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Can someone point me to the cleaning your CAT?

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#1 seawolfe

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Posted 01 May 2014 - 05:46 AM

I just got a new white light solar filter and so finally got to see my corrector in the daytime. :grin: Bleah, it is in need of GENTLE cleaning but I can't seem to find a thread on how to do this. I KNOW that I've read about it here in the past but my search isn't turning anything up.

Please help me Obi-wan...you're my only hope. :roflmao:

#2 rmollise

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Posted 01 May 2014 - 08:39 AM

Well, young Padawan, let us assume it really needs cleaning. That you have examined it under normal room light, not in bright oblique light.

What you need:

1. Original Blue Windex.
2. Original white Kleenex (no lotion).
3. Canned air.

1. Blow off the loose material with the canned air, holding the can upright and 18-inches away.

2. Wet a Kleenex with Windex (don't spray on corrector) and swab outward, changing tissues frequently. When it looks clean, dry with Kleenex.

3. Use the canned air to blow off any lint left behind.

4. You are done. May the Force be with you, Youngling.

:jedi:

#3 mogur

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Posted 01 May 2014 - 04:42 PM

Water, cats do not like! :kitty:

#4 T1R2

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Posted 01 May 2014 - 05:59 PM

there's also directions in the* Articles* section on CN under "How To" called "Cleaning and Modifying the C11 Beast" you have to scroll down a ways to find it, its a 9 part tutorial, just click on the section you need

#5 m1618

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Posted 01 May 2014 - 06:10 PM

I've read here once of a recommendation of plain Viva brand paper towels. They are like thick original Kleenex. Agreed blue Windex. I'd like to add that a follow with distilled water worked for me for the mirror and corrector. I'll have to post a pic of my rescue cat before pic when I find it.

#6 St Pete Keith

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Posted 01 May 2014 - 09:16 PM


How to give a cat a bath




1. Thoroughly clean the toilet.

2. Add the required amount of shampoo to the toilet water, and have both lids lifted.

3. Obtain the cat and soothe him while you carry him towards the bathroom.

4. In one smooth movement, put the cat in the toilet and close both lids (you may need to stand on the lid so that he cannot escape).
CAUTION: Do not get any part of your body too close to the edge, as his paws will be reaching out for any purchase they can find.

5. Flush the toilet three or four times. This provides a 'power wash and rinse' which I have found to be quite effective.

6. Have someone open the door to the outside and ensure that there are no people between the toilet and the outside door.

7. Stand behind the toilet as far as you can, and quickly lift both lids.

8. The now-clean cat will rocket out of the toilet, and run outside where he will dry himself.

Sincerely,

The Dog

#7 Mariner@sg

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Posted 01 May 2014 - 11:16 PM

How to give a cat a bath




1. Thoroughly clean the toilet.

2. Add the required amount of shampoo to the toilet water, and have both lids lifted.

3. Obtain the cat and soothe him while you carry him towards the bathroom.

4. In one smooth movement, put the cat in the toilet and close both lids (you may need to stand on the lid so that he cannot escape).
CAUTION: Do not get any part of your body too close to the edge, as his paws will be reaching out for any purchase they can find.

5. Flush the toilet three or four times. This provides a 'power wash and rinse' which I have found to be quite effective.

6. Have someone open the door to the outside and ensure that there are no people between the toilet and the outside door.

7. Stand behind the toilet as far as you can, and quickly lift both lids.

8. The now-clean cat will rocket out of the toilet, and run outside where he will dry himself.

Sincerely,

The Dog


I'm sure the SPCA has loads of comments on that method! :)
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#8 rolo

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Posted 02 May 2014 - 01:01 AM

My cat cleans itself...

#9 Raginar

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Posted 02 May 2014 - 07:42 AM

http://www.arksky.org/asoclean.htm

I like Doc Clay's method.
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#10 jhayes_tucson

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 07:19 PM

This thread has been dead a while but I've noticed that the issue of Windex comes up over and over again.  Today, while attending the SPIE conference in San Diego, I spoke with Scott Powers at Newport Thin Films Laboratory about cleaning coated optics.  His number one recommendation for cleaning coated optical components is isopropyl alcohol.  He also said that methanol, and acetone are generally safe depending on the contaminant that you are trying to remove.  MEK can be used but it has environmental & health concerns so it probably shouldn't be used unless there is a special reason to use it.  He said that the one material that can damage coatings is ammonia because it attacks magnesium-floride.  He specifically indicated that Windex along with other commercial window cleaners often contain ammonia and should never be used to clean coated components.  Mag-floride is a very widely used high performance anti-reflection (AR) coating material and it is commonly used on most eyepiece lenses, corrector plates, and objective lenses.  Windex also sleeks, leaves a hazy film, and costs more than isopropyl alcohol so there is no reason to ever use it on any high quality optical component.

 

John


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#11 Pitter

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Posted 06 September 2014 - 06:31 PM

For me...the only time I have had problems with streaking or persistent film, is when I have used isopropyl alcohol of any dilution on a corrector.   I am another happy windex man and have never done any damage to my correctors or coatings. 


Edited by Pitter, 06 September 2014 - 06:31 PM.


#12 TCW

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Posted 09 September 2014 - 08:07 PM

If you have to use Windex, dilute it with distilled water. Pure isopropyl alcohol 91% or better is also good. Filter everything through a coffee filter to remove suspended particles and dust.

 

I just made a batch of the ASO cleaning mix and it worked perfectly on a bunch of eyepieces and filters.   I did substitute a drop of clear dish soap for the Photoflo though.



#13 *skyguy*

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Posted 10 September 2014 - 08:15 AM

I've used the homemade cleaning solution and method recommended by Meade  to clean SCT correctors for the past 15 years. In a pint bottle mix 1 part isopropyl alcohol (91% or better), 2 parts distilled water and add 1 drop of liquid dish soap ... use unscented Kleenex tissue to apply and wipe off. All my compound telescope correctors, refractor objective lenses and even eyepieces still look factory new ... no sleeks, no streaks, no scratches!








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