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#51 Qwickdraw

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 06:01 AM

I am fairly sure these UO volcano tops would qualify as classics.

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#52 Bomber Bob

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 10:02 PM

No photos, but I nominate the 1970's Meade Research Grade Orthos... great glass!

#53 clintwhitman

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 07:26 AM

There is allot of great glass out there. My personal favorites are, For planetary,,, Abbe Ortho Zeiss, TMB Super Monos, Pentax SMC orthos and Nippon Kogaku orthos Still need a 7mm for my bino set. These are the cream of the crop. I have made a good start towards a bino set of Meade RGs. They are very good reliable eyepieces.

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#54 clintwhitman

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 07:40 AM

For DSOs Using Denk IIs and my bino set of 26, 32, 40mm Televue Smooth side plossels has been hard to beat. These are incredible eyepieces for faint fuzzies. When binos are used they really create a most stunning view.

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#55 DoctorNoodle

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 03:55 PM

From left to right: A no-name 27mm Kellner with helical fine focus that came with a 10 inch Coulter Odyssey blue-tube Dob in 1985. Two Tuthill Plossls, 10mm and 30mm bought in '86. I still use the 30mm.

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#56 youngamateur42

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 03:59 PM

My "new" as of yesterday 16mm T2 Nagler, my very first Nagler and I think it qualifies.

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#57 orion61

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 05:20 PM

Lets not forget Edmund RKE's I still use them as my Main eyepieces..

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#58 Falcon-

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 08:21 PM

I am glad this thread was started. I have been thinking for a while now I could really use some advice about what ones of my older eyepieces are Classics I should use for observing, and what ones are simply "vintage" (and likely to be outperformed by low-end modern eyepieces).

So in all of your expert (or at least opinionated ;) ) opinions what ones of these would you expect to provide good performance (or are Classic for other reasons)?

In the middle row, left to right:
- B&L A.S.P. 30mm
- Meade MA 25mm
- Celestron K. 25mm (Circle T marked)
- Celestron Er. 20mm (Circle T marked)
- Or. 6mm (Circle T marked)
- SR 4mm (no markings)

The MA25 and SR4 came to me with the Towa #339 and the three Circle T marked eyepieces where with the '77 C8 - no idea of any of them are original bundled EPs or just part of the previous owners collections.

Also in the picture is the unmarked 2x barlow and unmarked diagonal that came with the C8 (again no idea if they shipped with the scope when it was sold new or later additions). The K12.5mm and PL8mm are just about my entire collection of modern eyepieces, both acquired from Sheldon/MASILMW.

I also have a bunch of 0.965" Huygens eyepiece but they are alas not handy right now, and I have made the *assumption* that they will be inferior to the ones pictured anyway.

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#59 T1R2

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 08:37 PM

I must have a gold or polished brass compass, what brand, and where can I find one? it looks great btw.

#60 fjs

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 08:41 PM

Can't help you with most of those. I have had a Meade MA 40 for 30 years. It is something of an anachronism, as a 32mm plossl will give the same field of view with greater magnification and a darker backround. I find it to be a good, usable eyepiece. The MA eyepieces are basically an improved upon (don't ask me in what way) Kellner design. Therefore, they work best with a longer focal ratio objective.

To me, and I might be the only one, they are a "classic" eyepiece.

#61 orion61

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 11:32 PM

I bought it on the Bay and it was only about 10 bucks!
I love the snap shut front cover. It is also Glow-In-The- Dark
It is a pretty highg quality and accurate (smooth). Compass
I wouldn't part with it. I should buy another one as this one has had a LOT of use and is starting to show wear and scratches! They had Bronze, Brass, and Antique Brass. This was the "New Brass Look.
Thanks
Larry

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#62 T1R2

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 01:13 AM

thanks Larry, that is certainly affordable, I might just make me an account and pick some up.

#63 orion61

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 03:31 AM

Anytime.. Boy I'd sure love to have your 80mm F15!
I have the Vixen 80mm F11, terrific. How's the color correction?

#64 T1R2

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 03:46 AM

its ok, not as good as the tasco right now, but I'm working on it, stars appear a little bloated at higher powers, thought it seems well corrected for SA, I cant tell a difference between inside and outside focus and it has me stumped, its a little of a pain to use on the original EQ mount, so Im waiting for summer before I go any further, its hard to find rings for it since it has a 76mm tube. or maybe I'm not looking hard enough. but at low power its very good

#65 astro140

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 03:27 PM

Hi George,
My set of brass Brandon's with Barlow

Steve
NM

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#66 rcwolpert

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 03:32 PM

Good looking set, Steve!

#67 Geo31

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 05:09 PM

Hi George,
My set of brass Brandon's with Barlow

Steve
NM


Very nice indeed.

Do you know the vintage?

I knew there was a brass set of Brandons produced and sold with the barlow. I don't know the particulars of my eyepiece. The person I bought them from seemed to think my eyepiece is a Huygens.

#68 terraclarke

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 08:52 PM

Robert, here are all of my Sears color-coded eyepieces. No white though. Going around the circle clockwise beginning with green- 22mm K, 20mm K, 12.5 mm HM, 9mm HM, 8mm HM, 6mm HM, 4mm SR, the 'green' moon filter, sun filter.

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#69 charlesgeiger

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 12:00 AM

I received a 16.3mm Galoc for my 21st or 22nd birthday. I am 63 now! There was not a better eyepiece I could find. I used it also with my 2.4X barlow for extremely fine views. It has about a 65 degree field and if you unscrew the top of the ocular, you have maybe 70 plus degrees but with an ill defined edge. It still holds up very well definition wise but does not have quite the kick a new fully multi-coated ocular has. The only down point is you cannot use filters with it. I remember compairing it with a 16mm Konig and the Konig starting breaking down way befor the Galoc. I used both in my own scope but maybe had a bad example of the UO Konig even though it was new. I can not let go of this eyepiece. It always pleases and has fine definition. One story I can tell; you probably won't believe it either. I used to drive up to Mount Rainier and observe from several locations including Sunrise and Paradise and near Greenwater. One night I came all the way back from Paradise and parked and went to bed this was about a 75 mile drive...It was probably about 4 or 5 am when I got home. Next day I was going through my equipment and could not find my Galoc...I drove an old 52 Chev pickup and it had a diamond plate rear bumper. Believe it or not, I found the Galoc sitting on the diamond plate bumper...I remembered the night before setting it there temporarily (forgot about it in my tired state). If you have driven to Paradise from Seattle or Tacoma, you know the road has many curves. But it was set just so in between the diamond plate pattern. It wasn't even dusty! The gods were with me on that night. I still don't know how it remained there without bumping off. So it is special to me as my parents got it for me and for all the years of great performance!

#70 actionhac

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 12:09 AM

The manual explains the turret and installing the eyepieces into the color coded sockets and goes on to say:

"There is no eyepiece for the white-ringed socket. This socket may be used for an additional eyepiece you may have."

Thats all I've ever found referencing the white socket or a white eyepiece.

The white Asto Optical Sears eyepiece and who made the Edmund Scientific white tube 3" 4" and 5" objective lenses are great mysteries, we probably will never know the answer.
I think the white eyepiece was a boo-boo that didn't get caught in time of production and the source for the Edmund objectives a well kept secret at Edmund.

Robert


#71 fjs

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 12:22 AM

That is a great story, thanks!

#72 amicus sidera

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 12:55 AM

The white Asto Optical Sears eyepiece and who made the Edmund Scientific white tube 3" 4" and 5" objective lenses are great mysteries, we probably will never know the answer.
I think the white eyepiece was a boo-boo that didn't get caught in time of production and the source for the Edmund objectives a well kept secret at Edmund.


From what I could find out from current and former Edmund employees, it would appear that Edmund's pre-1981 3" f/15 and 4" f/15 achromatic lenses were almost certainly produced for them by Carton Optical in Japan. Incidentally, these lenses are slightly larger in diameter than those that an entirely different Japanese optical firm produced for Unitron.

The 1981-present Edmund achromats - 3" f/11, 4" f/15 and 5" f/15 - were designed by Dr. Rank, and all were produced in-house.

As for who made Jaeger's lenses, well... you're on your own, folks... :grin:

#73 SDStargazer

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 12:59 AM

Is there a quick down & dirty way to figure FOV for some of these older eyepieces? A general rule of thumb? Really don't want to watch a star cross the EP lens for 10 or 12 EPs

#74 Chuck Hards

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 01:26 AM

For a true field of view, you can just compare what you see in the eyepiece to the corresponding field of a very detailed star atlas. Measure the separation of two stars at opposite sides of the eyepiece field. Of course that's only good for a given focal length objective.

For apparent field, you can extrapolate by comparing the unknown eyepiece to an eyepiece of identical focal length with a known AFOV, using the same technique as above. You can also do it without a telescope. Hold the unknown eyepiece up to one eye, the known eyepiece up to the other. Superimpose the two and extrapolate the unknown apparent field. Not exact but will get you in the ballpark.

#75 fjs

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Posted 24 December 2013 - 01:31 AM

You would have to measure (or get from specs) the field stop diameter, then ask your calculator to give you the TFOV.

TFOV=Eyepiece Field Stop Dia(mm)/Telescope Focal Length x 57.3. That result times magnification would give AFOV






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