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Great binos for Shore Viewing 0.1-2 miles distance

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#26 NorthWolf

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Posted 28 March 2014 - 09:15 AM

No idea why this would be put in the cloudy nights and microscopes section either, I thought it was going in a bird watching/nature section... My main reason for using binoculars is for Astronomy, nature is 2nd, so whatever I may have asked about in here helps me in some way to choose which binoculars for Astronomy as well...just saying. I will specify in the opening of this thread that my primary use will be Astronomy if that helps.

#27 KennyJ

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Posted 29 March 2014 - 05:31 AM

NW,

It's easy to have binoculars attached to a tripod and mount for use from sitting positions.

Simply adjust the tripod legs accordingly!

I used to have a "cycle pack" that comprised of lightweight tripod/ video head, spotting scope, L-bracket, and lightweight folding chair, complete with drinks holders in the arm rests!

I kept low power binoculaers around my neck, with just the scope attached to the tripod.

Of course, unlike most users, I prefer STRAIGHT through spotting scopes to angled.

Kenny

#28 kcolter

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Posted 30 March 2014 - 09:20 AM

My opinion is the same as that of North Wolf and Andresin. I don't really see a need to move a disussion like this to what I perceive to be a more obscure and less visited forum. Perhaps I just need to be more diligent about checking this forum. I also am first and foremost an astronomer. Using the binoculars during the day helps me justify having them, and all addicts have to rationalize their addictions, mais non?

#29 KennyJ

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Posted 01 April 2014 - 04:31 PM

The move would have made more sense 8 to 10 years ago, when this was exclusively a forum for discussion of daytime use of binoculars and scopes, at a time when many well-informed members contributed regularly to the forum.

Kenny

#30 Joe Ogiba

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Posted 03 April 2014 - 01:06 PM

You could get the new 15x56 SLC and hand hold it or better still braced. Then mount it to make out more detail. I agree that 8x32 or 10x32 EL SV are great hand held.

If you don't mind IS binoculars, 15x50 Canon would be my first choice along with 10x42 IS. Either one handheld.

If I tripod mount for long distance, my preference is to use a binoviewer on an APO refractor. But higher power may not be that useful if there are water heat currents.

I agree with that and add a 21mm Ethos with erect image prism diagonal in a large scope gives great 100 deg AFOV views with one eye viewing that is almost a good a bino viewing .

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#31 NorthWolf

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Posted 19 April 2014 - 07:52 PM

https://suite.io/joh...atchford/v2f2ap

One of these would work great, got to love the FOV!

https://www.astronom...ulars_c560.aspx

https://www.astronom...ulars_c338.aspx

#32 KennyJ

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Posted 20 April 2014 - 03:12 AM

Hi NorthWolf,

Blatchford ought to have also mentioned that around 99% of all zoom binoculars ever made are rubbish!

Regarding the models you provided links to, I will repeat my advice from around a month ago, just in case you forgot.

< Sea spray and sand blowing from beaches can cause damage to binoculars, so I always used a combination of 7x50 Marine binos and waterproof spotting scope.

To see any detail on smaller objects 3 miles away really requires magnification of up to 60x, so again the combination of the two waterproof instruments in tandem always provided the most fullfilling experiences.>

Kenny

#33 Ian Robinson

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Posted 21 April 2014 - 12:10 AM

I have been known to take my 20x80s with me when fishing along Stockton Beach (about 30km of unbroken beach) that has 4x4 access via the dune field or unofficially via some fire trails near Stockton.
They are treat when rested on the window for spotting schools of tailor (via the presence of seagulls and terns) from a few km away viewed from a high dune.

Also handy for peeping on how other beach fishermen are going (are they catching anything ?).

And there is an added benefit, if I am beach fishing at night, if it's quiet (and dark and mist free) I can use the binos to stargaze between jewfish runs (these can a long time apart most nights).

#34 NorthWolf

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Posted 23 April 2014 - 01:39 AM

Hey Kenny, what about these:

http://www.amazon.co...ZPGS/ref=sr_...

Does this feature count as zoom? Do you like auto focus?

•Sports-Autofocus system puts everything into focus from 20 yards to infinity

http://www.amazon.co...imeter/dp/B0...

https://www.astronom...ars_p19722.aspx

http://www.amazon.co...PU/ref=sr_1_...

http://www.telescope...avannah-Pro-...

#35 KennyJ

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Posted 23 April 2014 - 04:53 PM

NW,

Auto- Focus has absolutely nothing in common with zoom, apart from the fact that BOTH types of binoculars are better avoided, at all cost!

Any of the others would cover the lower-magnification aspects, but for me, when using only 7x or 8x binoculars in the daytime, if pressed, I prefer a wider AFOV field of view than what the majority of 7x50s have to offer.

Kenny

#36 NorthWolf

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Posted 23 April 2014 - 10:41 PM

What about these Pentax with 60degrees of AFOV?

http://binoculars.to...oculars-review/

#37 KennyJ

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 03:17 PM

Yes, that Pentax model appears to be very good, especially for it's price.

The one year only warranty is slightly off-putting, given that all the other models in that selected ten carry 10 year warranties.

Kenny

#38 Mark9473

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 03:56 PM

Auto- Focus has absolutely nothing in common with zoom, apart from the fact that BOTH types of binoculars are better avoided, at all cost!

Well, with Steiner the "auto-focus" feature is just marketing-speak for individual focus. There's nothing wrong with IF just as long as you realize that's what you're getting.

#39 NorthWolf

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 07:33 PM

http://www.birdwatch...chart_2011.html

:thinking: :thinking: :thinking:

It's either 8x42 or 10x42 it seems...cmon guys...which one for whale watching? No tripod, hand held, good distance, crystal clear...If I test them at a store, will it matter that I will be viewing city sights... At least I will feel and test them right?

#40 azure1961p

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 09:11 PM

For all you've said Id recommend Nikon Monarchs in 8x42 if tripod is a non option. What's a little unfortunate in passing on a tripod is that views across water can stand high magnifications no binoculars can touch. You'd be counting barnacles on the flukes on the best days with a refractor within your budget.


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#41 NorthWolf

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 09:48 PM

Hey Pete, the problem is that I have to do a lot of scanning most of the time, and when you do find something, you still have to keep moving around because these whales never take a break! They'll come to the surface, breathe, take a small dive and come back out in 5-20 seconds depending on what type of whale and you have to keep guessing and following them. What would you recommend in that case?

#42 azure1961p

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 08:13 PM

As a guy who has gone to the shore dozens and dozens of times with my 8x42 binos and 70mm refractor - Id still take the refractor. For what you just described Id put in the 26mm plossl giving 18x (a polarizing filter if needed due to glare) and Id pan left and right looking for whale tails, spouts and spy hops. Where I go though - whales are a tall order - none ever seen but Ive seen on several occasions the nuclear subs leaving or entering new london - conning tower and all. THAT'S a sight. Beyond that its the distant lighthouses, cormorants 7 miles out airing their wings on rocky shores etc.

Had I whales coming through though and scanning and panning were in the mix Id have both binos and refractor. I could be wrong here as Im projecting and you've already done it so you know your needs. That 18x view though is broad and very very tack sharp. I believe if I used a 35mm ocular or 32mm Id have 15x for even wider angle. I'm projecting here but Id get the refractor.

Pete

#43 NorthWolf

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 12:24 AM

Is your view much wider with the 26mm plossl at 18x in the refractor compared to 15x70 binos with a 4 degree view? Would you use a massive 100degree eyepiece instead? Or even 70-82? I just don't see myself with a refractor sitting down around there, there's many families etc near by, maybe if I buy land there for sure, I'll have a 10" dob pointing to the sea I don't care. But for now I'm really trying to keep it simple with some hand held binos.

If you're sitting down on a rock or chair, on a campsite, looking the sea for a whale coming out every 5-50 minutes, anywhere from 10 to 2000 meters distance, what is your bino of choice?

#44 KennyJ

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 03:28 AM

If objects one hopes to momentarily glimpse through binoculars can appear at any moment, out in the sea, at any distance between 50 metres and 2000 metres, then probably the best bet is to use binoculars that provide perfect focus throughout that range, at the same time.

Individual Focus 7x50 Marine binoculars are probably the most suited for such applications, due to their superior depth of field.

Kenny

#45 NorthWolf

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 06:20 AM

Good idea Kenny! That's very true. I remember having to constantly re focus every time I would scan with the 10x50 tasco essentials.

Won't the individual focus eyepieces be a handicap for this though? I'll go research those marine binos..

#46 KennyJ

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 02:28 PM

The eyepieces on my 7x50 Marine binoculars have been set in exactly the same positions for around 7 years now, with tiny strips of tape to mark the positions.

At these settings, they instantly focus on any object from around 100 yards away to the distant stars.

Kenny

#47 NorthWolf

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 04:18 PM

Which ones do you suggest than, and do you if any ED ones exist? http://www.bhphotovi..._Marine_Bino...

#48 KennyJ

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 04:39 PM

As is the case with leading manufacturers such as Swarovski, Zeiss, Leica, Nikon, Fujinon etc, I'm sure most manufacturers of marine binoculars don't even bother resorting to "potential sales gimmicks" such as advertising "ED" glass.

I very much doubt "ED" glass would make much difference with 7x magnification, anyway.

It certainly wouldn't be very high on my list of specifications.

The Steiner looks alright, but it's probably no better than my Helmsman, which was especially selected and named for Captain's Nautical by a person who knows more than most about binoculars, but whose name I hesitate to even mention any more on these forums, as every time I do, I receive a rather unpleasant PM from a moderator or admin.

Not all Steiners are made in Germany, and that particular one has an even narrower field of view than the more common 7.1-7.3 degree TFOV that most 7x50s tend to have.

Kenny

#49 NorthWolf

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 04:47 PM

What about these? :) http://www.captainsn...4/Captains.html

#50 KennyJ

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 04:57 PM

The First Mate model is a step up from the one I have.

The other one has a croos-hair reticule, which would probably be superfluous to your requirements.






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