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My sketches in lecture/narration at WSU & TV News

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#1 markseibold

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 12:13 AM

To all
http://www.youtube.c...h?v=cKw8wTZ_Lpg

(Please Move cursor to 5:23 mins on time bar in this TV News)

This may be a little unconventional as a single post, but I was recently asked to lecture for two full days of work at WSU Campus North of Vancouver Washington. It is a beautiful newer extension campus 10 miles north of Vancouver WA with Mount St Helens looming near on the north horizon where we also soon plan a huge star party for students.

I was performing on 3 hours sleep that day as day two of about 6 one and half hour lectures to full classes of students showing much of my sketch-work and aside form so much, my original 35mm camera, I demonstrated the difference of using a Dobsonian vs. a GOTO Celestron Nexstar 5i, a short video was played by the teacher in a Powerpoint Presentation of the 100 hours sound files while I interviewed hundreds of people on my 10,000 mile solo road trip in 2000 with a 8" Cassegrain fitted with h-alpha. That later film is also here from the lecture. Here is also my distant viewing camera running an excerpt of the lecture during the beginning 12 minutes. A few interested students questions can be heard throughout, yet the English teacher prompts me as like an interview at times >
http://www.youtube.c...h?v=NnCKZEFEC78

Enjoy,
Mark Seibold

#2 Asbytec

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 12:32 AM

Taking notes with pictures, lines, color, and blotches. I love it. :)

#3 kenrenard

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 06:58 AM

Mark,
Very interesting. Wish the first segment gave you some more time. Your sketches are always amazing. Would love to see them in person.

I did a read along with my daughters second grade class and brought in a telescope. The kids were so excited they were jumping up and down and never stopped with questions. They even started asking if they would die traveling to a distant galaxy because of the distance! It's amazing even how much 7 year olds grasp. I can only imagine the questions from young adults.

Keep up the good work.

Ken

#4 markseibold

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 11:33 AM

Asbytec and kenrenard

Thanks for your sincere responses. The TV news reel (first link above) is rather short but I felt that it was quite succinct in what they chose to edit and allow me in speaking if only for 20 seconds about the importance of observing and sketching in education. Imagine that I talked non-stop about everything from personal observing in my early life with my first bought 60mm Tasco Refractor, to my first astro photos at age 13 with a Kodak Box camera in 1967, to then putting all this on sabbatical during a marriage and raising a family, building a home, then only returning to the astronomy for the public in 2000 when losing my career of over 25 years, then the art although in humble beginnings as a child artist, the serious astronomy art only started in October 2006, after seeing a sketch of the sun by the moderator here at Cloudy Nights, Erika Rix. At first seeing her sketch in spaceweather.com, I did not know where to go to praise her work and tell her how it changed and inspired me to want to sketch more than ever. So the teacher wanted me to relate to the students, all of my inspirations as to why I was doing the astronomy and then the art, as I spoke much more for up to and over an hour and a half lecture, then repeated this entire lecture 4 or 5 more times over two days, with a question asking period at the end of each session.

In the second link that runs a 14 minute excerpt, my own digital camera running, you'll notice that as I talked about what observers remarked as to the image of the sun through the h-alpha telescope when I took it onto the US-Canadian sidewalks in 2000 for over 10,000 miles and recorded peoples responses, some in many foreign languages,
http://www.youtube.c...h?v=jVtxx7kC_LI
a young lady student in the class remarks at about 4:01 that the sun through the h-alpha reminds her of a favorite Johnny Cash song and then she sings it. She relates and her fellow students react with laughter. Of all the responses across the continent and hundreds that I recorded in audio, a young student or child will come up with the most honest and creative remarks that I have ever heard. :cool: And I thought that there was nothing new under the sun. Although I told some mild jokes as I have watched the serious astronomy lectures of Richard Feynman and how he lightly jokes about people in his lectures.

I hope to do this again soon as it is almost like the sidewalk astronomy, where you have no idea how the class will react to so many images produced by hand as technical art. By about 5 minutes on the time bar, [listen] as the teacher and I are fiddling with the Powerpoint Projection to show the students the audio recorded responses as I allowed hundreds of people across the nation the live image of the sun through the h-alpha telescope- the full class begins to chatter as they us struggling with the equipment. By 7:23 and 7:30 the images of the sun I first sketched for the spaceweather and APOD sites are shown, and this prompts the teacher to ask about a large lunar sketch and why my first solar sketches include my hands. I explain the Cloudy Nights sketch forums starting at about 9:00 and why at first the moderators here did not want me to include my hands in my sketches. The teacher shows these works that we had compiled to the Powerpoint Projection program prior to the class. She asks me to describe how I sketch from the eyepiece. As I explain looking through the 10 inch Dobsonian, noting the earths rotation and having to realign the telescope often, I then move to the Celestron Nexstar 5i [goto] show the motorized feature of the equatorial tracking, finally mentioning why Dobson would prefer to have you learn by doing the tracking manually. That lecture was in late November, not knowing that a little over a week ago we would lose him. I told the students that three figures that I most admired were Chesley Bonestell, Richard Feynman and the only one still living is John Dobson. I plan to go to his memorial on a long road trip to Hollywood by February 23rd. I last visited him for his 95th birthday in 2010, not knowing that my large pastel sketch I made of him with the moon was being video recorded > http://www.youtube.c...h?v=-A1cirEj2fU

-Mark

#5 kenrenard

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Posted 30 January 2014 - 12:51 PM

Mark,
Another interesting video. I admire John Dobson very much and would have loved to met him. Quite a Moon sketch with John Dobson.

One of my favorite things is to get out and show others the wonders of the night sky.

I totally agree with you how much sketching something helps. I just started about 2 years ago and have little in the way of artistic talent but can see how much my observing has improved.


Thanks for sharing your video's and insight from your lectures.


Ken

#6 Uwe Pilz

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 12:55 AM

Thank you for that link. Nice to see you "in real".

#7 markseibold

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Posted 01 February 2014 - 08:47 AM

Uwe
Danke! un you are wilkommen. Also see the longer 2nd video link of me actually talking to the students for quite awhile (15 minutes), as we exchanged many questions and answers, also with the English teacher.

Asbytec
Sorry I missed your name earlier Norme, now I realize it is you! :cool:

Ken Renard
Yes, and a better online image of that huge sketch of Dobson is here in my DP Review photos hosting site->
Large Image Pastels and Photographic Art in Mark Seibold Gallery of DP Review

... at the DP Review link above, either click the image twice or click to Slideshow-Start in the upper mid front page tool bar above the horizontal thumbnail index, then in next window click Fullscreen at top left tool bar, wait for full image to load a few seconds.

-Mark






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