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Jupiter 2-11-14

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#1 kenrenard

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 06:41 AM

Hello All,
I was able to observe Jupiter last evening with binoviewers in my reflector for the first time. I was able to get some great views even with some thin clouds. Cold and 9F at the time of sketch with winds gusting to 20. Some interesting features.

SEB showed a split with some swirling.
NEB wider and swirling on the preceding end
EZ showed numerous festoons with one large looked to go up to the SEB
NTEB and NNTEB were both visible
STB also showed
STZ with some ovals.

I also noticed a whitish oval on the NPR.


Ken

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#2 Asbytec

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 06:51 AM

Ken, you are on a Jovian roll. Yea, that's the ticket.

A split SEB? I gotta see this. No doubt part of the split is the wake, the other (southern half) is some brighter clouds. They may be the same ones I glimpse in part, but to see them across the belt from end to end musta been sweet.

Looks like a great observation, it's a nice rendition of it.

#3 Chopin

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 07:41 AM

LOL! Ken, i have to echo Norme here, you are in a mode of Jupiter obsession! 9ºF, bro!! With wind!!! Okay, this is awesome. You are really just starting to crack the tip of the iceberg with these binoviewers. Good catch with the large oval in the NPR.

How do you rate the overall observing experience with two eyes? Better in every way? Or do you find any drawbacks vs mono viewing? I actually prefer DSO's in the BV as well. I find that even the dimming of the views can be compensated for by lowering the power over what you would use in mono, since two eyes seem to give a false sense of scale increase anyway.

Back on topic, this is a fantastic sketch, Ken! It has a great sense of realism with the flushed presence of the festoons and the fine rippling of the split SEB. Awesome.

#4 Asbytec

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 08:19 AM

Ken, the nicer Jove get's, the harder the obsession sets in. I say, roll with it...let it take you where it wants to go. You will be rewarded.

The withdrawals last about two weeks...:lol: The memories, a life time.

#5 dweller25

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 08:31 AM

That's a superb observation Ken, thanks for sharing it.

#6 kenrenard

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 08:37 AM

Thanks Guys,
I really am amazed with the binoviewers. I can't believe how good it is. I still am learning what the magnification is I am using the WO binoviewers with the 20mm eyepieces. I need a 2x barlow to reach focus and I also used the 3x for this as well. I was about 300X I would estimate with judging from my monoview at 240x.

Jason,
I just think binoviewing is amazing. The Moon is in a different league. Like flying over in a space ship. I really saw so much more with Jupiter. I tried to capture it all but just couldn't. I have to try some more Lunar sketches with the binoviewers.

Norme,
I saw the split SEB in some of Paul Abel's sketches and with last nights view I could disern the detail myself. I recently flocked my tube with protostar flocking as well as collimated and cooled. I think that all helped.


-6 F right now and expecting more snow.


Ken

#7 Asbytec

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 09:01 AM

It does, Ken...especially the cooling and collimation. All of it adds up to what seeing will allow. Again, nice one. Your best, I think

#8 Scanning4Comets

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 10:49 AM

Wicked sketch! :bow:

Nice detail!

#9 frank5817

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 12:09 PM

Ken,

Wonderful detailed sketch. I looked for stray marks caused by a shivering hand (9F!). There are none. You have anti freeze for blood.

Frank :)

#10 niteskystargazer

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 12:40 PM

Ken,

Very nice sketch of Jupiter on Feb. 11th :).

CS,KLU,

:thanx:,

Tom

#11 kenrenard

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 02:21 PM

Thanks Frank, Mark, and Tom,
I had a ski mask, hat and gloves which helped for sure. Seeing the awesome view with my new Binoviewers helped.


Ken

#12 Dean Norris

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 03:52 PM

Ken,

Great sketch of Jupiter. Those upgrades to your scope are all paying off. The SEB looks interesting, a new development. Good catch on the ovals.

Dean

#13 Tommy5

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Posted 12 February 2014 - 07:32 PM

Very nice Jupiter sketch, good detail thanks for sharing.

#14 kenrenard

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 06:33 AM

Thanks Dean and Tommy,
I was looking at the imaging forum and can see what the split is looking like through a picture. It's showing as several different colors with the split. I attached the link to the image forum. I now see its much more complex than my pencil sketch, but I am still happy I am seeing that level of detail.



http://www.cloudynig...6371877/page...


Ken

#15 Asbytec

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 07:19 AM

Yea, Ken, I think that makes sense. What you're seeing is two different hues. You are good at seeing color, so it was probably more apparent to you. My gosh, man... :grin:

#16 kenrenard

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 01:54 PM

Norme,
I think thats more the case it was hues not a true split. Always interesting to see what we come across. Snowing good here today. No changes to see anything but flakes!


Ken

#17 Asbytec

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 05:56 PM

Well, you know..its all about hues and the difference between them anyway when we resolve stuff on Jupiter. So, yea, be it a true split or a dot in the southern polar region, it's all about seeing color. I guess that makes it a true split whether it's grey or white or black or mauve. Seeing that grey or reddish hue in the SEB is a low contrast feature you managed to observe. That makes your observation fascinating.

#18 kenrenard

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 07:28 PM

Thanks Norme,
I am very pleased with my observations. It's great to get such a compliment. I really feel us visual observers still have some valuable observations to make. Luckily we now can view a picture to see what we do see. Where in times past folks never knew for sure, they needed to trust their eyes. This is what makes it so fascinating is that we see these small changes with our eyes and modest equipment.

Still snowing good with winds whipping.

Ken

#19 Asbytec

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 07:39 PM

...they needed to trust their eyes.

We still do. :)

Images are great for showing us something was there, but not always so great (depending on how they are processed) telling us what it 'looks' like nor defining what we can see. This is especially with 'highly processed' low contrast Jovian features.

#20 kenrenard

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 07:52 PM

Good points Norme I am happy to be able to see what I can. I have to say the binoviewers have really made an amazing difference. I can't wait to look at the Moon and planets again. I find just observing and sketching is one of the most calming things I do. Just looking and saying to myself, Wow there's an oval, look at that festoon I now get a I kick out of reading when folks say they can't see anything and need a new scope. It comes down to looking for hours and years to see more. If you only look for 10 seconds no scope will help.

Hope you get some good clear skies.

Ken

#21 Asbytec

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 08:08 PM

Ken, exactly right. Observing is a lot like recreational diving. Look at that, look at this. It's beautiful and we get to see it. It does require time and effort, hours at night and years of learning to observe through experience. Sketching is a relaxing thing. A bit of work, but with a cup of coffee it's relaxing. We just love to share what we enjoyed seeing. A sketch is always about the observation, it's the way we communicate an image of the beauty we see.

#22 Tamas Bognar

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 01:16 AM

Very nice work, Ken.

#23 kenrenard

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Posted 14 February 2014 - 02:58 PM

Thanks Tamas,

Hope you get some clear skies.

Ken






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