)

#54 nirvanix

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Posted 16 December 2013 - 11:41 AM

Michael, it seems like you found a good compromise with the Mallincam? I was just visiting the Night Skies Network last night. I wish more of those Mallincam guys were active on there.

#55 Michael Rapp

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Posted 16 December 2013 - 02:44 PM

Yes and no.

With good seeing, the planetary view through the Mallincam is spectacular live. One of the broadcasters has a 25" Obsession and the views, with no processing what-so-ever, are better than the Pioneer photos of the 1970s in the excellent seeing we get down here during the summer.

With mediocre seeing, you'll often see better with your eye as the camera just can't keep up with the seeing undulations.

I drifted away from using my MCX on the planets as it is a lot of effort to set up my particular rig (maybe not for others) and I really need a good 2-3 hours to make it worthwhile for me.

(While not relevant to planetary observing, another reason I've drifted away from the camera is that it was just too easy to do deep sky. When I saw Leo I after hitting just a few buttons on the mount to slew to it, all the challenge had evaporated for me. Now, if I did not have access to a dark site, I would probably be 100% Mallicamming.)

#56 Asbytec

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Posted 16 December 2013 - 06:39 PM

Micheal, you touch on something that makes my 6" a pleasure to use. The challenge. Owning a 6" today is almost like reliving my childhood observing through my home made 6" Newt. I welcome the challenge but with decades of experience this time.

I was drawn in by the lure of imaging back in the mid 90s. Cameras, software, and techniques were not quite as good, at least not the set up I put together, and the results were not nearly as good as folks put out today. Imaging seems to have come a long way. Back then, anyway, it too a lot of time to set up and align everything. And it separated me from the subject. So, today there is more time to actually become one with the object.

I find that an enjoyable challenge and the result is also enjoyable to discuss with others doing the same thing and posting their own views. To me, this is what makes amateur astronomy social networking the place to be. So, maybe it's natural to be curious about where everyone else is.

David, for a second there I thought you were ranting about being retired. I was ready to set the record straight. It sounds like you are making the best of it, as am I when the weather cooperates. Really, it wasn't even until I retired before I became a regular in this forum. More time observing and more time to discuss those observations with others.

#57 azure1961p

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Posted 16 December 2013 - 07:42 PM

Dave,

LOL, there were definitely more hours in a day - and more hours in a night!!

Pete

#58 David Gray

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 11:40 AM

Yeehay good seeing at last – well excellent actually!

:jump: :whee: :jump:

Er....yes :grin:

I had returned to my Saturn ‘98/99 report, so may not have reappeared on CN for at least the rest of the week. But it cleared last night and saw Vega high in the west slowly blinking gently: so seeing had to be great……..Yes!!

There was two-tier patchy cloud: some high mackerel and very low-fast thinner patches racing northward, noticeably across the moon, and a degree of haze overall.

Uranus looked striated/banded straight off. Taking a look just now on ALPO-J I see that Stan had got a light area at the presented hemisphere 5 days ago but I had noticed none. Maybe I’d not got my eye in after a long spell away from the planet and the transparency not ideal.

After Uranus went to 27 Psc and used the Zeiss-Wildey 14mm Monocentric (x485) and got a sparkling view – like a mini-Izar. Considering posting if time – (back to Saturn).

Then (same eyepiece) Jupiter was ideally dimmed by the clouds with good detail. Then cloud increase thwarted my plans for Orion doubles.

Retirement is so laborious!

Cheers,
Dave.

#59 nirvanix

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 11:50 AM

Nice report Dave. What scope did you use at x485? Notice any good details on Jupiter?

#60 David Gray

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 11:58 AM

Nice report Dave. What scope did you use at x485? Notice any good details on Jupiter?


My thanks - just posted the obs. here!

Cheers,
Dave.

#61 TechPan6415

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 08:00 PM

But sometimes don't you just wonder, well, where is everybody?


The best things in life, the most rewarding and memorable experiences happen when you are not on the internet. I'll log out of here in a day or two once I am done looking up a few things and you won't see me for a good 9 months to a year...really man, life is SO much better without the internet.

#62 Asbytec

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 08:42 PM

Tech, what you're saying is, "get a life." That's great advice in and of itself, the best things in life are free. :lol:

How many people live without the internet completely? Balance, I guess, is important.

I agree with you over a whole range of activities. I am not into social networking, but since there are few nearby, being in here is about the best and only place to mingle with like minded astronomy hobbyists. I don't play pool or meet people online, that's best done in the real world. But discussing Jupiter, for example, you gotta go where people know what you're talking about. If you have a real life supporting group, that's better and the internet can augment your experience instead of replacing it.

Those memorable views of Jupiter do not lie on the internet, they lay in the sky above. You can surf the internet, but wiping out on an a very real coral reef is far more exciting, rewarding, and memorable. The best belly laughs originate from the silly comment made by the guy next to you. The personal interaction seems to stimulate a good belly laugh, when you look over and see a red faced friend gasping for air in tears.

I think I understand your point, but socializing on the net is becoming a part of our lives, for better or worse. Everyone is connected to some degree these days, some more than others. Especially being retired with a warm cup of Joe in the morning. But, not always, you're right.

On today's docket - playing pool with some really good players, coming home to check the weather online then pop in here to see what's been said, then hopefully heading out to do some observing, finally sharing that observation online later. Snuggle and watch TV, too, at some point in the late evening.

Observing is living, but it can be a solitary pursuit.

#63 Ed D

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 09:53 PM

For me, Cloudy Nights is about the extent of my social networking. My main participation these days are in the sketching and planetary forums, and I also like the ATM forum and the other observing forums. I have learned and done much more in a few short years here than all the pre-internet years observing solo and reading magazines. Many times I have wondered how far I would have taken my second go around with observing if it were not for the internet and Cloudy Nights, as well as all the other very informative resources that are literally available at my fingertips.

Well, my strut Dob should be cooled by now, time to play. If I see anything interesting I'll let y'all know tomorrow.

Ed D

#64 TechPan6415

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 01:33 AM

Tech, what you're saying is, "get a life."


Nah, you have one. I just like to remind people to live it beyond the keyboard...

#65 Asbytec

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 04:24 AM

Ed, yea, you said it about right for me, too.

Tech, it worked... :)

#66 Rich (RLTYS)

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 06:31 AM

Folks, can we bring this thread back to Solar System Observing??????

Rich (RLTYS)

#67 PhilCo126

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Posted 03 January 2014 - 04:54 PM

There have been studies on the number of amateur astronomers per country. Try the CAP webpage
https://www.iau.org/...ns/cap-journal/






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