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NEAIC 2014

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#1 Bob Moore

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 08:07 PM

Hi All, NEAIC 2014 registration will be open this week. here is the mail in form and speaker last as of to day.

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#2 Bob Moore

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Posted 12 January 2014 - 08:15 PM

Hi All, NEAIC 2014 registration will be open this week. here is the mail in form.

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#3 Bob Moore

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Posted 18 January 2014 - 01:51 PM

hi everyone here is the latest speaker update. If you would like to suggest anyone to fill the remaining slots Please sent me a note.

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#4 Bob Moore

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Posted 28 January 2014 - 04:01 PM

hi all,here is the latest speaker list

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#5 Bob Moore

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Posted 24 February 2014 - 10:27 PM

here is the latest NEAIC speaker up date, not listed are the evening work shops, they are listed below. the evening programs are open ended and start at 7:30 pm

Workshop #1 (Thursday) - JP Metsavainio; Tone Mapping
Workshop #2 (Thursday ) - Preston Starr Operating a remote observatory
Workshop #3 (Friday) - Martin Pugh (High Resolution Astro Imaging)
Workshop #4 (Friday) – Ken Crawford (TBA)

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#6 George N

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 06:03 PM

Bob,

What time does it start (first speaker) on Thursday?

I take it that the additional cost workshops are all in the evening?

#7 A. Viegas

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Posted 25 February 2014 - 08:20 PM

Bob-

Do you have an agenda for each day? For those of us who can only make one day, like the Friday session it would be useful to see the speaker line up for Friday.

Al

#8 Bob Moore

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Posted 26 February 2014 - 05:43 PM

i cant get the file small enough to fit, can you PM me an e-mail address and i'll sent it

#9 Bob Moore

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 10:54 AM

Hi all, here is the latest NEAIC speaker update 1 of 2

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#10 Bob Moore

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 10:57 AM

part 2

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#11 Bob Moore

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 11:12 AM

Apogee Instruments
Astro Haven
Astro Physics :bow:
Astrofactors QHY
Astronomy Technologie Today
AstroPix
ATIK Cameras
Celestron :bow:
Chroma Technology Corp
DC3 Dreams :bow:
Diffraction Limited
Explore Scientific
Finger Lakes :bow:
Fishcamp Engineering
Innovations Foresight
Meade :bow:
PlaneWave Instruments :bow:
Point Grey :bow:
Quantum Scientific
S.B.I.G.
Shelyak Instruments
Sky-Watcher
Software Bisque
Starlight Xpress
Tele Vue Optics
Willmann-Bell
IOptron

Canon USA :bow:

:bow: :bow: :bow:= sponsors

#12 rodney

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 12:42 PM

Awesome job Bob... thank you for updating us.

#13 Bob Moore

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Posted 23 March 2014 - 02:50 PM

that's what i'm here for!!

#14 Ken Crawford

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 08:46 AM

Looking forward to seeing old friends and meeting new ones!

#15 Thomas Karpf

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 08:52 AM

Bob, since you have an exhibitors list for the NEAIC and were willing to post it here, could you also PLEASE post the NEAF exhibitors list here on CloudyNights?

Thanks.

#16 Bob Moore

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 10:56 AM

Tom, I would if I had the information, I am no longer on the Board of RAC and play no part in NEAF I have asked repeatedly for some one who knows what they are talking about to post something and will ask again, sorry I can't do more for you all. I have the NEAIC info Because I run NEAIC.

#17 Paramount

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 03:42 PM

I'm looking forward to this immensely, it is four years since I was last here
Best wishes
Gordon

#18 Bob Moore

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Posted 27 March 2014 - 10:06 PM

This is going to be a long one, but since there in no where else to post it in a timely manor here you go.

2014 NEAIC Speakers, Talk titles, and Abstracts Day 1

Dr.Benjamin Mazin
Abstract: New chip for CCD’s Detectors for UV, Optical, and near-IR;
In the last five years my group has made remarkable progress in turning superconducting lumped element microwave resonators into the most powerful UV, optical, and near-IR detectors in the world. In this talk I will describe the operating principles of these detectors, called Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors, and describe some of the exciting astronomy that we have done with them. I will finish by discussing future possibilities of the technology, including the possibility that these detectors will be the first ones to detect life on nearby planets.

Jerry Lodriguss
Abstract: Top 10 Secrets for DSLR Planetary Imaging;
The quality of your astro photos depends on a long chain of interconnected factors such as the quality of your equipment, the darkness of your observing site, and your expertise in capturing the original data and then processing it to bring out all of the details that are present in the most aesthetic manner. Jerry will discuss the top ten things you can do to improve your long-exposure deep-sky astro photos. Most of these tips will also apply deep sky imaging with any type of digital camera.

Jason Ware
Abstract: Imaging with the StarLock fully integrated Auto guiding system;
I have been photographing the night sky for 25 years and have run across almost every peril that confronts the astro-imager. Therefore, when Meade Instruments designed their LX850 imaging system with Starlock guiding, they asked me to beta test it to identify areas for improvement. Although this is a proprietary system, the challenges are common to anyone who endeavors to photograph the night sky. You will learn how to identify, measure and correct common imaging problems like periodic error drift, differential flexure, focus drift and collimation, all of which can lead to "not-round" stars and decreased resolution.

Ken Crawford
Abstract: “Who Was That Masked Man”?;
We will cover the basics and advanced methods of using Masks to leverage the full power of Photoshop to create more detailed and dramatic images. I will demonstrate how to use refined masks to build up narrow band images, blend narrowband into LRGB, and boost color with precise and total control.

Jim Moronski
Abstract: The truth about all the untruth of Astroimaging;
As a result of the significant cost reduction of large format CCD imagers over the last decade, the average astronomy hobbyist can purchase technology that has previously only been available to big-grant research institutions or government organizations with large budgets. The science behind the imager and camera is often overlooked and taken for granted by the amateur. In addition, beliefs about system integration and best imaging practices have been born into legend leading to frustration from purchase to countless nights of system level debugging. Some of the myths and general recommended common practices will be discussed.

Jerry Hubble
Abstract: Title: How-to Obtain Your IAU Minor Planet Center Observatory Code;
This presentation will discuss the process the IAU Minor Planet Center (MPC) requires of astronomers to make the necessary observations, analyze, and report these observations to certify their observatory location as an official MPC observatory. Topics include: Discussion on how astrometry is performed, MPC process overview, observations required, technical requirements for astrometry measurements, reference stellar catalogs, software available to make measurements, analysis methodology, and MPC reporting requirements. The presentation will include examples used to certify the Lake of the Woods Observatory (MPC I24) in the spring of 2010.

Doug George
Title: MaxIm DL6
ABSTRACT PENDING

Dan Llewellyn
Title high resolution planetary imaging
ABSTRACT PENDING

Jay Ballauer
Abstract: How to Build an Astroimager;
Aimed at notice imagers, but helpful for participants at all levels, Jay will teach four very comprehensive 1 hour sessions. It will focus on developing the would-be “Astroimager,” showing how to maximize the potential of an image, from data planning and collection, to processing and final presentation. Best practices and tips will be given, intertwined with a healthy dose of imaging theory and philosophy, meaning that you will learn “why” good Astroimagers do what they do!
The four sessions are divided as follows:
Session One – The Tools of an Astroimager – Considerations for various imaging platforms will be presented, including deep sky setups, wide fields/time lapse, planetary/lunar, solar, and scientific. This will include a detailed discussion of video cams, DSLRs, and Astro CCD cameras, mounts, and optics. Software will be introduced, including a basic primer on their interfaces.
Session Two – How an Astroimager Collects Data – During this hour, you will see actual data and be able to gauge its quality and suitability. Topics will include auto-guiding, PEC, polar alignment, focusing, filters, image calibration, and binning. Optimal (and practical) sub-exposure times will be heavily discussed, as well as various acquisition software.

Dave Snay
Abstract: Image Processing Basics #1 & #2;
Dave will work through the basic steps to turn that hard earned data into an image you can be proud to share. He will use data sets for one or two galaxy images and possibly a star cluster (time permitting) image to demonstrate the steps to create an image from those faint smudges you see in your individual exposures.
Dave will also work through his process for generating a solar image from monochrome video taken through a solar telescope. You’ll be surprised how simple this can be.
You’ll see that there is more than one way to work the data to achieve great results. Dave will share his favorite tools to get the job done, including Nebulosity, PixInsight, Registax and Photoshop.


Evening Workshops

JP Metsavainio
Abstract: Tone mapping v2.0, principles and live examples about new features in TM v2.0;
Difference map , a basic function in TM v2.0 explained
Star colors and shades using a difference map
Dark and light noise handling by using a difference map
Fine tuning colors and shades
Tip and tricks
Questions and answers
After this lecture, I'll publish a basic tutoria for TM v2.0
Nighttime workshop;
A deeper look in Tone mapping v2.0
Many practical examples about implementing TM v2.0
Lots of tips and tricks
Deep look in a star removal procedure with practical examples
Example processing made to your image.
Please, bring a finalized 16bit color image in TIFF-format, if you like to see it processed publicly by TM v2.0 methods.

Preston Starr
Abstract: Building, Maintaining, and Operating a Remote Observatory;
I’m sure you can recall imaging nights where you shivered at the cold, held your breath at the eyepiece so as not to fog it, and tried to keep your freezing mind on your targets. Or, maybe you can recall the sweat pouring down your nose onto your eyepiece, while you slapped at mosquitoes attempting to feast on your Life’s Blood. I’m sure at times like that, you dreamed of owning a beautiful computerized, GOTO telescope, permanently housed in an observatory, which you could operate from the comfort of your home, comfortably seated at your computer.
My presentation will provide you with valuable tips to help observatory – whether located in your back yard, or hundreds of miles away. Some of the topics discussed will be: site and sky considerations, choosing the best observatory design, selecting the most effective telescopes, mount, and hardware for your applications, integrating software, along with maintenance and security. I will present a live demonstration illustrating two types of remote observatories, located in Texas. Also covered will be a discussion about “trying before buying”…where you can rent or lease a telescope at a remote facility before you make the final leap to build your own remote observatory.

2014 NEAIC Speakers, Talk titles,and Abstracts Day 2

Gordon Haynes
Abstract: Escape from Emerald City, the Hubble palette the way it should be;
One of the common problems when first starting out in narrow band imaging, particularly with the Hubble palette, is that images turn out predominantly green. The talk will look at the reasons why and look at a very easy to follow processing work flow consisting of just 7 stages to address this and reach the colorful hues associated with the Hubble palette while only using a handful of the many tools and plug ins available. This will be based on Photoshop.

Dolores Hill
Abstract: The OSIRIS-REx mission’s Target Asteroids! Citizen science project;
Dolores will discuss the exciting NASA OSIRIS-REx asteroid sample return mission to near-Earth object (NEO) (101955) Bennu and invite amateur astronomers to make observations for Target Asteroids!and Target NEOs!, the Astronomical League’s new observing program. These programs enlist amateur astronomers to observe a particular list of Near-Earth Objects (NEOs) and other Main Belt Asteroids (MBAs) of interest to the OSIRIS-REx science team and future spacecraft designers. She will discuss how a sample from Bennu will be obtained without landing on the asteroid and why sample return is important. OSIRIS-REx spacecraft will launch in 2016 with asteroid rendezvous in 2018 and sample return in 2023. This long-term mission provides many opportunities for serious amateur astronomers and those new to asteroid observing.

Jerry Lodriguss
Abstract: op 10 Secrets for DSLR Deep-Sky Imaging;
Learn the secrets of the best way to use your DSLR camera and computer to record Live View for high-resolution planetary Lucky Imaging of the Sun, Moon and planets.
Jerry will discuss the top ten things you can do to improve your DSLR high-resolution planetary imaging. Most of these tips will also apply to planetary imaging with any type of digital camera.Lucky Imaging records hundreds, or even thousands, of frames in a short video of several minutes length with special Live View capture programs. Some of these frames will by lucky and contain moments of good seeing. These are the ones we will use to create our final high-resolution image.

John Daves
Abstract: Image processing: The Right Tool(s) for the Job;
Processing astro images can be a complex task. It requires the right tool for the job, or the right tools. While there are many image processing programs offering impressive toolsets, each has their own particular strength. The toolbox in your garage probably has more than just a hammer, so why limit your astro toolbox to just one tool? In this class, I will demonstrate my entire processing workflow and my preferred software arsenal — CCDStack, PixInsight, Photoshop, and RegiStar. I will demonstrate why hopping between programs can actually make life easier… and result in some very nice images. Relative beginners should also benefit from this course, since a lot of what we will talk about involves developing one’s eye to identify “problem areas”, and then choosing the best tool to solve these problems.

Ted Blank, The International Occultation Timing Association;
Abstract:
Analyzing the light curve from an asteroidal occultation of a star turns out to be a surprisingly effective way to measure the shape and size of the asteroid. The data also can tell us a lot about the star being occulted - for example, whether it is a double star with components too close to be resolved optically. Furthermore, recording a star "winking out" from Earth is a whole lot cheaper than sending a spacecraft up to the asteroid. Each measurement of the occultation’s duration (the amount of time the star is not visible) measures one diameter or chord across the body of the asteroid. With many timings from multiple observers spread across the shadow path it is possible to reconstruct the asteroid's entire irregular silhouette. Additionally, these measurements provide a level of resolution that far exceeds anything that can be achieved with Earth-bound telescopes, sometimes down to +/- 1 km, or better than one part in one hundred million. This talk will focus on the tools and techniques used to analyze asteroid and Lunar occultations and Lunar grazes. Also, if the occultation of Regulus by (163) Erigone on March 20, 2014 was not totally clouded out in the Northeast, preliminary results from that event will be shown if available.

Rich Jakiel
Abstract: Introduction to Lunar Geology via Imaging;
With today's imaging platforms and a backyard telescope, the geology and geomorphology of the lunar surface can be now explored at resolutions thought only possible by orbiting spacecraft less than a generation ago. Using only images from my planetary cameras and a DSLR. I will discuss the lunar geology basics - including principles of lunar geochronology, geochemistry, the formation of the maria and ray formations, oblique impacts, craters and crater formation, crater chains, lunar tectonics (mountains & fault structures), lunar volcanism (sinuous rilles, lunar domes) and 'weird stuff' (librations, multiple fused craters, magnetic dust formations - etc). Areas of current amateur research (hunting for 'new' lunar domes and monitoring for impacts) will also be discussed.

Gaston Baudat
Abstract: SharpLock: A true real time auto-focus solution;
Auto- guiding and focusing for long exposures are challenging and critical tasks. For the first time both are integrated in one system and performed in real time using the ONAG® and SharpLock software controller: -1- Auto-guiding: The ONAG® from Innovations Foresight shares the same optical train and scope than the imager camera leading to a very wide FOV, with a minimum extra load for the mount. It avoids the differential flexure issues common with guide scopes, while providing access to the main scope’s large aperture for accessing higher magnitude guide stars. The ONAG® uses the near infrared light (NIR) for guiding effectively reducing the seeing impact on tracking performances. -2- Real time auto-focus: The ONAG® associated with the patent pending SharpLock technology provides a new, innovative and unique solution to deliver the sharpest images. It allows true real time auto-focus operations while auto-guiding, keeping the scope at its best focus all the time without any interruption of the imaging session. Any focus shift resulting from factors, such as temperature changes or load transfer, can be compensated immediately. There is no time consuming periodic auto-focus procedures anymore, nor any need to slew the scope to a reference star for re-focusing. It remains on target at best focus for all your frames. The guide star images seen through the ONAG® are used to assess accurately the focus quality, and also to provide directional information to the focuser controller. This allows the SharpLock algorithms to detect and correct any focus shifts well before they
may impact the image quality.

Jay Ballauer
Abstract: How to Build an Astroimager;
Aimed at notice imagers, but helpful for participants at all levels, Jay will teach four very comprehensive 1 hour sessions. It will focus on developing the would-be “Astroimager,” showing how to maximize the potential of an image, from data planning and collection, to processing and final presentation. Best practices and tips will be given, intertwined with a healthy dose of imaging theory and philosophy, meaning that you will learn “why” good Astroimagers do what they do!
The four sessions are divided as follows:

Session Three – How to Process Your Data – Strategies for yielding satisfactory images from your data are varied, but we will look at some of the basics imaging types, including grayscale, RGB, LRGB, H-alpha, and mapped color. Workflows will be discussed - image calibration, registration, and combination – as well as the best methods for “stretching” data, color balance, sharpening/blurring, and final image production.

Session Four – How to Polish Your Skills – This is “bonus material,” designed to give you something to think about as you advance through the ranks of the hobby. Included is a study of how ethics, opinions, education, and theory affect the growth of the Astroimager, and consequently, his or her imaging "program." We will delve deeply into artistic considerations, including properly framing an image, as well as an exploration of what makes images (and the process) special, repeatable, and enjoyable.

Dave Snay
Abstract: Image Processing Basics #1 & #2;
Dave will work through the basic steps to turn that hard earned data into an image you can be proud to share. He will use data sets for one or two galaxy images and possibly a star cluster (time permitting) image to demonstrate the steps to create an image from those faint smudges you see in your individual exposures.
Dave will also work through his process for generating a solar image from monochrome video taken through a solar telescope. You’ll be surprised how simple this can be.
You’ll see that there is more than one way to work the data to achieve great results. Dave will share his favorite tools to get the job done, including Nebulosity, PixInsight, Registax and Photoshop.

Evening workshops

Ken Crawford
Abstrect: Taking your images to the next level (two one hour sessions plus Q&A);
I will demonstrate my processing workflow starting with CCDStack and ending up in Photoshop with just a touch of PixInsight. I will explain advanced narrowband processing methods including the 6 filter color conductor, digging out the details, HDR Toning tool, and star management. We will end with final cosmetic touch-ups to create a dramatic, presentation quality image.

Martin Pugh
Abstract: High Resolution Astrophotography;
This talk will first examine software and hardware optimization as critical pre-requisites to producing both a high-resolution and high-quality astro photograph. Martin will touch on almost every aspect of these important requirements, introducing them in the form of a 'Battle Rhythm' approach so that fundamental steps are not overlooked. Thereafter, he offers a number of Photoshop fixes for the most frequent of imaging 'irritations' as well as reveal a number of post-processing finishing techniques that can make the final result APOD worthy!"

Man that was long!
:p :p :p

#19 Bob Moore

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 06:21 PM

12 Days left until the start of NEAIC 2014, the only! imaging conference in the US this year! There is still time to reserved you seat, Please see above for registration form, talk schedule, speaker names, and their talk abstract.

#20 shrevestan

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Posted 07 April 2014 - 10:27 PM

Going for the first time this year and can't wait!

#21 Bob Moore

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Posted 08 April 2014 - 12:52 AM

Welcome Stan you will have a blast! come and say hello!!

#22 shrevestan

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Posted 10 April 2014 - 10:39 PM

Day one and my brain is full from the speakers and my stomach is full from the Diner.

Success!






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