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SN in M82

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#26 Kevdog

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 10:43 AM

I managed to view it last night with my 15x70 BA8 (averted vision only) but not easy by any means! With the 20x110 it was easier and was glimpsing it direct on as the evening wore on and the galaxy climbed higher in the sky.
This is my first binocular observed SN :)


I'm in an orange zone and I was able to see it in a pair of (ironically) Nova 22x100 binoculars. It wasn't too hard to find, but it helped that I viewed it through my 18" scope first, so I knew exactly where it was. It was neat to see them in the 22x100's, just to know I could, but the view in the 18" at 170x was amazing!

I think magnification is important. I didn't get out my 15x70s to try, but I imagine I would have struggled, not because of the smaller aperture, but because of the smaller magnification.

#27 Jarrod

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 11:05 AM

My clear sky chart is looking good for tonight. I'm going to try your strategy of looking through my dob first, then 100mm and maybe 70mm binocs. Also will be trying to image in a 6" RC. I'm pretty excited that the sky might cooperate, if not the temperature (it was 0ºF here last night!).

#28 Damo636

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 01:31 PM

I managed to view it last night with my 15x70 BA8 (averted vision only) but not easy by any means! With the 20x110 it was easier and was glimpsing it direct on as the evening wore on and the galaxy climbed higher in the sky.
This is my first binocular observed SN :)


I'm in an orange zone and I was able to see it in a pair of (ironically) Nova 22x100 binoculars. It wasn't too hard to find, but it helped that I viewed it through my 18" scope first, so I knew exactly where it was. It was neat to see them in the 22x100's, just to know I could, but the view in the 18" at 170x was amazing!

I think magnification is important. I didn't get out my 15x70s to try, but I imagine I would have struggled, not because of the smaller aperture, but because of the smaller magnification.


Same here, I pinpointed it with the 12" dob so as to know exactly where to look. I don't think I would have got it in the 15x70 otherwise.

#29 Special Ed  Happy Birthday!

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 10:00 PM

I tried to see the SN tonight (8:30 PM EST) with my 15x70's but no joy. Transparency was good (4-5/6) and the skies were dark but the seeing was below average. Also the eyepiece end of the binoculars kept fogging up in the 1 degree F temps when I would put my eyes against them--that didn't help.

The brightest of the two 10th magnitude stars just to the south of M82 kept popping in and out--never could confirm the other of the pair. Using AV I suspected the SN once or twice (I knew where to look from my telescopic obs last week) but could never confirm to my satisfaction--might have been averted imagination.

#30 JustaBoy

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 10:56 PM

<yawn>

All this is such old news... You are all acting as if something new is happening, but in truth it was all over with 11 million years ago...

Back to bed...

<yawn>

:sleepy:

#31 kcolter

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 08:29 AM

Dazzling in the 20 inch Dob, visible in the Kowa Highlander with 50X eyepieces, no joy with 14X100 binoculars at a reasonably dark site in the American Midwest. Seeing it at the low magnification of typical binoculars is probably beyond my eyes.

#32 Jarrod

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 03:47 PM

Last night transparency here was excellent with average (at best) seeing. Went outside at dusk with all guns blazing. Started with the 8" dob and saw it very brightly in direct vision with the ES100 9mm but the ES100 5.5mm stole the show giving a spectacular view of not only the supernova but also showing a lot of structure in the galaxy itself. Very exciting view. Then I moved on to the APM100 with 8mm Hyperions (63x) and again saw it very clearly in direct vision ~95% of the time - 100% of the time with averted vision. Switching out for 15mm TS HD planetary EPs (33x), again saw it clearly in the APM100 with direct vision about 80% of the time - 100% with averted vision. Finally, scaled down to the BA8 15x70 mounted on a P-mount and no joy. Too much LP at my location for the 15x to bring the SN out. I tried throughout the night up to and including when it transited but never saw it in the 15x70.

Throughout this time and into the wee hours I also collected a total of around 6 hours of data through my 6" RC that remains to be processed. The subs look nice so I have high hopes that I'll be able to make a really good (for me) image out of that.

:yay: :thewave: :whee:

#33 Mark9473

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 07:02 PM

I saw the SN for the first time this evening, in my 107 mm apo at 20x. Found it just a touch more difficult than the foreground star next to M82. Every now and then the SN would wink out of view depending on how directly I was looking at it. It was obviously a lot easier seen at 70x in my Mewlon 210. I tried with my Docter 15x60, against all hopes really, and couldn't spot neither the SN nor the foreground star.

#34 Erik Bakker

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 08:03 PM

This morning, under very clear and dark skies, I observed the SN in M82 with my Nikon 18x70 when it was near the zenit. It is still brightening. The view was beautiful, with the SN visible with direct vision most of the time. I estimated the brightness at m 10.1 at 01.00 UT at 2014-2-2. It was ever so slightly less bright than the nearby m 10.0 foreground star, but much brighter than the 10.6 foreground star.

The 18x70 were well able to resolve the SN from the galaxy it is in. Two-eyed observing is very powerful indeed. The ability to see M81 and M82 in one field and than just focus my attention on the SN and resolve that from M82 was a delightful experience. Later on, I also observed the SN with my C5 in more detail. Somehow I preferred the beauty of the 18x70 views.

Tonight, both the C5 and 18x70 were better than my other scopes. Why? Because the were the only ones out under the stars. Big enough to really see something, small enough to actually put outside. It was a freezing cold, windy night and these 2 little instruments were just the ticket for some supernova-time :jump:

#35 RichD

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 04:40 PM

Finally got a break in the clouds here and caught it in a 5" mct. Very easy to see and forms a neat line with the two foreground stars. My first supernova! Very,very cool thing to see and in one of my favourite galaxys to observe. I didn't try in a bino as the clouds were encroaching.

#36 Jarrod

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 10:29 PM

Finished processing.

Attached Files



#37 JustaBoy

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 10:34 PM

Jarrod,

Did you process out the 2 little red lines?

BTW - Great Pic!

#38 Jarrod

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 10:42 PM

Thanks. No, I had a red line filter installed in my imaging train ;-)

#39 Erik Bakker

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 03:16 AM

That is a beauty Jarrod :bow:

Visually, the SN appears yellowish to my eyes. That color is what also shows in your image. Could be some dust in M82 the light is passing through or the color of the SN itself. Anybody know?

Last night, 2014-2-2 22.30 UT, under slightly less transparent skies than the last nights, the SN was a bit more difficult to observe in the 18x70, but still there most of the time. In the FS102 and MW 16" f/5, the SN looked like it may have reached it's brightness peak. Less bright than the close 10.0 star and almost as bright as the 10.6 star, I estimated it at around Mv 10.4.

#40 RichD

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 04:09 AM

Yes, due to dust in M82 it's a reddened supernova. Would be approx Mag. 8 if seen "in the clear".

#41 Erik Bakker

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 04:29 AM

Thanks Rich!






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