Jump to content


Photo

A Cultural Exchange

  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
171 replies to this topic

#151 astroneil

astroneil

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1812
  • Joined: 28 Jul 2009
  • Loc: res publica caledoniae

Posted 26 August 2014 - 06:32 PM

Date: 27.08.14

Time:00:30h

Temperature: 7.4C

 

A braw nicht! Successful sighting of the comet. Beautifully framed and at its best at 113x in my zoom. Moderately bright coma, merest hints of a tail. Spooky.

 

No thermal problems. Lovely calm images.

 

See you again.

 

Thanks,

 

Neil. ;)


 

#152 Ed Holland

Ed Holland

    Vanguard

  • -----
  • Posts: 2220
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2010
  • Loc: San Jose, CA and Oxford, UK

Posted 26 August 2014 - 06:33 PM

Sorry if I veered a bit off topic. Was trying to think aloud, if you will, on the popularity of telescope designs :)

 

As to the cooling issue, it's never been a problem for me - usually, with a bit of forethought, I can give the telescope a 1/2 hour head start before I begin viewing whilst I do the washing up etc. On the few occasions I've tried to grab and go with the Mak, the heat plume is visible but not too much patience is required. Now that my telescope storage is a cooler location, this will be still less troublesome for the Mak or C8. My 5" refractor will complain if setup and used immediately on a chilly night, so this issue is not black and white by any means.

 

For me, thermal issues are not something that give cause for concern with regard to Cassegrain designs in my possession. I'd buy 'em again :)


 

#153 Ed Holland

Ed Holland

    Vanguard

  • -----
  • Posts: 2220
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2010
  • Loc: San Jose, CA and Oxford, UK

Posted 26 August 2014 - 06:42 PM


Look on the bright side, Ed.


 

 

Oh I do :)

 

The only issue with these Cassegrain designs is the need for careful fitting of the ambifacient lunar waneshaft so that side fumbling is prevented. Easy with a little care. There is a discussion here ;)

 

http://www.cloudynig...t-mirror-shift/


 

#154 astroneil

astroneil

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1812
  • Joined: 28 Jul 2009
  • Loc: res publica caledoniae

Posted 27 August 2014 - 07:28 AM

Hello Steffen,

 

I know how you feel. I feel so privileged owning my own medium aperture Maksutov. Not an Intes but still very, very good. :flowerred:

 

Cheers,

 

Neil. ;)

 


The scope I'm totally infatuated with is my 6" Intes Mak. I've had it since 1998 or so, and it just never ceases to amaze and delight me. This is the scope I use well over 90% of the time.

 

Cheers

Steffen.


 

#155 astroneil

astroneil

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1812
  • Joined: 28 Jul 2009
  • Loc: res publica caledoniae

Posted 27 August 2014 - 07:57 AM

Sorry if I veered a bit off topic. Was trying to think aloud, if you will, on the popularity of telescope designs :)

 

As to the cooling issue, it's never been a problem for me - usually, with a bit of forethought, I can give the telescope a 1/2 hour head start before I begin viewing whilst I do the washing up etc. On the few occasions I've tried to grab and go with the Mak, the heat plume is visible but not too much patience is required. Now that my telescope storage is a cooler location, this will be still less troublesome for the Mak or C8. My 5" refractor will complain if setup and used immediately on a chilly night, so this issue is not black and white by any means.

 

For me, thermal issues are not something that give cause for concern with regard to Cassegrain designs in my possession. I'd buy 'em again :)

Hello Ed,

 

I think it's all about how you prepare. A little forethought goes a long way.

 

I have no idea how 'popular' Maksutovs are, but I've never been one to harbour a 'herd' mentality. We the sheeple. :lol:

 

I get all of my inspiration from those lads and lassies sharing their thoughts through words and sketches in the CN Observers fora ( I predict a stealthy migration:- watch and see :) ). They're the real lights of this hobby, not those who constantly argue and vicariously belittle others because of their 'inferior' equipment.

 

Many folk suffer from apochromat 'addiction'. But I think this spanking big Mak is better than methadone. :lol:

 

Regards,

 

Neil. ;)


Edited by astroneil, 27 August 2014 - 09:51 AM.

 

#156 astroneil

astroneil

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1812
  • Joined: 28 Jul 2009
  • Loc: res publica caledoniae

Posted 27 August 2014 - 08:17 AM

It was good to spy a comet; a first for Cornelia. Right now it's sprinting through Cepheus. The opulent field of view of my trusty ST-80 allowed me to scan the area of sky marking the comet's trajectory, and I was able to quickly zero in on its magnitude 7 glow.

 

I am now resorting to using the slow motion controls of my SkyTee Alt-Az again to keep the motions as smooth as possible in azimuth and altitude. I had forgotten how well they work.

When first the comet entered the field, I could feel my pulse racing. It was a big, eerie glow. For a wee while, I imagined what it might have been like for some of the great 19th century comet hunters; men of the ilk of Lewis & Edward Swift (father and son working together) and the god-gifted Edward Emerson Barnard, who with their classical refractors and narrow fields of view, discovered many new comets between them.

 

Lewis Swift was 79 years young when he found his last.

 

What an inspiration!

 

Thanks,

 

Neil. ;)


Edited by astroneil, 27 August 2014 - 09:36 AM.

 

#157 Ed Holland

Ed Holland

    Vanguard

  • -----
  • Posts: 2220
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2010
  • Loc: San Jose, CA and Oxford, UK

Posted 27 August 2014 - 12:55 PM

I went in search of the comet last night, but I had neglected to check the dates of the CN threads I was using for reference..... Comet "Jaques" is no longer in Casseopia :blush:

 

My other problem is that the neighbors had gone out, leaving their garden and house lights on to welcome their return. This photonic onslaught fairly floods our driveway and makes it very hard to do any meaningful observing. This was a shame because if I shielded my eyes from the dazzling glare, the Milky Way was really showing off. Luckily this issue doesn't arise every night. Aside from picking a few treats amongst the jewels of the Queens crown, I gave up early, and had just finished packing up when the neighbours returned and restored darkness. :tonofbricks:

 

Perhaps tonight I'll  be luckier and better prepared.


 

#158 BillP

BillP

    Voyager 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 11727
  • Joined: 26 Nov 2006
  • Loc: Vienna, VA

Posted 27 August 2014 - 01:09 PM

Successful sighting of the comet [C/2014 E2 (Jacques)]. Beautifully framed and at its best at 113x in my zoom. Moderately bright coma, merest hints of a tail. Spooky.

 

Was this with the SkyWatcher 180mm?  So a 24mm eyepiece?


 

#159 astroneil

astroneil

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1812
  • Joined: 28 Jul 2009
  • Loc: res publica caledoniae

Posted 27 August 2014 - 02:49 PM

I went in search of the comet last night, but I had neglected to check the dates of the CN threads I was using for reference..... Comet "Jaques" is no longer in Casseopia :blush:

 


Perhaps tonight I'll  be luckier and better prepared.

Hi Ed,

 

Best to get it in binos first. It's moving fast. By month's end it will track quite close to Herschel's Garnet Star.

 

Regards,

 

Neil. ;)


 

#160 Ed Holland

Ed Holland

    Vanguard

  • -----
  • Posts: 2220
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2010
  • Loc: San Jose, CA and Oxford, UK

Posted 27 August 2014 - 03:25 PM

Thanks Neil - I did start with binos at first, but even they are no use if one is looking in the wrong direction :bangbang:  Also compounding my troubles was that this is about the most light-polluted region of the sky from our site.

 

On the plus side, my brief hunt for more information this morning led me to discover the "Real Time Planetarium" at www.theskylive.com and also the www.livecometdata.com site. Not bad as compensation.

 

Now, which telescope tonight?


 

#161 astroneil

astroneil

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1812
  • Joined: 28 Jul 2009
  • Loc: res publica caledoniae

Posted 27 August 2014 - 04:03 PM

Howdy Ed,

 

Cool website.

 

No telescope bliss for me tonight unfortunately. Rain on the way. :(

 

Happy hunting!

 

Regards,

 

Neil. ;)


 

#162 Pete-LH

Pete-LH

    Messenger

  • *****
  • Posts: 414
  • Joined: 25 Mar 2009
  • Loc: Wilmington, DE

Posted 27 August 2014 - 04:31 PM

I was able to catch Jacques last night ... Alas don't have a Mak but used my large SCT C9.25. Tried working my way over from Caph to iota Cephei first (about 10 deg?) and after some frustration grabbed the binoculars, made the same path and there it was. After picking out a couple asterisms to follow I did manage to get it in the finder and then the main OTA (67X, 0.94 deg). Switched between that and 138X/0.59 deg but the lower magnification was best. After watching for a while and making sure I could detect motion (Great Sensation) I went and got my 70mm f/8 refractor (18X/2.76 deg) for a wider view. ONe of the best two hours observing ever (2-4am). Getting to work this morning was tough.

Having the binoculars (12x50 5 deg field) is always a great combination. I love to find targets that way.

I'm going to try again to night and compare some small refractors for the view (if the weather holds out).


 

#163 astroneil

astroneil

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1812
  • Joined: 28 Jul 2009
  • Loc: res publica caledoniae

Posted 28 August 2014 - 07:24 AM

Hi Pete,

 

Great report. Glad you got a chance to see it.

 

Regards,

 

Neil. ;)


 

#164 Ed Holland

Ed Holland

    Vanguard

  • -----
  • Posts: 2220
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2010
  • Loc: San Jose, CA and Oxford, UK

Posted 28 August 2014 - 10:25 AM

Better prepared, I ventured out again last night for a short observing session, to be greeted by very good skies, nice dark surroundings and with a strong determination to make up for the previous night's observing bust... With my ancient 7x50 binocular I scoured the area indicated by my updated chart and located Comet Jaques after a little searching, lurking in the vicinity of Iota Cephei. Following up with the 5" refractor, I enjoyed the view for a little while, where the comet sat amongst an attractive backdrop of feint stars. At one point, a satellite whizzed right through the view and across the object.

 

From there, I realised I had never paid any attention to Cephus before, and thought I should pay m respects to the Monarch. The sky being rather bright to the North, I settled on a tour of the double stars, and particularly enjoyed delta and beta Cephei. With little time or energy left, I returned to Jaques, noting (I think) a little change in position relative to a pair of stars almost caught up in its halo. For a second coincidence, I watched as a meteor streaked straight down through the field and right through the comet - Thunderbolts from the King!

 

Think I'll chase Jaques some more, perhaps with the Mak. Hopefully, things will stay fair for the Town Star Party this Friday - I hope to do my little bit of outreach.

 

All in all, a rather good night.

Ed


 

#165 astroneil

astroneil

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1812
  • Joined: 28 Jul 2009
  • Loc: res publica caledoniae

Posted 28 August 2014 - 01:01 PM

Sounds like an exciting night Ed.

 

Heehaw to see here unfortunately. Hoping for something better this weekend.

 

I've enjoyed quite a few fireballs streaking across the sky from east to west in the aftermath of the Perseids. Nothing like a truly dark sky to enjoy them in.

 

Beta Cephei is a corker in a small telescope and Xi Ceph is worth having a look at too if you get a chance.

 

What 5 inch achromat do you have? I rate achromats higher than any other refractor. They're the most precious of all - and history will prove me right I hope.

 

Regards,

 

Neil. ;)


Edited by astroneil, 28 August 2014 - 01:04 PM.

 

#166 Ed Holland

Ed Holland

    Vanguard

  • -----
  • Posts: 2220
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2010
  • Loc: San Jose, CA and Oxford, UK

Posted 28 August 2014 - 03:17 PM

Neil - I've long enjoyed your enthusiasm for the humble doublet ;)

 

My scope is a pre owned, modified Meade AR5. Courtesy of some considerable generosity, and a little adaptive handiwork, it now sports a 2 speed Crayford focuser. I have also spent time studying the objective to tackle mild spherical undercorrection. Firstly I experimented with lens spacing and more recently, by adding corn oil to the gap between elements. It gets better and better with each revision. I'm an itinerant tinkerer, and this hobby presents plenty of, er, scope....

 

But tonight, I'll attempt to observe with a more "on topic" instrument. I'm tempted by the 7" Mak, but have a C8 already that is a fine planetary instrument (also much tinkered, but not filled with oil yet) and on the budget front, am contemplating some bits for the MGB (Tinkered with and oil filled ;))


 

#167 TG

TG

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 1287
  • Joined: 02 Nov 2006
  • Loc: Latitude 47

Posted 28 August 2014 - 03:54 PM

I was chased off the lawn by a mistimed sprinkler (the fastest I have ever unmounted my 7" refractor!) and the clouds rolled in soon after, but for those still trying to find the comet:

 

http://www.livecomet...014-e2-jacques/

 

Very useful if you have the ability to navigate using RA/DEC.

 

Doesn't look like I'll have the opportunity for a couple more days :(

 

Tanveer.


 

#168 astroneil

astroneil

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1812
  • Joined: 28 Jul 2009
  • Loc: res publica caledoniae

Posted 28 August 2014 - 05:54 PM

Date: 28.08.14
Time: 23:00h
Ambient: 13.2C, 1003mB, rising. Mild, breezy, 70 per cent overcast.

I enjoyed a very brief vigil tonight with Cornelia. I took her straight out of my shed and onto the SkyTee. The cloud made hunting down the comet too problematical but I was able to visit one interesting target.

 

I first located the lovely and easy binary system 16 Cygni. Both glowed in a creamy white colour at 113x in a very rich Milky Way hinterland. Panning about two ‘low power’ fields east of this spot, Cornelia picked up the 8th magnitude planetary nebula, NGC 6826; one of my favourites! Famously known as the Blinking Planetary Nebula, it presented as a beautiful, tidy, blue-green ball. Increasing the magnification to 225x, the very generous light grasp of the big Maksutov easily revealed the 10th magnitude central star, as well as two clearly made out shells of ejected matter. The outermost shell presented more faintly and was circular, the innermost brighter and more oblong. I never seem to notice the reported ‘winking’ in this planetary.Don't know why.

This is an excellent telescope to study the morphological features of planetary nebulae!

Completely clouded out by 23:30h

 

Time to turn in again.

 

Cheerio the noo,

 

Thanks,

 

Neil. ;)


 

#169 astroneil

astroneil

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1812
  • Joined: 28 Jul 2009
  • Loc: res publica caledoniae

Posted 01 September 2014 - 04:59 AM

Hello Ed,

 

The Meade AR5 achromat is one fine five inch refractor. Extremely satisfying to use and of manageable length.

 

Hope it gives you many years of continued happiness.

 

Regards,

 

Neil. ;)


 

#170 astroneil

astroneil

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1812
  • Joined: 28 Jul 2009
  • Loc: res publica caledoniae

Posted 01 September 2014 - 05:01 AM

Date 30.08.14
Time 21:30h
Ambient: 13C, mild, 8mph westerly wind, ~40 per cent cloud cover, seeing good as deduced by fine double star images down to ~1.5”
Instrument: 180mm f/15 Maksutov Cassegrain

 

I enjoyed a feast of colour contrast doubles with the Maksutov earlier in the evening, the cooling breeze faithfully keeping the dew at bay. As a double star enthusiast, I am continually thrilled with its high resolution, high-magnification performance.

 

I then turned Cornelia on Mu Cephei, Herschel’s Garnet Star, at around 23:00h, when it was satisfyingly close to the zenith.  Right on track, Comet Jacques was observed just west and (very excitedly!) in the same field of view at 113x as the famous ruby sun! How about that!

 

Thank goodness for small mercies!

 

Although the comet had noticeably dimmed since last sighted, it felt special witnessing this brief communion of celestial objects. It looked like the comet was closing in on the star as the minutes ran by, cloud sometimes cutting off the view, and I reckon they were at (or near) their closest around 23:30h.

 

It completely clouded out soon after that.

 

Temperature at 00:15h, 11C.

 

 

Thanks,

 

Neil. ;)


Edited by astroneil, 01 September 2014 - 05:52 AM.

 

#171 astroneil

astroneil

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1812
  • Joined: 28 Jul 2009
  • Loc: res publica caledoniae

Posted 01 September 2014 - 05:31 AM

The only thing that remains to test Cornelia on is the Moon and the bright planets.

 

I will return to this thread at a later stage, once they are more favourably placed for observation.

 

For now, I have more work to do with Gaius, my little 80mm f/5 achromatic; an instrument that helps establish my grounding.

 

 

Here is a link to some recent commentaries on the 80mm f/5:

 

 

http://www.cloudynig...shorttube-80-a/

 

Thanks,

 

Neil. ;)


 

#172 cbwerner

cbwerner

    Surveyor 1

  • -----
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 1502
  • Joined: 27 Aug 2005
  • Loc: Maidens, VA

Posted 01 September 2014 - 12:41 PM

This thread has been trending off topic for this forum for some time, but is now at the point where it is firmly off topic.  Therefore, it is being locked.

 

I would suggest that whomever wants to continue it select a different, on topic forum on CN and restart the thread there. Just make sure to stay on task for whatever forum you select. Thanks.


 






Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics