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"Craters of the Near Side Moon" by John Moore

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#1 kraterkid

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 10:41 AM

John Moore has written what appears to be a must have book for lunar observers, "Craters of the Near Side Moon". After viewing his YouTube video, I immediately ordered my copy. When I receive it, I'm going to give it my honest appraisal and post it here and in the "Astro Art, Books, Websites & Other Media" forum.

#2 Astrojensen

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 03:01 PM

This looks like a fantastic, must-have book for us lunar observers.


Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark

#3 pdxmoon

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Posted 11 April 2014 - 04:00 PM

I bought it too. Can't wait.

#4 desertstars

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 06:27 PM

Money is a bit tight at the moment, so an impulse buy isn't going to happen. But I have a birthday coming up, and unsubtle hints for gift ideas have been dropped.

Looking forward to seeing what you guys think when you get your copies.

#5 cbwerner

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 11:19 PM

I'll look forward to hearing your reviews. It's a bit disappointing that it's only available in paperback though.

#6 kraterkid

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 09:38 PM

I just received my copy of John Moore's new lunar atlas "Craters of the Near Side Moon" self published by CreateSpace. Before I even opened the book, I was impressed by its weight (coming in at around 3.5 lbs.) and the sheer number of pages (714). Although it has a modest 7" x 10" page size, it has a well organized and clean page presentation.

The forward text includes a succinct illustrated outline of the three major phases of crater formation and a discussion of lunar history with respect to impact size and frequency. There is a nice photographic near side map that shows the lunar coordinate system grid and a list of lunar statistics related to its orbital and physical properties. Full page quadrant maps are clearly labeled with names of the major features as well as the positions and names of lunar landing missions. The adjacent page is a list of the major quadrant features. To my surprise and delight, John has included an East-West Limbs and Far Side map as well as North and South Polar maps near and far side. Again these are clearly labeled with major features and coordinate grid. These are followed by a lunar phase chart with a calendrical list of all the quarters by date, from 2014 to 2018 including eclipses.

The body of the atlas are the named craters listed in alphabetical order. The position and size of the crater is prominently listed. The black and white Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) photographs consist of the view from Earth's perspective, the area overview showing the position and nomenclature of the immediate region, and an overhead view. There is also a small graphic of the full Moon with an little square that gives you a way to instantly determine the general location of the crater. The printing resolution is very good, and it's obvious that John spent many hours adjusting the image parameters so they would be consistent throughout the book. Each page also has a chart that lists the longitude and latitude positions and sizes of the sub craters. There is even a small blank area set aside for the reader to jot notes about the crater. The descriptive text is clearly written, containing a brief discussion of the attributes and age of the crater along with lunar geological processes that may have influenced its morphology. John often mentions aspects that make the crater interesting to the visual observer, something many will find useful at the eyepiece.

The end of the atlas contains photographs and lists including positions of other major lunar features such as crater chains, mountains, rilles, marshes, maria, lakes, capes and valleys. Notably absent was a list of domes though John mentions these in the text and the very extensive index.

It is quite apparent from the quality and quantity of its images, text and data, that John Moore has produced an atlas that will be a valuable resource for selenology and a "must-have" for anyone who loves the Moon.

#7 azure1961p

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 09:46 PM

This will certainly be my next astronomy book purchase. Thank you for the heads up.

Pete

#8 kraterkid

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 10:42 PM

Thanks Pete. I know you'll love this one. John put his heart and soul into this monumental tome, it is quite evident throughout.

#9 pdxmoon

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Posted 19 April 2014 - 01:18 AM

I've also received mine, and could not be more delighted. I look forward to lots of use. This is the atlas I've been dreaming of!

#10 kraterkid

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Posted 19 April 2014 - 10:16 AM

My feelings exactly Thom!

#11 NeilMac

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Posted 19 April 2014 - 06:38 PM

It does look like a great book, gonna have to save up for it now :)

#12 desertstars

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Posted 21 April 2014 - 02:33 PM

I'll look forward to hearing your reviews. It's a bit disappointing that it's only available in paperback though.


That's pretty standard for self-published work, unfortunately. Very few of the outlets available to independent authors will do hardcover, and those that offer the service charge an arm and a leg for it. If you design the book just so, you can publish through CreateSpace with no up-front costs - though I'd be willing to bet Mr. Moore used some of the optional services for this one. (A bit less straightforward than publishing a novel. ;) )

#13 desertstars

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Posted 21 April 2014 - 02:34 PM

I just received my copy of John Moore's new lunar atlas "Craters of the Near Side Moon" self published by CreateSpace. Before I even opened the book, I was impressed by its weight (coming in at around 3.5 lbs.) and the sheer number of pages (714). Although it has a modest 7" x 10" page size, it has a well organized and clean page presentation.

The forward text includes a succinct illustrated outline of the three major phases of crater formation and a discussion of lunar history with respect to impact size and frequency. There is a nice photographic near side map that shows the lunar coordinate system grid and a list of lunar statistics related to its orbital and physical properties. Full page quadrant maps are clearly labeled with names of the major features as well as the positions and names of lunar landing missions. The adjacent page is a list of the major quadrant features. To my surprise and delight, John has included an East-West Limbs and Far Side map as well as North and South Polar maps near and far side. Again these are clearly labeled with major features and coordinate grid. These are followed by a lunar phase chart with a calendrical list of all the quarters by date, from 2014 to 2018 including eclipses.

The body of the atlas are the named craters listed in alphabetical order. The position and size of the crater is prominently listed. The black and white Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) photographs consist of the view from Earth's perspective, the area overview showing the position and nomenclature of the immediate region, and an overhead view. There is also a small graphic of the full Moon with an little square that gives you a way to instantly determine the general location of the crater. The printing resolution is very good, and it's obvious that John spent many hours adjusting the image parameters so they would be consistent throughout the book. Each page also has a chart that lists the longitude and latitude positions and sizes of the sub craters. There is even a small blank area set aside for the reader to jot notes about the crater. The descriptive text is clearly written, containing a brief discussion of the attributes and age of the crater along with lunar geological processes that may have influenced its morphology. John often mentions aspects that make the crater interesting to the visual observer, something many will find useful at the eyepiece.

The end of the atlas contains photographs and lists including positions of other major lunar features such as crater chains, mountains, rilles, marshes, maria, lakes, capes and valleys. Notably absent was a list of domes though John mentions these in the text and the very extensive index.

It is quite apparent from the quality and quantity of its images, text and data, that John Moore has produced an atlas that will be a valuable resource for selenology and a "must-have" for anyone who loves the Moon.


Okay, if you're that pleased with it, I'm sold! :cool:

#14 genethethird

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Posted 21 April 2014 - 02:40 PM

This is the one I think I've been waiting for. Ordered!

#15 NorthWolf

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Posted 21 April 2014 - 07:26 PM

Very nice, will buy a copy someday!

#16 MrJim

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 08:53 PM

I just watched the You Tube and immediately ordered the book. It looks magnificent!

#17 kraterkid

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 10:55 AM

You're going to love this atlas Jim, John has put an amazing amount of work into this massive tome!

#18 MrJim

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 07:30 PM

You are right Rich, this is a beautiful volume!

#19 genethethird

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Posted 09 May 2014 - 11:33 PM

Yep, it certainly is.

#20 kraterkid

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Posted 10 May 2014 - 01:49 PM

Jim and Gene, I knew you guys would love this one. Sometimes I'll be looking up a crater and find myself caught up in reading about another that is listed on a facing page, his descriptions are so very interesting. I really like the way John draws attention to aspects that are observable with amateur telescopes.

I am concerned that some will have to wait as CreateSpace Amazon prints new editions, I understand that the book is no longer listed as in print by Amazon.com and I have not heard about what length of wait time you may have if you are looking to purchase a copy. Any updates would be nice to hear about.

#21 kraterkid

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Posted 10 May 2014 - 07:35 PM

Well, since this atlas is a CreateSpace Amazon published book and is printed per the demand, it has now been printed and appears on Amazon Books as available, so no worries about being able to purchase a copy.

#22 jonbosley

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Posted 21 May 2014 - 11:33 AM

A book! I remember those.

#23 desertstars

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Posted 21 May 2014 - 01:30 PM

I am concerned that some will have to wait as CreateSpace Amazon prints new editions, I understand that the book is no longer listed as in print by Amazon.com and I have not heard about what length of wait time you may have if you are looking to purchase a copy. Any updates would be nice to hear about.


POD doesn't work that way. There's never a stock of books, as they are literally printed as needed. The oddity with the Amazon listing has two probable explanations: an error or glitch in the Amazon site, or the author submitted updated manuscript files that needed to go through the approval process. The latter seems the more likely of the two. If he decides to correct an error or add a crater, the book might be unavailable for the day or two it takes the system to process the files.

#24 kraterkid

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Posted 22 May 2014 - 10:52 AM

Thanks Tom! So it really is Print On Demand.

#25 desertstars

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Posted 22 May 2014 - 01:41 PM

Quite literally. If someone hits it big and their book is selling hundreds of copies a day, CreateSpace might print a pile in anticipation of future sales, but that rarely ever happens.






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