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Where's the photomicrography thread?

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#1 snorkler

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Posted 18 December 2013 - 11:59 PM

I've been lurking here learning about microscopes, trying to decide what to buy. I was leaning toward an Amscope B490T, but an Amscope B100B-MS binocular compound microscope opportunity came up on Craigslist. I scooped it up for $100, and am quite pleased with the scope's optical and mechanical quality.

I also picked up an Olympus SZ3060 stereo microscope complete for $125.

Frankly, I don't miss a trinocular imaging port at all. I've managed to photograph everything I want to with a cobbled-together camera adapter I scrounged from spare parts.

Which leads me to the question: where is the photomicrography thread?

Here's an Argentine Ant worker. The 100X photo of her abdomen shows the eggs inside her. Even though they're unfertilized eggs, they can hatch into fully fertile male ants.

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#2 snorkler

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 12:07 AM

My photomicrography setup. The blue 2" receiver tube clamps to one of the eyepiece tubes. A 2" telescope eyepiece nosepiece drops into the receiver. The nosepiece is threaded with t-mount threads.
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#3 snorkler

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Posted 19 December 2013 - 12:43 AM

Biological supply house prepared slide of a pine needle in cross section (100X).

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#4 DeanAK

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 09:43 PM

Wow, that pine needle looks amazing. Beautiful structures.

#5 snorkler

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 12:57 AM

Thanks, Dean. Today's discovery - a Vorticella.
http://youtu.be/R04ZTvzUhu0

I can imagine what the experienced microscopists are thinking: Give him a little time... he'll soon discover his equipment's limitations... can't he see his uneven field illumination? wait until he tries focusing on a swimming protozoan... I'm learning. I really am.

#6 snorkler

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 09:59 PM

Today's capture @400X. I think it's a primitive rotifer with its ring of cilia. Here's a link to my video of it feeding.

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#7 snorkler

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Posted 27 December 2013 - 01:21 AM

Today's catch - a big rotifer.

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#8 snorkler

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Posted 27 December 2013 - 01:27 AM

About 100 images of this Argentine Ant stacked to obtain this depth of focus (looking from underneath), at 100X.
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#9 snorkler

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Posted 29 December 2013 - 08:55 PM

Another Argentine Ant, from above, with pseudo darkfield lighting, 100X, ~25 stacked images. Posted Image

#10 snorkler

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Posted 30 December 2013 - 01:59 AM

It's multicellular, microscopic (photos are cropped from 100x views), and snakes itself forward and backward. Found in freshwater collected in a yard waste container seeded with grass clippings. The three rectangular spots on the tail may help in identifying it. It is not visible to the naked eye, so it's not a rat-tailed maggot.

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#11 snorkler

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 12:58 AM

Remember my bright field pine needle cross-section photo above? I made a decent patch stop, and here's a true dark field photo of the same slide.

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#12 snorkler

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 01:10 AM

True dark field photo of an Argentine Ant head (<1 mm. size), about a dozen photos, stacked. I've dreamed of getting this amount of detail since I was in college 50+ years ago. I didn't think it was doable without a scanning electron microscope back in the day. Stacking software makes this level of detail possible.

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#13 snorkler

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 01:20 AM

My stereo microscope turned out to be an Olympus SZ4045 ~50 years old. Its rack and pinion focuser and interpupillary adjustments were frozen with decades of congealed grease. Once I cleaned it up, it gives great views, and you can't beat its $125 price. Here's a photo of a geranium flower through the Olympus showing stamen/anther/pollen detail.

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#14 snorkler

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 01:24 AM

Here's a photo of my stereo microscope.

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#15 snorkler

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 07:54 PM

Here's a slice of a Daddy Long-legs Spider at 40X through the stereo scope. Notice the 6 small black eyes are in focus, but most of its long legs are out of focus,as should be expected.

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#16 snorkler

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 07:58 PM

This photo is a stack of 28 slices of the same spider, showing how stacking can be used to increase depth of focus.

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#17 snorkler

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 08:11 PM

Here's an aphid @40X through the compound microscope, bright field lighting.

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#18 snorkler

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 08:13 PM

Here's the same aphid seen under polarized light.

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#19 snorkler

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Posted 17 January 2014 - 08:16 PM

And the same aphid under polarized light with darkfield illumination.

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#20 snorkler

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 09:50 AM

Here's where polarized lighting makes a difference. First photo is honeybee mouthparts @40X, nonpolarized. Second photo is a fully polarized shot of the same commercial slide.
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#21 Scott Horstman

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 01:16 PM

Very cool Darrell!

#22 snorkler

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Posted 23 January 2014 - 04:15 PM

Thanks Scotty,

Playing some more with polarized light microscopy. I took these all in one session, but didn't square my adapter, so the right side of each photo is out of focus. Left or top photo is brightfield, right or bottom is polarized. These are prepared slides:

Dense connective tissue
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Pine needle
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Pine stem
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Corn stem
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Tilia
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Pumpkin stem
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lily ovary
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lily anther
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Nymphaca
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sunflower stem
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Coprimus mushroom
http://i1179.photobu...zps6fe7ea72.jpg

#23 Grava T

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 08:24 PM

I'm a little late to the thread but here is a composition of a small beetle in phase contrast.

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#24 snorkler

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 11:29 PM

Very nice, Michael. I wondered what phase contrast is capable of doing. Very impressive.

#25 Grava T

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Posted 04 February 2014 - 12:58 PM

Thanks Darrell. I don't have the correct phase objectives yet but I can get decent results with a phase condenser and achromat objectives. The background was more of a dark grey so I filled it black in photoshop. The image of the beetle however is not modified in any way. I used an Olympus BHC trinocular compound microscope at 100x for this image composition.






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