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Determine RA/DEC Co-Ordinates

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#1 hytham

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 06:25 PM

Of a very specific region in one's image.

I have an idea of doing it using SGP and the "Centre Here" function to get an idea, but is there another way to determine it?

My reason is that I may have discovered a faint planetary nebula in Cassiopeia and I'm trying not to get too excited about it until I can verify/validate it further.

Thank you!

#2 jbalsam

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 07:30 PM

:shrug:

I would use MaximDL's pinpoint platesolving feature to center on the spot, and then look at the solved coordinates of the image's center. I don't know of a way to just click on an area of the image and have it show the coordinates... though that would be neat.

#3 Madratter

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 08:32 PM

Hytham, you might want to search the Simbad database to see if they have it. You can plot out stuff around another object so if you know where it is in relation to the other object, you might be able to figure out whether it is known or not.

Another way is to use a program like SkyTools 3 Pro that has a very deep limiting magnitude (roughly 19). Then find a star very close by. That will get you very close.

#4 CounterWeight

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Posted 17 December 2013 - 10:43 PM

A quick check in ST3pro yields 40 planetaries going down to mag22, nice thing is you can go to the interactive sky with a right click on the flat file. It also provides the RA and Dec in the flatfile, here's a screen clip-

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#5 hytham

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 12:15 AM

Thanks, gents. I'll have to get SkyTools 3 Pro as it looks like an awesome suite.

#6 orlyandico

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 03:38 AM

you could also try submitting the file to nova.astrometry.net online solver, it will even label your image.

but... the labels only cover the bright objects.

but given the labels you can then use SIMBAD to get into the area. no need for any software to download.

this is how i identified some mag 22 galaxies in a deep image i took (using rented equipment).

#7 Madratter

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 07:49 AM

ST3Pro is definitely all that and a bag of chips. But you can probably do what you want with just SIMBAD.

#8 hytham

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 02:58 AM

I was able to identify the two brightest stars next to it - both have a TYC classification. Neither one of them show any planetary nebula in a 10 arc minute radius. So I expanded this further to 20 minutes and still nothing...

Who can I talk to next to tell me that I'm 100 years too late or possibly (long shot) even better news ... ? :)

#9 Madratter

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 09:04 AM

At very least the people here should be able to tell you who to talk to. They might be the appropriate people:

http://www.cbat.eps....coveryForm.html

#10 hytham

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 12:23 AM

I was able to get in contact with a well known amateur astronomer that has access to contacts that most of can only dream of. Turns out he is also a fan of my astrophotography and has me linked on his page alongside of a few greats (huge ego boost and smile from this guy - now where is that clear weather??).

It was confirmed that my planetary nebula had already been discovered and credited to a fellow amateur astronomer in France that has an additional 13 discoveries to his name! Incredible!

The reason why I could not find this in any of the online databases because it is currently documented in an unpublished professional database known as the IPHAS catalogue. It has so far been credited with 300 new PNe discoveries in the Northern Hemisphere and the MASH survey has discovered an additional 1000 in the Southern Hemisphere. The IPHAS catalogue is slated for publication sometime in 2014 - did not receive a solid date.

In the meantime another database is slated for publication in February of 2014 of all known PNe discoveries to date (3300 total).

The good news is that his contacts in France have requested that I focus my processing on this planetary nebula because it contains data that they can use for further analysis/research.

Though I don't get credit for the discovery, this has most certainly opened up a new door for me in this hobby and has sparked a huge interest in performing discovery work.

Time for a new CCD!

Ah yes - ~coordinates!

03:04:21.31 +62:18:02

Located North of star TYC4052-824-1 and East of TYC 4052-1260-1.

You *may* be able to see it in the DSS catalogue's red plate, but is quite faint.

The official designations: IPHASX J030421.3+621802, LDû 14

#11 Madratter

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 07:40 AM

Cool! I'm sorry you didn't get a discovery, but the whole thing still sounds awesome. :)

#12 CounterWeight

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 10:30 AM

Sounds great - I went through a similar exercise some time ago and was impressed that I think the person who responded to me was a scientist from JPL/CIT. I'll email Greg at SkyTools and hope that new catalog incorporated in the ST3 !

#13 terry59

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 12:00 PM

Hytham - That is awesome. A discovery would be a lifetime thing for me but being able to contribute data for scientific analysis is wonderful.

What CCD are you considering?

#14 hytham

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 09:53 PM

I'd be lying if I said I wasn't bummed that I was beaten to the discovery, but the experience gained is very well worth the bad news. BUT the sky is a wee bit, oh ... enormous ... and something tells me there may be one, possibly two, undiscovered nebulae out there for the rest of us to find.

Terry I am considering the FLI ML3200 camera (NABG) due to its extremely high sensitivity in both Ha and OIII - ~90% and ~65% respectively. The downside (outside of another freaking bloody expensive CCD) is its small field of view - @F3.65 it is 1.5 x 2.2 degrees.

I never thought of getting into the aspect of discovery, or research work because of the perceived disadvantage we would have, but after seeing 14 discoveries by an amateur definitely gets me excited about where any of us can go with this.






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