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What kind of views are you going to get with 8"

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#1 Chris Ward

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 02:41 PM

What kind of view of planets and DSO are you going to get with a 8" Parabolic lens telescope?

Thanks

#2 Pinbout

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 03:05 PM

with my smooth 1/4~ undercorrected 8in dob, even when jupiter was about 30* above the horizon, I got some amazing detail in the bands.

I had to wait for moments for the air to stop moving and then viola 4 secs of crisp detail, then air currents blur it up, then wait...the air stills and viola, wow.

all in my 1/4~ undercorrected, nice edge, smooth mirror, the secondary is at least 1/8~.

#3 Mirzam

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 03:26 PM

PLanetary views in an 8" can be excellent as long as the atmosphere cooperates and optical quality, collimation, and thermal management are all attended to. For DSO's there is plenty to see, but the best views will under dark skies and on brighter objects. Faint DSO's need a bit more aperture to show detail, although hundreds of objects can certainly be detected.

JimC

#4 Astrojensen

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 03:38 PM

An 8" can show tens of thousands of deep-sky objects, if the observer is skilled and the sky dark and clear. Many hundreds of objects will show some degree of details, with dozens showing lots of details.

The Moon will show myriad craters, rilles, mountains and countless other things.

The major planets will all show lots of details, given good seeing.

There are thousands of double stars within the resolution limit. A few show orbital motion in just a few years.

The Sun (with a proper filter) will show minute-to-minute changes every day, all year. Sunspots will show fantastic details.

An 8" scope can be the scope for a lifetime. You will never run out of things to see. No one alive has ever seen more than a fraction of what is within the reach of an 8" scope.


Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

#5 stevew

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Posted 24 March 2014 - 09:49 PM

What kind of view of planets and DSO are you going to get with a 8" Parabolic lens telescope?

Thanks

If you are considering an 8 inch lens, you will get more answers in the refractor forum.

#6 LateViewer

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Posted 25 March 2014 - 07:18 PM

When I was looking for a first telescope, surfing the web for information, I read somewhere, "nothing under 8".

An 8" will give awesome views of the planets the moon and the entire Messier catalog and then some.

In other words you cannot go wrong.

Al

#7 Astrojensen

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 05:45 AM

I read somewhere, "nothing under 8".



Lies and slander. You can start with something significantly smaller and still get rewarding views or you could start with a 16" and be met with nothing but disappointment (I've seen both cases IRL). It depends solely on the observer's attitude and expectations.


Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

#8 Jon Isaacs

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 06:00 AM

I read somewhere, "nothing under 8".



Lies and slander. You can start with something significantly smaller and still get rewarding views or you could start with a 16" and be met with nothing but disappointment (I've seen both cases IRL). It depends solely on the observer's attitude and expectations.


Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark


So very true. Satisfaction and disappointment depend on the observer and not the telescope.

That said, I think Al's intent was simply to reaffirm your comments, that indeed an 8 inch is a very capable scope, it can be the scope for a lifetime.

Jon

#9 LateViewer

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 08:34 AM

Hey guys, I own two much smaller scopes and they are great. 92mm and 66mm refractors. And yes I was just affirming that 8" is great size.

I think an 8" Dob at the general price point in the retail world is a great value.

Al

#10 Starman81

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 01:49 PM

Very nice, satisfying views with 8" scopes with commercial optics. My 8" dobs put up better overall views than my 8" SCT did. Both were satisfying though.

#11 Phillip Creed

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 04:55 PM

The 8" f/6 is by far the best-bang-for-the-buck in this hobby. That's enough aperture to really open things up on planets and DSO's (under dark skies), it's very portable, very affordable, and at f/6, it's easier on eyepieces (and eyepiece budgets!) than larger models with =/< f/5 mirrors.

Clear Skies,
Phil

#12 GeneT

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 10:07 PM

The 8" f/6 is by far the best-bang-for-the-buck in this hobby. That's enough aperture to really open things up on planets and DSO's (under dark skies), it's very portable, very affordable, and at f/6, it's easier on eyepieces (and eyepiece budgets!) than larger models with =/< f/5 mirrors. Clear Skies, Phil


I agree with Phil. Also, a three or four inch refractor could be considered.






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