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Why do we like classics??

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#26 bierbelly

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 04:33 PM

Cause we're old?

#27 Bomber Bob

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 04:38 PM

"Cause we're old?"

I prefer to say, "experienced."

#28 vismundcygnus

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 04:48 PM

I don't know a whole lot about all of the excellent classic scopes out there. I am fairly new to astronomy and still getting started. I bought a new scope for and enjoyed it, but I had problems with all the plastic on it, and it seemed to hinder the performance. While I was getting pretty great views, I wasn't happy with the way I interacted with the scope. It felt nice but cheap. I sent that back and ended up getting an old Tasco 6TE-5. I halved my aperture, but I really love that little scope. Everything is metal, including the focuser knobs. The tabletop stand is all metal. It is in excellent condition, even 50 years or so after it came out.

I guess the reason I like classic scopes is like my car. I had a 97 Saturn which I sold to buy a 91 Volvo 240 wagon. Most people don't get it.

#29 starman876

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 04:59 PM

oh oh back to cars again :lol:

#30 Bomber Bob

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 05:11 PM

Here's Bomber Bob's potential 3rd (and final - I mean it!) vintage refractor, a Meade 4" f/15 from the 1970's:

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#31 Bomber Bob

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 05:13 PM

I understand that Tom Colwell had one --> http://www.cloudynig...1840944/page...

#32 mooNSpy250

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 05:25 PM

Well,I think you all have answered my questions, and I too share many of these motivators to buy classics..

Thank you all

#33 Bomber Bob

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 06:09 PM

With all the Cave threads on the forum, here's one that could tempt me:

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#34 akman1955

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 07:57 PM

oh oh back to cars again :lol:


:question: Did someone mention CARS...beep beep :lol: :grin: :help:

#35 Bomber Bob

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 09:50 PM

CN to the rescue! Didn't know the model number, but with a bit of help & searching, I found the 1978 Meade 447 - a Towa version of a Unitron original --> http://www.cloudynig...1318629/page...

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#36 TexasSky

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 10:17 PM

Wow.....awesome.....
Here's my 2 cents on why we like the classics.....for some of us it is because we can finally afford what we only dreamed of as a youth.....for some it is because they are just plain cool.....for some it is because we recognize the quality per dollar value.......for me, it's all the above!!
Newbie bob

#37 starman876

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Posted 29 January 2014 - 10:31 PM

that is an awesome scope.

#38 Chuck Hards

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 09:24 AM

One reason I like the classics is that I can read the instruction manual without my eyes glazing over and dropping into a digital-jargon-induced coma. ;)

#39 actionhac

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 11:53 AM

I know what you mean Chuck. I used to think I could handle anything until I tried to turn on my Meade LX200 GPS UHTC 7"Mak Smartfart 2.0V.
I just want to unwind under the stars.


#40 mooNSpy250

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 05:15 PM

I agree with you Newbie bob, I guess there are several factors that drive us to the classics.. I think they are a great bargain if selective of condition, although some really like the restoration aspect of the classics I see..

#41 Dr Morbius

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 05:24 PM

Yup, still looking for a 10" to 15" Clark refractor that some college is going to scrap - you know there still are barn find Duesenbergs and Packards out there!

#42 p jaeger

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 05:34 AM

Because they are old, withstood the test of time, their design and performance. They never fail to impress and gain ones respect. In the case of my Criterion RV-6, it has the ingredients of a classic. From its ruggedness and simplicity of design to its precision setting circles and clockdrive (which btw still functions 40 years later). It never failed to perform. The range of materials used to produce the scope also demonstrates the thought that went into making it: cast aluminum, galvanized steel, machined steel and brass, Bakelite, and Pyrex. The pier and mount sat outside in both blistering 90-100+ heat and cold rain drenched winters for years covered by a canvas US mail bag. Both the scope and eyepieces survived being pointed at the sun and projecting its image during eclipses. Optics so good that some people asked to look down the tube to prove that I did not have a model or picture of Saturn hanging inside of it -LOL! At a cost of $215 in 1974, it could not be beat and it is still operational as I type. One of my nephews will probably inherit it.

#43 rcwolpert

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 09:58 PM

I miss my 1964 RV-6. I wish I never gave it away. Thanks for the description. Right on point.

- Bob

#44 Michael Rapp

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 10:48 AM

Here is why I have an interest in classic scopes.

For me, it is not so much about the scopes but what those scopes represent. It is in large part about the cliched longing for a perceived simpler time, at least in amateur astronomy, that I did not get the chance to participate in. There were fewer options back then, so the siren song of constantly getting new/better stuff was quite a bit muted compared to now. People were more content with what they had and observed more intimately with it, it seems to me.

I'm highly romanticising here, but it seems in that age people were more involved with the object they were observing than the equipment being used to observe. Nowadays, it is all too easy to have the observing "aids" (gotos, DSCs, iPads, SkyFi, etc, computer charts...even Mallincams) automate oneself right out of the hobby.

Also, during that era, the sense of the unknown at large scales was still present on objects readily accessible to the amateur. Even as late as the mid-1950s, respected amateurs were still writing about the possibility of vegetation on the Moon.

My interest in classic scopes has actually intensified in the last few years for a curious reason. As I approach 40 (eee gads!) I realize I'm no longer in my twenties when I worked all the time. I need boundaries now between my work life and my hobbies or else I will burn out. As my work involves the highly intricate nature of computers, I'm seeking to make my hobbies less electrically-oriented. So, I think my recent searching for a 60mm refractor of that era is in part of my desire to connect with a time in which we didn't have IC circuits in every nearby physical object!

#45 Joe Cepleur

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 02:00 PM

For me, it is not so much about the scopes but what those scopes represent. It is in large part about the cliched longing for a perceived simpler time, at least in amateur astronomy, that I did not get the chance to participate in. There were fewer options back then, so the siren song of constantly getting new/better stuff was quite a bit muted compared to now. People were more content with what they had and observed more intimately with it, it seems to me.



+1; spot-on!

My brother's master's thesis was about a leisure theorist (there are such folks!) who said that Americans used to be happy with being and doing, but had come to believe they would be happy with having. They thus worked all the time to become able to buy things, only to find that they tired themselves too much to enjoy using what they had bought.

A better image is a laudable goal, and a few scopes of different types may be necessary to see all the sights, but using whatever decent scopes one has is surely more realistic and rewarding that worrying forever about lacking the latest in an ever-evolving marketplace.

#46 Geo31

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 09:29 PM

Speaking only for me, it's not about simpler times, but simple, basic, instruments. Easy to use. No training wheels. If one has the knowledge, one can go anywhere in the sky, find almost anything with a basic scope and a finder.

I like simple, but well engineered and executed. THAT is what I like about classic scopes.

#47 Ziggy943

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 10:17 PM

Worked for me. :)

#48 TexasSky

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 10:42 PM

This might be obvious.....but a lot of the enjoyment I get is just in the hunt for them.....they are well built beauties.....and are in a way like classic cars, "not built like they used to be".......classic looks and materials....like chrome on a vintage beauty........we all know modern scopes in most cases are better optical performers....same as a modern car is a better driving vehicle.....but they don't turn heads and have the same admiration as a classic......and just offer a different type of satisfaction in ther use...... :smirk:
Bob

#49 Geo31

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 10:49 PM

Uh oh.... Not that I (or others) disagree with you, but it seems cars are verboten on this forum (despite the obvious parallels).






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