Jump to content


CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.

Photo

OneSky Newtonian - Astronomers without borders

  • Please log in to reply
1274 replies to this topic

#1251 OrdinaryLight

OrdinaryLight

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 749
  • Joined: 06 Nov 2013
  • Loc: Massachusetts

Posted 22 July 2015 - 09:52 AM

Mike,

 

I use my OneSky with a Bogen/Manfrotto tripod and Universal Astronomics DwarfStar head: http://www.theopport...ky-travelscope/

 

There are several mid-level photo tripods that could work and a few options for compact astro heads. A setup like this costs considerably more than the Versago II but is light weight and very compact.


  • Mike R likes this

#1252 Mike R

Mike R

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 9
  • Joined: 03 May 2015
  • Loc: Dallas, TX

Posted 22 July 2015 - 10:02 AM

Thanks Dave! I took a look at your travel setup and it looks like that could be a solid and light weight option. 



#1253 Abhat

Abhat

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1397
  • Joined: 14 Dec 2013
  • Loc: Central Maryland, USA

Posted 22 July 2015 - 11:54 AM

 

 

I took my OneSky out last night and had some great views with it and Andromeda looked surprisingly good, considering my suburban Dallas location. After I get 'er collimated a little better I was seeing some nice crisp stars. The optics are pretty impressive for the price of this little thing!

 

I plan on taking it with me later this summer when I go on vacation - does anyone have any good portable / travel tripods they can recommend for this scope?

 

That must be a relatively dark suburb!  I can't see Andromeda as more than a big fuzzy blob.

 

If you're handy with a saw, you could build this tripod platform.

 

 

No, it's definitely a fuzzy blob, but I saw it! As bad as the light pollution is here and as low in the sky as it was, I feel like that was an accomplishment.   :lol:   Yeah, I've looked at that tripod platform before and it looks great, but what I need is something I can stuff in a (pretty large) suitcase and take on an airplane, or maybe something small enough that it'll fold up as a carry on. 

 

Anyone have any suggestions? I've been looking at this one: http://www.telescope.../35/p/10105.uts but I'm open to suggestions. Thanks folks!

 

I do use the Onesky with Versa Go II and both of them work together quite well. They have one under clearance section for $147.


Edited by Abhat, 22 July 2015 - 11:55 AM.

  • OrdinaryLight and Mike R like this

#1254 CyberCowboy

CyberCowboy

    Sputnik

  • *****
  • Posts: 46
  • Joined: 16 Mar 2015

Posted 23 July 2015 - 08:23 AM

Thanks Jlandy, that is indeed what I'm missing.  I store the AWB in a video camera bag (one that was mentioned earlier in this thread) so collapse it after every viewing, I'm sure they (I'm missing both) fell of at some point.  I'll swing by a hardware store and see what I can grab



#1255 MSimmons

MSimmons

    Vendor - Astronomers Without Borders

  • -----
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 113
  • Joined: 17 Oct 2008
  • Loc: California, USA

Posted 23 July 2015 - 09:44 AM

Weird, you can see in your picture where the plug would thread into... MSimmons and thoughts? It seems like a missing part to me

 

Sorry, I've been busy. I saw this and I have a damaged OneSky here I can play around with but it seems jlandy beat me to it.

 

Let me know if there's anything I can help with.

 

Mike



#1256 CyberCowboy

CyberCowboy

    Sputnik

  • *****
  • Posts: 46
  • Joined: 16 Mar 2015

Posted 23 July 2015 - 09:58 AM

Mike is there anywhere I can order just that part from?  I'd rather have the piece designed to go there since I show the scope off fairly regularly at community out-reaches.



#1257 MSimmons

MSimmons

    Vendor - Astronomers Without Borders

  • -----
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 113
  • Joined: 17 Oct 2008
  • Loc: California, USA

Posted 23 July 2015 - 10:00 AM

You can write to products@astronomerswithoutborders.org and ask about getting the parts. There should be damaged scopes that they can be pulled from. Let them know you talked to me about it. If there's any problem let me know.

 

Mike


  • jlandy likes this

#1258 CyberCowboy

CyberCowboy

    Sputnik

  • *****
  • Posts: 46
  • Joined: 16 Mar 2015

Posted 23 July 2015 - 10:13 AM

Thanks mike, I sent them a message with the photo attached.  I did say to talk to you if there were any questions.  I hope that's ok



#1259 MSimmons

MSimmons

    Vendor - Astronomers Without Borders

  • -----
  • Vendors
  • Posts: 113
  • Joined: 17 Oct 2008
  • Loc: California, USA

Posted 23 July 2015 - 03:39 PM

I wrote to the person who will handle this about how to get the part. If there's any problem let me know. It will take a while -- our person is on vacation and there will most likely be delay on the other end -- but it should get there.

 

Mike



#1260 CyberCowboy

CyberCowboy

    Sputnik

  • *****
  • Posts: 46
  • Joined: 16 Mar 2015

Posted 23 July 2015 - 04:17 PM

Thanks Mike, no worries on the delay, I can still use the scope if I push the supports from the back without a problem.



#1261 stargazer193857

stargazer193857

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • Posts: 2507
  • Joined: 01 Dec 2013
  • Loc: Southern Idaho

Posted 26 July 2015 - 04:41 PM

How steady is the Onesky table dob mount? Suppose I sit on the ground next to it, aimed at the zenith, looking at the Cignus Milky Way, and a 5-10mph breeze comes through. How much vibration would there be? In my Celestron Powerseeker 114mm alt az, the shaking definitely detracts from the view. Part of why I like telescopes over binoculars is the steady view. 

 

If there is any unsteadiness, what area is the weak link? Is it the single alt bearing? If I added on on the other side, would that improve it much?


Edited by stargazer193857, 26 July 2015 - 04:42 PM.


#1262 Tony Flanders

Tony Flanders

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 12560
  • Joined: 18 May 2006
  • Loc: Cambridge, MA, USA

Posted 27 July 2015 - 05:01 AM

How steady is the Onesky table dob mount? Suppose I sit on the ground next to it, aimed at the zenith, looking at the Cignus Milky Way, and a 5-10mph breeze comes through. How much vibration would there be? ...
 
If there is any unsteadiness, what area is the weak link? Is it the single alt bearing? If I added on on the other side, would that improve it much?

If a 10-mph breeze came up, you would never know the difference. The OneSky is quite steady against a breeze. Especially if set on the ground.
 
The scope does vibrate a bit after moving it from one place to another, and when focusing. This came as a surprise to me, since the StarBlast 4.5, on a precisely identical mount, doesn't vibrate at all. But obviously whatever vibration there is is amplified by the much longer distance from pivot to eyepiece, and probably also by the truss system. Two trusses is pretty minimal ...
 
In his S&T review, Gary Seronik estimated the settling period at 2.5 seconds. That sounds about right to me. Much faster than most cheap scopes, but not in the same league as a full-fledged Dob. I'd say it's a very minor issue indeed except when focusing at high power.

Gary also says in that review that he traced the vibrations to the rubber-tipped feet. I haven't tried to verify that.

For what it's worth, adding a second bearing on the opposite side would be a huge engineering job. It would be especially hard to do this without compromising the ability to rebalance the scope and/or remove the tube.



#1263 dwheels

dwheels

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 61
  • Joined: 25 Jan 2015
  • Loc: Orange county, Calif.

Posted 27 July 2015 - 01:12 PM

Tony -- I reinforced the OneSky mount as shown in the photos below.  It's much stiffer now.  The plywood is 1/2 inch luan and the strips are oak. I had removed the rubber feet and could see no difference.

 

basef
baser
 
Don

 



#1264 stargazer193857

stargazer193857

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • Posts: 2507
  • Joined: 01 Dec 2013
  • Loc: Southern Idaho

Posted 28 July 2015 - 12:35 AM

I don't understand how the Onesky eyepiece is so high up, when the Starblast 6 eyepiece is only 30 inches up. The Onesky should be close to 5 inches lower. Is the eyepiece end of the Starblast so much heavier compared to the Onesky that it allows the tube to sit lower?

 

Is it possible to move the dove tail with at most some simple drilling to get the eyepiece angled to the side? If the truss polls were side by side instead of one above the other, would eyepiece weight cause them to bend?

 

I'm interested in a wide angle scope for panning the sky, finding stuff fast, and looking at the Pleiades and M31 whiile still having the ability to zoom in closer. My plan is to sit on the ground next to it, maybe with a cushion under me. My first thought is that the Starblast 6 would be tall enough, but the Onesky would not be tall enough. Then I'm told the Onesky is too tall for some, with the zenith eyepiece near 36 inches. I just don't understand how that is possible with a 26" focal length scope.

 

My field of view must show the Pleiades fully and with some black space around them for a pretty view. I have a 32mm Plossl and plan to upgrade to a 24mm ES68. Both give 2.06 degrees in the Starblast 6, with the Pleiades at 1.83 degrees. That is a little close for comfort but might be the perfect scope, making each star as bright as possible with some nebulosity. Or maybe the Onesky would frame it better.



#1265 stargazer193857

stargazer193857

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • Posts: 2507
  • Joined: 01 Dec 2013
  • Loc: Southern Idaho

Posted 28 July 2015 - 12:47 AM

Pros:

The difference in cost between the Onesky and the Starblast 6 is equal to the cost of the 24mm ES68. I suspect the dovetail and could let me raise it to the right height, and counterweight could balance the eyepiece.

 

Cons:

Repositioning the dovetail might be out of my reach.

If the truss is on its side instead of vertical, could it handle a 16oz 24mm ES68?

 

 

 

I've seen the Orion nebula through my 25x70. It looked good in it. I'm sure at 130mm it would look better and not dramatically better at 150mm. I've seen the nebula with an 8", and the extra aperture allows more magnification while staying bright. I'm still not lugging 40 pounds around or asking people to make room in their car for it or paying $400 right now. I also don't want to hunt for stuff with the narrow field of view of a 1200mm focal length scope. I'd  rather spend more time looking at stuff I find quicker, even if the view is smaller.



#1266 stargazer193857

stargazer193857

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • Posts: 2507
  • Joined: 01 Dec 2013
  • Loc: Southern Idaho

Posted 28 July 2015 - 12:53 AM

 

Tony -- I reinforced the OneSky mount as shown in the photos below.  It's much stiffer now.  The plywood is 1/2 inch luan and the strips are oak. I had removed the rubber feet and could see no difference.

 

 
 
 
Don

 

I doubt the wooden joint is the weak point. I'm sure a 4 legged or folding table is the weak point. The next place I would look is az bearing: make sure all three points are snug. Unless the rubber is really soft and squishy, I just don't think that is what would have the most play.



#1267 Tony Flanders

Tony Flanders

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 12560
  • Joined: 18 May 2006
  • Loc: Cambridge, MA, USA

Posted 28 July 2015 - 05:36 AM

I don't understand how the Onesky eyepiece is so high up, when the Starblast 6 eyepiece is only 30 inches up. The Onesky should be close to 5 inches lower. Is the eyepiece end of the Starblast so much heavier compared to the Onesky that it allows the tube to sit lower?


Where do you get that 30-inch figure for the StarBlast? Have you measured it?

I measure the OneSky eyepiece at 28 inches above the ground with the scope pointed to the zenith and balanced to my taste. There's a pretty big gap between the bottom of the tube and the base of the mount. No doubt the eyepiece end of the StarBlast is indeed much heavier; a solid tube is much heavier than two trusses.

Why is a 28-inch-high eyepiece too high when I measure my eye height at 33 inches? Probably several reasons. First, I repeat, the biggest problem is not when the scope is pointing to the zenith, but when it's pointing about 60 degrees up. At that position, the eye lens is actually higher than when the scope is pointing up.

Let's do the math. I measure 15 inches from the pivot point to the secondary mirror. The eye lens is probably about 5 inches from the center of the secondary mirror using the 25-mm eyepiece. A bit less with the 10-mm EP, much more with a Barlow.

So we have a 15-5-16 right triangle, where the eye lens is 16 inches from the pivot point and the angle between the scope's axis and the line connecting the pivot point and eye lens is 30 degrees. That means that the eye lens is at maximum height (29 inches) when the scope is pointing 60 degrees up.

At that angle, you have to bend over considerably to look down into the eyepiece, which lowers your head height a lot. Moreover, you have to bend over somewhat to look into the eyepiece even when the scope is pointed at the zenith. If you're sitting absolutely erect, your crossed legs will collide with the base.

The eyepiece of the OneSky is at a poor angle for viewing from a sitting position, only 15 or 20 degrees from vertical. That forces you to be behind the scope when it's pointing high in the sky. That's fine when you're standing, but for sitting it's much better to be off on the side of the scope. If you could rotate the tube even as little as 20 degrees, it would alter the scope's ergonomics dramatically, making it much easier to use from a sitting position.



#1268 stargazer193857

stargazer193857

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • Posts: 2507
  • Joined: 01 Dec 2013
  • Loc: Southern Idaho

Posted 28 July 2015 - 08:26 PM

Well, I've decided I want a 2.5 degree fov to frame the Pleiades well and fit all the dust lanes of m31. A 150mm does not do that without a 2" focuser and 2" eyepiece.

 

So now I just need to decide whether to buy a solid 130mm ota and build my own mount, or modify a Onesky. Lighter weight and lower price is nice. I don't think a 6" scope is worth twice the price of a 130mm.



#1269 aFleaByte

aFleaByte

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 2
  • Joined: 29 Jul 2015
  • Loc: N. Houston, TX

Posted 30 July 2015 - 12:09 PM

Hello Cloudy Nights!

 

I have read this entire thread during my free time over the past month. I have learned alot and have done a few things listed. I live on the north side of Houston, TX and have only looked up at night and wondered. Zero experience with telescope or even reading the sky in any sense. I understand how planets move and the sky changes throughout the year but haven't learned the constellations by sight yet.

 

I got my OneSky ordered on a Tuesday and it was delivered on Friday. Awesome shipping queue.

 

Right out of the box the extra screw in the bag was put in the dovetail. RDF was thrown on and rough adjusted. Venus and Jupiter were getting lower and the clouds were moving in from the west so I was in a rush. 25-15° above the horizon (just a hair above the tree line) I found Venus quickly. A good 1/3rd was hidden due to the shadow but the terminator line was vivid and crystal clear. Slightly right and down for the next brightest dot was Jupiter. The 95°F temperature and the height of the planet made it really wavy in the EP. But I did manage to get a picture of of it with a terrible cell phone. (Not too good but noticeable) 

 

JL5SZv3.jpg

 

Clouds moved in with a vengeance so the viewing was over for the night. Saturday was a new day (July 4th, 2015). Family has land in a blue zone (according to Dark Sky Finder). Had plenty of time while the burgers and steaks were cooking to have a gander at looking at properly collimation of the primary, secondary and RDF alignment. After the mirrors were finished I found a tree about 1/4-3/8 of a mile away and began with the RDF. During the adjustment I noticed a friend that I couldn't see with my naked eyes. (Sun hitting the secondary really affected the image)

 

x1z7mE5l.jpg

 

Later that night with the stock EP's, I  had my whole family gathered around a 4 legged stool and when they saw Venus the first response was "why is the Moon so small in that?" I had to have a little explanation (drawn in the dirt) of how we can see a planet closer to the sun than us and also see another planet much much further away just by adjusting the telescope a little.

 

Once turning toward Jupiter and a slight focus adjustment this was the first time I was able to make out the bands on the surface. My eyes aren't the greatest but the image was clear enough with the 10mm to make out 7 or 8 different color bands as well as 3 bright and crisp moons. Slowly the excitement and upward open mouthed gazing started to become commonplace. After the viewing the sky started to darken, tiny dots were showing up 1 by one. Everywhere you turned the was a point of light and the longer you looked and your eyes got more and more accustomed to the darkening sky's, the points of light were not countable.

 

Taking a small break to help ourselves to another coating of mosquito repellent. I got to looking around for stars that didn't twinkle. I saw an orangish dot that wasn't sparkling. It was slightly up and to the right of 4 bright stars, I used the RDF and pointed in the direction. I was not ready for what I saw. It was Saturn. The planet just floating out there and the gap between itself and the rings were extremely clear. During the excitement I didn't look too long in the eye piece because I didn't think I saw what I saw. Yep, there it was, Saturn in all it's glory. I could see 2 bright points of light close to it. Not sure if the 10mm EP can make the moons shine like that. The heat from the almost 100°F day was affecting the clarity and you could see the atmosphere moving like driving on a long flat hot highway.

 

After looking at Saturn and having to move the telescope quite a few times to keep it centered. I started to keep my eye on the EP and just move it rapidly across the sky. Other than the stars flying past quickly, I would stop and focus if one was much brighter than usual. I have no idea what I was looking at. I had bought a star and constellation finder earlier that day. I dialed it in and started to look and didn't realize the spacing between some of the stars on the paper vs the actual sky was so large. Looked back to where Saturn was and the 4 stars I saw earlier were the right claw of Scorpio. Looked way to hard for the big dipper. I was focusing on a part of the sky that was too small. I then pieced together the stars for the handle, and pot. Followed the right side up quite a ways and saw Polaris. (I didn't look for the small dipper because I though it was in a different part of the sky, like I said I was oblivious to the night sky, I later found I was looking at Pleiades I think, thinking it was the little dipper)

 

I wanted to see the full moon but the clouds moved in about Midnight and it was just a glow behind the clouds.

 

Reading the thread made me want a few things changed on my telescope. Bought a 2x Barlow, 4mm Celestron EP, Nikon adapter and the T-adapter. Built the wooden tripod and then looked at the Moon.

 

The first viewing thru a capable telescope was just jaw-dropping.

 

So bright and clear with all the EP's.

 

 ynuAyRMl.jpg

 

Bounced around a few stars the rest of the night and then wasn't able to view for the rest of the week.

 

6 days later the moon changes a lot.

 

ZJDmkaNl.jpg?1

 

owyaJpBl.jpg?3

 

Lower shot is a little blurry because I think the combination between the high heat and collimation is starting to get a bit off. After disliking the amount of play in the focus, I remembered the tip of applying something to the thread. Chap-stick to the rescue. Word of advice - pick a type that smells good. I used a coconut/pineapple scented one. Your nose is right against it so might as well make it smell good.

 

Next step is to make a shroud for the ambient light blocking, learning the skies slowly but surely and maybe looking at the local Houston area clubs.

 

My almost full month of owning the AWB OneSky and making a few mods for comfort and portability the oblivious everyday guy can begin to know what's up there and can point out things just from memory and patterns.

 

I hope to enjoy my time here and you guys/gals are great so far.

 

Cheers.


  • SteveG, howard929, nicknacknock and 8 others like this

#1270 CyberCowboy

CyberCowboy

    Sputnik

  • *****
  • Posts: 46
  • Joined: 16 Mar 2015

Posted 31 July 2015 - 12:28 PM

I remember reading it when I read the whole thread, but I can't find it, for those who have modified the focuser to tighten up some of the play, what did you use to do it?

Also for those wondering, AWB did get back to me and sent out the replacement screws I seem to be missing for my support bars.


  • jlandy likes this

#1271 howard929

howard929

    Member

  • *****
  • Posts: 4248
  • Joined: 02 Jan 2011
  • Loc: Low End of High Ground

Posted 31 July 2015 - 01:45 PM

A couple, three wraps of teflon tape is working for me, I believe others used grease.



#1272 GoldSpider

GoldSpider

    Vostok 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 116
  • Joined: 20 Apr 2015
  • Loc: Pennsylvania

Posted 02 August 2015 - 06:04 AM

A couple, three wraps of teflon tape is working for me, I believe others used grease.

 

That's what I did as well.  That will give you more control over how tight/loose you want the control to be.  Less messy than grease too!



#1273 stargazer193857

stargazer193857

    Mercury-Atlas

  • -----
  • Posts: 2507
  • Joined: 01 Dec 2013
  • Loc: Southern Idaho

Posted 02 August 2015 - 11:49 AM

Others use Chap Stick.



#1274 aFleaByte

aFleaByte

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 2
  • Joined: 29 Jul 2015
  • Loc: N. Houston, TX

Posted 03 August 2015 - 08:05 AM


I remember reading it when I read the whole thread, but I can't find it, for those who have modified the focuser to tighten up some of the play, what did you use to do it?

 

I used Chap-Stick. It helps a lot keeping the slack between the threads and also allows much smoother fine adjustments. Also the smell of the Chap-Stick is good because your face is right next to it when viewing.

 

After using it for a few warmer nights here in Houston, it seems to hold up well and hasn't liquefied yet. even if it does I'm sure it wont drip into the OTA or on the secondary.

 

Also got a decent shot of the Blue Moon over Houston.

 

HdBXnNOm.jpg


Edited by aFleaByte, 03 August 2015 - 08:05 AM.


#1275 CyberCowboy

CyberCowboy

    Sputnik

  • *****
  • Posts: 46
  • Joined: 16 Mar 2015

Posted 03 August 2015 - 08:31 AM

I'm inclined to go with the teflon tape (likely will tonight.)   The chapstick is an innovative solution, but since I'm in Wisconsin I have not only the heat to deal with during the summer (100 degrees with 70-80% humidity) as well as -30 degree winter (yes I do go out viewing then) and I worry the moisture in the chapstick would actually ice up.




CNers have asked about a donation box for Cloudy Nights over the years, so here you go. Donation is not required by any means, so please enjoy your stay.



Recent Reviews


Imaging/Sketching Contest






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics