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HDX-110, EQ8 meridian

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#1 wpage66

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 01:37 PM

Looking at the new HDX-110 and feel it might be just what I need when I get by Obs set up when the cold weather is done.

Two main questions that I have.
1) has anyone been able to determin if it will pass the meridian when imaging, if so how far. Other mounts CGEM do I think up to 2hr. I have searched the manual (orion - version) and not found any reference to it.

2) the SkyWatcher version list GPS as in the controller but nothing on GPS on the HDX ver, or is it just not listed in the manual as a feature.

This looks very interesing. On my short list with LX850, CGE pro, HDX-110. Going to pull the trigger on one by June to mount on peir.

Wayne

#2 Geo.

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Posted 13 February 2014 - 04:32 PM

Pages 27-28 in the CGEM manual. Flip - in the default setting the mount will continue to track past the Meridian according the RA slew limits that have been set.

RA Limits - the limits that the telescope can slew or track in Right Ascension (R.A.) before stopping. The default slew limit is 0º, being the position when the Dec axis is horizontal. The slew limits can be set to automatically stop anywhere between 40º above level to 20º below 0º. Tracking stops at the set or default limit. Selecting goto will flip the meridian again to center the object.

#3 Dan Crowson

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Posted 16 February 2014 - 03:45 PM

Wayne,

I think tracking through the meridian would have to do with your setup. For example, with my Atlas, I can track for hours past the meridian on some targets but only 20-30 minutes for others because my camera would hit the tripod.

Dan






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