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#1 JonM

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 07:14 PM

Just checked the Orion site and they are having a red tag sale on returned Sirius mounts at $899, full warranty and free shipping.They may have a scratch or two but have been checked out and repackaged. I ordered one and they gave me another $45 off! I don't think you can go wrong on this deal since it still has the 30 day return with no shipping cost.

#2 BKBrown

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 09:21 PM

WOW! That is a great deal on that mount, congratulations. If I didn't already have one I would be jumping on this offer...

Clear Skies,
Brian

#3 thesubwaypusher

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 05:30 PM

I liked that mount. Very quiet and accurate. Kind of like the new SXD.

#4 labmand

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 07:00 PM

How does the sirius compare to the celestron avx on sale now for
$719? and a 4 year old lxd75? I have a skyview pro rated at 20 lbs
with dsc, love it, thinking of mounting a larger reflector so pulled
out my lxd75 which I had borrowed the tripod off of. Foregot how much
I liked this mount, rated at 30 lbs, same as sirius. It's a few years old
but worked flawlessly. Would it be smart to upgrade the skyview and
lxd75 for a new sirius at this price or the avx at an even better price?
no astrophoto and I like the weight of the sirius mount, Atlas would
be, what? 20lbs more and a few hundred more to spend.

#5 labmand

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 09:42 AM

No feedback? I see a few avx mount posts with issues, maybe not
serious but of concern. I'm not seeing much on the sirius, maybe
worth the extra $? Maybe I'll wait, use the lxd75 for now, just hard
to pass up a good deal. Thanks for any feedback.

#6 rmollise

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 10:04 AM

The plus of the AVX is a more feature-filled hand control with more accurate goto.

The Sirius is not a bad mount, but its payload is similar to the AVX, and IMHO there's not much reason to choose it these days.

The LXD 75? Some folks like 'em...but I've seen one too many torn apart on the observing field. ;)

#7 Stelios

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 10:05 AM

If you're not going to use your mount for AP, there's no real advantage in upgrading an LXD75 to an AVX or Sirius. I assume your LXD75 is functioning properly.

"Bargains" of that type come often. The Sirius is an old mount, and I wouldn't be surprised if a successor was in the wings. People love it for AP because of EQMOD software compatibility and better/smoother tracking. For visual though, if anything it will have a (slightly) lower capacity than an AVX unless you upgrade the legs.

The AVX is basically a refined CG-5 with several AP advantages. I personally prefer the Celestron to the Meade handcontrols, but if you're used to the Meade I see no benefit in switching.

If you *do* think you might get into AP, then the Sirius at this price would make a very good starter mount.

#8 guyroch

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 10:22 AM

The plus of the AVX is a more feature-filled hand control with more accurate goto.

The Sirius is not a bad mount, but its payload is similar to the AVX, and IMHO there's not much reason to choose it these days.


I disagree. If you plan on doing AP the Sirius mount is better than the AVX and as mentioned the AVX has seen -some- issues whereas the Sirius not that much over the years.

Yes the AVX has a better HC but the Sirius has EQMOD.

If your end game is astrophotgraphy, the Sirius is a better mount.

If your end game is observing the difference is not that much.

Guylain

#9 labmand

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 09:41 PM

Thanks for the feedback guys, you got me thinking.

#10 rmollise

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 09:35 AM


I disagree. If you plan on doing AP the Sirius mount is better than the AVX and as mentioned the AVX has seen -some- issues whereas the Sirus not that much over the years.

Yes the AVX has a better HC but the Sirus has EQMOD.

If your end game is astrophotgraphy, the Sirius is a better mount.

If your end game is observing the difference is not that much.

Guylain


Well, I disagree with your disagreement... :lol:

Yes, the Sirius has EQMOD, but the VX has the similar NexRemote.

I have not noted enough (if any) difference between the Sirius HEQ-5 and the AVX in imaging to make much difference. If you want better than either, you really need to go to the Atlas. ;)
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#11 terry59

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 10:32 AM



I disagree. If you plan on doing AP the Sirius mount is better than the AVX and as mentioned the AVX has seen -some- issues whereas the Sirus not that much over the years.

Yes the AVX has a better HC but the Sirus has EQMOD.

If your end game is astrophotgraphy, the Sirius is a better mount.

If your end game is observing the difference is not that much.

Guylain


Well, I disagree with your disagreement... :lol:

Yes, the Sirius has EQMOD, but the VX has the similar NexRemote.

I have not noted enough (if any) difference between the Sirius HEQ-5 and the AVX in imaging to make much difference. If you want better than either, you really need to go to the Atlas. ;)


Rod - Instead of the "mine is better" approach, it may help more if you qualify the type of imaging you do and think these mounts can support.

There is a lot of information on this site relating to issues people have doing longer exposure guided DSO imaging with the AVX. I have not seen anything like that regarding the Sirius due to the DEC axis roller bearing.

You are doing a disservice here IMO

#12 rmollise

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 10:36 AM

Sorry you think I am doing a "disservice." You or anybody else is free to ignore or discount my posts as you see fit. Won't hurt _my_ feelings. :lol:

I do everything from lunar - planetary, to video, to CCD and DSLR prime focus deep sky imaging.

A lot of people go on about the declination axis, but it hasn't prevented me from autoguiding my VX or CG5 for as long as I've wished. ;)
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#13 terry59

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 10:43 AM


A lot of people go on about the declination axis, but it hasn't prevented me from autoguiding my VX or CG5 for as long as I've wished. ;)


Boy you won't answer straight up so....discounted. :foreheadslap:

#14 rmollise

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 03:13 PM

That's fine Terry.

1. I don't know which "straight" answer you wanted. The CG5 declination axis has the same bearings as the VX, you know. Right? The VX, if anything guides better than the CG5. I had no trouble guiding my CG5 with the ST2000 for 10-minute subs. Does that cover all the bases? :cool:
2. If you don't like my posts and/or think I am full of spit, don't read 'em or set me to ignore. That'll larn me. :lol:
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#15 terry59

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 04:00 PM

Thanks Rod that does answer the question. There is plenty of animosity and ignoring here. I would much prefer to engage in respectful dialog.

I am very confused with how you recommend avoiding the Sirius but getting the Atlas.

I also don't understand pushing a mechanically inferior product but each to their own :)

#16 MikeML

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 04:38 PM

Six of one, half dozen the other. I've owned all three. The Heq-5 would most likely be the best mount for imaging if it came with a heavier tripod (and had the Nexstar hand control). That said the HEQ-5 head fits right on the CG5 tripod.
I obtained my AVX this past winter and have not had a problem with stiction and have used the mount down to 15 degrees Fahrenheit. YMMV
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#17 rmollise

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Posted 09 July 2014 - 05:34 PM

Thanks Rod that does answer the question. There is plenty of animosity and ignoring here. I would much prefer to engage in respectful dialog.

I am very confused with how you recommend avoiding the Sirius but getting the Atlas.

I also don't understand pushing a mechanically inferior product but each to their own :)


The Atlas is a far heavier duty mount than either the VX or the Sirius.

The VX is not mechanically inferior.

Other than that we are on the same wavelength. :lol:

#18 JonM

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 01:13 AM

I chose the Sirius for 2 main reasons. The first is that both the axis on the Sirius have roller bearings (two each) while the AVX has metal to metal surfaces on the DEC axis. I have heard these called "sleeve bearings" but the comment I received from Deep Sky Products suggests the AVX only has metal to metal in the DEC axis. They also said the AVX was not as well designed mechanically as the Sirius.

The other reason for the Sirius is EQMOD which does have several features not available with NEXREMOTE. How about drift compensation, sky modeling, auto PEC, customized tracking rate, gamepad support, etc,etc.

#19 guyroch

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 12:10 PM

I chose the Sirius for 2 main reasons. The first is that both the axis on the Sirius have roller bearings (two each) while the AVX has metal to metal surfaces on the DEC axis. I have heard these called "sleeve bearings" but the comment I received from Deep Sky Products suggests the AVX only has metal to metal in the DEC axis. They also said the AVX was not as well designed mechanically as the Sirius.

The other reason for the Sirius is EQMOD which does have several features not available with NEXREMOTE. How about drift compensation, sky modeling, auto PEC, customized tracking rate, gamepad support, etc,etc.


:bow: :bow: :bow:

Congrats on your new mount, you will not be disappointed.

Guylain

#20 JonM

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Posted 10 August 2014 - 08:15 PM

Iv'e had the Serius for about a month now and it works very well. The main thing I like about it is that it guides really well with PHD2. Roundy stars after 10 min subs is nice. It's pretty quiet too and EQMOD works flawlessly.  I also like the fact that the motors are housed in the body of the mount instead of being stuck on outside the mount. It's a cleaner design than the AVX. The power cord can be used with the AC adaper OR with a battery directly connected because it has a cigarette lighter plug incorporated. This is a nice design.  I had no physical backlash on either axis. Easy to balance and light enough for my old knees to carry and mount. It's just a mini Atlas. I really like it.



#21 labmand

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Posted 10 August 2014 - 09:25 PM

Thanks for the update Jon,  I'm close to pulling the trigger but my lxd75

Is a decent mount so..............I'd have to sell it and I just hate selling stuff

but running out of room so..........



#22 terry59

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Posted 11 August 2014 - 06:49 PM

Iv'e had the Serius for about a month now and it works very well. The main thing I like about it is that it guides really well with PHD2. Roundy stars after 10 min subs is nice. It's pretty quiet too and EQMOD works flawlessly.  I also like the fact that the motors are housed in the body of the mount instead of being stuck on outside the mount. It's a cleaner design than the AVX. The power cord can be used with the AC adaper OR with a battery directly connected because it has a cigarette lighter plug incorporated. This is a nice design.  I had no physical backlash on either axis. Easy to balance and light enough for my old knees to carry and mount. It's just a mini Atlas. I really like it.

 

 

Very cool Jon, yours sounds like mine. :)



#23 Patrick

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Posted 13 August 2014 - 12:07 AM

I've owned a Sirius mount as well as many others including a Vixen GP2, CGEM, Atlas, several CG5's and now an AVX.  The Sirius mount has very good fit and finish, is quiet, accurate, and well respected.  The AVX mount is also a very good mount with great performance.  I can do 10 minute subs with it using my C8HD.  The Sirius mount can be driven with EQMOD but I personally don't care for it.  The program seems a bit awkward to use for me.  That's just me though.  Another issue with the Sirius mount for me is that I have very limited visibility overhead in my backyard so guide locator stars can be scarce.  The Sirius firmware has a rather limited selection of guide stars available and there have been instances when I could not complete the alignment routine because I couldn't find guide stars.  I've always been able to find guide stars with the Celestron mounts.

 

When I'm imaging I prefer the ease of use of the AVX hand controller in my workflow. It's has very accurate gotos and the mount itself is well designed for accurate polar alignment.  Along with the Allstar Polar Alignment routine, the mechanical altitude and azimuth controls are smooth and easy to use.  Polar alignment got a lot easier.  I don't need to drive the AVX with a computer other than for guiding which is easily accomplished using PHD guiding through the hand controller.  All the other control features I need are built into the hand controller. 

 

Patrick


Edited by Patrick, 13 August 2014 - 12:11 AM.

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#24 terry59

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Posted 14 August 2014 - 06:23 AM

What a poor way to delete a post :(


Edited by terry59, 14 August 2014 - 06:28 AM.


#25 rmollise

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Posted 14 August 2014 - 04:31 PM

 

The plus of the AVX is a more feature-filled hand control with more accurate goto.

The Sirius is not a bad mount, but its payload is similar to the AVX, and IMHO there's not much reason to choose it these days.


I disagree. If you plan on doing AP the Sirius mount is better than the AVX and as mentioned the AVX has seen -some- issues whereas the Sirius not that much over the years.

Yes the AVX has a better HC but the Sirius has EQMOD.

If your end game is astrophotgraphy, the Sirius is a better mount.

If your end game is observing the difference is not that much.

Guylain

 

 

You're free to disagree, but I have used both and have found the imaging performance of the AVX right up there with the Sirius--if not better. ;)


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