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Jupiter 21 Dec

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#1 Asbytec

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 02:37 PM

Spent all afternoon under cloudy skies working my pallet and passing the time. Not quite ready. Stepped outside about midnight as the last of the clouds were breaking to reveal Ant II skies.

The festooning is so very soft, really hard to make anything of it. As pure luck would have it, there come those three ovals, again.

The NEB is the most complex as I have seen it. Very hard to get right. Rifts and finger like extensions everywhere.

The north is beautiful as ever, a little more dark cloud visible and (trusting the glimpse) maybe even a lighter spot. I suspect that was LRS-1, or the cloud concentration preceding it, leaving the picture. I don't think LRS-1 would have been visible at this point.

GRS looked very dark, kind of dull. The wake was alright, one or two pretty bright features, some streaks. On the trailing limb, there seemed to be some patchy blue streaks along the northern border.

The STeB was seen pretty much across the disc, with a couple of slightly darker concentrations. The SSTeZ seemed to broaden near the trailing limb.

Seeing was Ant II mostly, (edit: 260x) with OU 12mm HD Ortho and 1.6x shorty Barlow. Transparency was excellent (held E and F Trap continuously, that was sweet) with a waning gibbous moon.

EDIT: Dec 21 at 1600UT puts System I at 345 and System II at 267.

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#2 azure1961p

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 04:04 PM

This is crazy good Norme.

I'm seeing a lot of nuances touched on here - the subtle gradients in the belt encompassing southern white spots, the pale sulphur zone neath the polar region and NTB and how its split. A lot of this dirt of secondary subtleties mark this piece with a refined look. The EZ clearly has a lot if this going on as well. I'm getting punchy Norme - like Michael Rosalina - ill even take a poor Pickering value!!!! I want to see these contrasts in SOME level. Hey I've got a straight ten days off - hopefully ill get lucky!

Your renderings this year have an edge that's really refined. Again I can't help but wonder about your mods having an effect. You've hit these micro spots hither and yon - lol - I'm getting cagey!!!

Pete

#3 Chopin

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 05:19 PM

Where to start!?!

First off, to comment on the magnification...that's my kind of exit pupil. Just goes to show that with trained eyes and good skies you can pull off a lot between 1-2mm.

Now, about the features:

I'm a linear thinker, so I'll start with the south (from the top) and work my way "down". That small oval on the preceding limb of the SSTeB looks like it must have been a hard catch. A testament to your keen vision.

It's nice to see some more congruence in the STeB, giving a nice layered appearance. It seems like that band has lacked much activity or even presence lately.

The portion trailing the GRS in the SEB looks like it is loosing some of the distinct "waves" that it had shown previously. Good work picking up what I assume to be smaller eddies in place of those waves, bands, bars, or whatever you want to call them. I also have to note that you are picking up some distinctly variable hues in the SEB, from the rosiness of the perturbed region to the sepia like colors north of that.

The festoons in the EzN have a decidedly washed out presentation. But like the STeB, the EB seems to be making a comeback.

Now, for the part I've been dying to mention, that freaking NEB is nothing short of astonishing! Holy shnykees, Batman! The beautiful wave in the band itself at the preceding limb is a superb feature to start off the activity in the belt. Then, all those interesting fissures at the south side of the belt (just below the festoons in the upside down image) add such depth to your observation. The details are so crisp, I have to ask if you represented them in that way because it was indicative of the seeing you had at those moments? Just past the center are two soft pale marks, and I can't help but imagine that the smaller of the two might be an oval itself. The best capture of this, to my eyes, is the vast number of little festoons drifting off of the north side of the Belt. Wow to that.

Special note to the oval in the NNTeZ.

A ton going on here. Your observations are rediculous, Norme. Inspirational, even.

#4 azure1961p

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 06:25 PM

I agree with Jason from your work and others it appears the waves trailing the GRS are smoothing out or disappearing. Quite a contrast to last year about the same time.

Pete

#5 kenrenard

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 07:52 PM

Norme,
Very good rendering, I enjoy the NEB immensely your have some wonderful detail the fain festooning is also quite good. I also like the capture of the GRS on the edge. It looks like the wake is not a pronounced as it was last week. I saw almost a sawtooth look when I sketched last week.

The three ovals are also looking very good. I hope my weather improves as I would love to try to view the ovals. You are really getting some great views this year. I am watching Mickey Mouse Clubhouse :cool: :crazy: as I write and the rain and clouds continue. My three year old is quite excited as Christmas draws near and the snow is quickly melting 63F tomorrow for a high, almost summer weather for this time of year. Hope you keep getting these great skies.
:bow: :bow: :bow:

Ken

#6 Asbytec

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 08:47 PM

Pete, yea, the NTeZ is much lighter, sort of a light sandy color in this area until it gives way to the almost white band on the following limb. Sulfur? For a minute, I though you were talking about the sulfur hue in the NTeB. I still cannot tease that out.

I spent more time on this sketch trying to get the subtleties down. This comes from that Adolf thread and from David Grey. Those guys seem to master subtleties and smooth contrasts. Fell out into bed about 3:30AM.

It was a super night, both E and F trap stars were not only held constantly, but they were bright little pinpoints, as well. Never seen them in such a way, usually they are dim and fading in and out. But, the night started late and ended too quickly, never wanted to pack it in. But, I had no plan other than to mingle with the moon and a few other showpieces.

Transparency must have been very good because Jupiter was actually and noticeably very much brighter. Seeing held around Ant II, about Pickering 7 to 8/10, and even better. In focus star images were barely moving most times, you could count the rings easily. It was one of those nights where I believe in a creator and give him thanks for the blessing. Serious, what else can a retired observer do when things come together so well?


Get cagey, man. I want you to share the views. Our season has just begun with lingering clouds, but it's already paying off.

#7 Asbytec

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 08:52 PM

Jason, speaking of the moon (to Pete.) Man, what a sketch you could have done on this night. Gosh, indescribable. Sketch anything, for that matter, Jupiter and M42 included. Just, "ug!"

Yes, that lone oval was extremely difficult. The other four were not that difficult. It curious as those three seem to be closing the gap on that one preceding it. It seemed a bit closer than a few days ago.

You're right, the GRS wake does appear less active. But there were some "white caps" on a couple of waves. And there was at least one streak seen inside the wake, and another across the top tapering into the SEB. (By the way, the SEB is a bit overdone, lot of pixel manipulation to get it right and it's didn't work out well.)

The festoons are very washed out, to my eye. Not as prominent as they were a week or so ago. There is a faint hint of an EB, or at least some cloud forming along it. Very faint, indeed.

The NEB was astonishing, really. It was hard to sketch and hard to observe, too, but when the seeing was dead calm it really stood out. I actually spent more time on the NEB this observation just trying to nail it down.

The slightest bit of seeing and that finer stuff would blur just enough to become difficult. So, it took a lot of patients and yes, indicative of the seeing. Those two pale marks close together, one might have been a brighter "spot" of oval. It appeared that way, but not really seen as a much brighter concentration. I think it is, though.

Those finger like extensions off the north NEB were just crazy. You're right. There seems to be quite a few of them, too, especially at this longitude.

One other comment, those faint bands in the north, still trying to figure out what's going on. They appeared to be two of them pinching off a brighter thin cloud band, part of the NTeZ, probably. That was stunning, too.

Jason, if I open a Astro Bed and Breakfast, you need to come. Find a few investors and put in a nice 10" Newt and maybe an 8" Mak, and a 5" APO. I joke about doing that so others can share the stunning views, but after last night it doesn't sound like such a bad idea. Maybe even viable. It would come complete with a guarantee of excellent seeing or your money back.

#8 Asbytec

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 08:53 PM

Ken, there is something of a saw tooth appearance, still. I think the SEB approaching the preceding limb was not as well contrasted, there may be more to it that I could not capture. I am still hoping you can get a clear spell with descent seeing, it's make my day if you could catch those ovals, Ken. It's such a sweet view, and interesting too. Never saw anything like them before. (Mickey Mouse, yea, a lot like that. :) )

I am pulling for you're clear and reasonably steady night.

#9 Asbytec

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 08:58 PM

Pete, speaking of sweet spots, I dunno, been thinking about that. The 6" must be in a sweet spot here, it has to be. Seeing is often enough diffraction limited and that makes all the difference.

What I was wondering is if that's about it, though. If that's about what the 6" can offer on the focal plane and if I am able to see all or most of it. Is there additional detail on the focal plane and I miss it, or am I seeing everything the 6" can offer? I dunno.

I don't have aperture fever, the views in the 6" are enough to keep my jaw detached, and laying on the ground where a feral cat can drag it away, for a good long time. The 6" has to be in a very sweet spot in the conditions here. It's possible an 8" is, too, but a 6" is plenty to keep one busy and satiated.

All, I am just enthralled with Jupiter in the conditions here. Maybe you can understand if I spend every night doing this. Its just amazing.

#10 Chopin

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 11:08 PM

Jason, if I open a Astro Bed and Breakfast, you need to come. Find a few investors and put in a nice 10" Newt and maybe an 8" Mak, and a 5" APO. I joke about doing that so others can share the stunning views, but after last night it doesn't sound like such a bad idea. Maybe even viable. It would come complete with a guarantee of excellent seeing or your money back.


Oh yeah, I like the sound of that. You know, I have a 12" mirror that I'd love to turn into a monster f6-ish newt, designed for binoviewer use right out of the box. Sounds like just the place to build one. :grin:

#11 Asbytec

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Posted 21 December 2013 - 11:17 PM

I am half serious. There is a small apartment complex run by an equally quaint elderly lady, my old landlord, that is right smack dab in the middle of good seeing in Bortle blue skies. She has a lot we can put up a small observatory. I'm sure she'd appreciate the business even though most of her apartments are rented. After opening and running a bar, a restaurant, and a failed pool stick production, this might be a business opportunity. It's not yet, so I hope this is not a vendor ad. :lol:

#12 dweller25

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 06:27 AM

Norme, another great observation.

I have set my next objective to try to see the white ovals in the SSTEB - I have NEVER seen them so to help my wife bought me a pair of Binoviewers for Christmas. If I see half the detail you see I will be happy :-)

Your idea of having an astronomy B&B is a good one as you have the one thing all astronomers need - stunning seeing......

#13 Asbytec

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 07:07 AM

David, thank you. My girlfriend came out after the sketch. I tried to get her to see both the ovals and the bright finger of cloud protruding in the north. All she could see was the two main belts and said I was, "kidding her." It was frustrating. :lol:

Yea, the B&B is just a thought. Not sure it will become a reality, more of a fantasy, I guess. It could probably be done, but the costs of the airline ticket alone and getting a week or so off to visit a foreign country is kind of hard for some folks to do. It would just be nice to share the skies. I dunno, though...I may get a wild hair and actually consider talking to the right people to get it done. It's just a thought, a fantasy.

#14 Special Ed

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 09:01 AM

Norme,
Super drawing! Don't be too hard on your girlfriend--it takes more than seeing. You've been training your eye with many observations since you began this apparition and it shows.

You've also commented about how things are duller/brighter/not in the same place as previously seen. That's a function of serial observations and demonstrates, to paraphrase Herodotus, you can't look at the same Jupiter twice. :)

#15 Asbytec

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 09:37 AM

Ed, it dawned on me how bright Jupiter was last night, too, even at 260x. You know, for the first time in recent memory, I could actually see the winter Milky Way passing through Orion in a yellow zone with humid skies. The E and F Trap stars were not fussy small white specks fading in and out, they were tiny bright yellow pinpoints and held them both constantly. That sight in itself was simply amazingly transfixing. Even GF saw them. :lol:

Transparency was amazing as was the steadiness, but that transparency brightened Jupiter more so than with mother nature's usual neutral density filter overhead. That got me thinking about how others benefit from filters while I find no use for them normally. Maybe, huh?

#16 frank5817

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 04:23 PM

Norme,

You are the man on fire sketching Jupiter.
I look with great pleasure at what you have been posting.

Those of us in the middle of the USA would love to have just a peek at something beyond the clouds.

Best,
Frank :)

#17 Tommy5

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 04:36 PM

Great Jup sketch, you are really getting great views with 6" Mak, the high ceiling clouds often give me better views with my 6" achro it tames some of the C.A. I get. It is amazing that you can get those little white ovals to appear great job again.

#18 Asbytec

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 09:09 PM

Frank and Tommy, thank you both.

You can imagine the enjoyment I get with the conditions here. Our observing season has just begun, in the northern latitudes it's getting cold and windy. Jupiter is well placed for observers in the tropics. It's a function of geography that the same climate that brings the cold and wind is the same climate that brings our observing season. And Jupiter is well place for it.

Yea, it's great, that little 6" is in it's element as would be your 6" Achro, Tommy. Seriously, I cannot believe what a 6" scope can do, it's plenty to keep one busy and content.

#19 niteskystargazer

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 05:36 PM

Norme,

Very good sketch of the Dec. 21st Jupiter :).

CS,KLU,

:thanx:,

Tom

#20 Ed D

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 08:09 PM

Norme, what can I say that hasn't already been said. Gorgeous sketch with an awesome amount of detail. A 6" scope of good quality (Mak/achro/Newt/etc) can deliver the goods.

Ed D

#21 Asbytec

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 09:48 PM

Ed, I am finding you are right. No aperture fever here, a 6" in good conditions can deliver the goods. It puts up enough to keep me busy for a good long time. :)






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