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QHY5L-II Settings

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#1 sazam

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 01:12 PM

Hey everyone,

I was attempting to try my Atik OAG with the QHY5L-II guide camera couple night ago but couldn't manage to get an image. I haven't gotten the right spacing yet which I may try fixing during the daytime with very short exposures. When selecting the Late ASCOM driver on PHD, a separate menu appears for the QHY where one can adjust the gain settings. What gain setting should I use or should it be left at the default value of 12%?

Thanks,
Sal

#2 Orion64

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 02:27 PM

Good question, I was meaning to post this question a while back. And also, I think it depends on the binning. I have heard that on 2x binning, gain is left almost at 0. Don't know, will wait for the pros to comment.

#3 petemumbower

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 02:28 PM

I use my QHY5L-II with my Orion TOAG and use the default setting in PHD2. My exposure time is 2sec and it seems to work pretty good. I would recommend putting a bright star in the main FOV and then an eyepiece in the OAG and slewing the scope until that bright star is in the center of the OAG. Then put the camera in and focus. Of course this has to be down once the main camera is in perfect focus.

#4 Rick J

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 02:42 PM

With any guider I ever used I wanted as much gain as I could get without random noise being a problem. Not using PHD I assume it can subtract a dark from the guide exposures to minimize noise. Then set gain to bring up the faintest stars without creating a hot pixel the guider might mistake for the guide star. While this might saturate a really bright guide star there should be plenty of fainter ones to choose from that aren't saturated. Least I never had a case where I couldn't find a suitable guide star when pushing gain to the maximum.

Rick

#5 sazam

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 02:51 PM

Thanks for the replies!

Its going to take a lot of trial and error to figure the right spacing out.

-Sal

#6 Rick J

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Posted 26 March 2014 - 03:02 PM

For finding the focus use a piece of tissue paper as a view screen and some bright source like a street light a few blocks away or the moon when available. Rack focus in and using the paper it is quick and easy to see where focus is as you watch the object get larger or smaller. Takes only seconds. Once you know where in space it is it is easy to determine if spaces are needed and if so how much is needed.

Rick






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