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Cataract surgery article in 9/2014 S&T

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#1 edwincjones

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Posted 31 July 2014 - 07:41 PM

As someone who is not looking forward to the procedure in the future,
I found the article interesting.

Any feedback from those who have been there?

edj

#2 mich_al

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 10:49 AM

I'd be tempted to send the article to my eye surgeon. Seems that being an astronomer complicates the issue a bit.

#3 Peter B

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Posted 01 August 2014 - 07:39 PM

One of my retina reattachment procedures created a cataract that I had surgery for in May of this year. I wound up with some kind of diffraction artifact(?) that creates a spike of light passing through most light sources from the 2 o'clock position to the 8 o'clock position. I don't notice it much on stars with the naked eye but, the image of Mars and Saturn in 60 mm Tasco were streaked-out in the same directions. I also have a fold or crease in my retina. So the right eye is pretty much worthless for solar, lunar and planetary work. The image of the Sun in my PST is pretty weird looking! I am learning to use my left eye for slp work and hope my right eye will be okay for DSO's. For everyday living, I think that things are going to be alright however, it's taken a long time for my depth perception to come back. It makes playing tennis interesting! Overall, I'm pleased with my surgeries since I can still see with my right eye.

#4 havasman

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Posted 02 August 2014 - 04:11 PM

I thought the article was a great resource precisely because it will be the basis of a long, detailed discussion between any surgeon who'll ever work on my eyes and me. At 63YO, that potentiality is real.
Peter B, respect to you for taking the long, wide view of your surgeries' outcomes.
Good seeing to us all, in the most inclusive sense.
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#5 Jeff B1

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Posted 04 August 2014 - 05:10 PM

My wife and I had cataract surgery in early 2012 and we both think it was the best procedure we have ever experienced.  As a planetary astronomer I have benefited greatly by the surgery that not only corrected some color problems and wild diffraction like spikes caused by cataracts the surgeon put in corrective lenses and reduced my astigmatism by 80%.  Before the surgery images of planets had halos and starburst spikes that nearly stopped me from observing.  Even auto headlights those starbursts that caused difficulty in driving at night. 

 

While the floaters were not removed the surgery proved to be very good for observing. I have not read the article; gave up S&T years ago, I will have to get the issue and read it.  Thanks... 



#6 mdowns

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 04:01 PM

EDJ,

 I had my left eye done about 8 months ago. My first evening after surgery I knew something was amiss. All lights(street,cars,etc) look like immense diffraction spikes when you view Sirius through a large newt. I could'nt view anything through the scope as every star across the fov looked that way..My daytime vision was remarkably improved though (from 20/30 to 20/20). My doctor did a similar laser correction but it did'nt make any difference. He suggested to me that it might in time go away.Interestingly,sometimes the night time vision is completely normal. When that's the case I can see much fainter stars using the left eye compared to my dominant,right eye.More often than not it's still an issue.Time will tell. My right needs the same surgery but I've now convinced myself to hold off to the last possible moment.



#7 Jeff B1

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 05:37 PM

I must have been fortunate or lucky to have no problem like yawl described here.  We had custom lenses included in the surgery that corrected our near sightedness (can drive now without glasses, a blessing for sure).  My telescope observing has returned to what it was years ago.  Sorry to hear people have problems with that surgery and someday your eyes get back to normal.



#8 Man in a Tub

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 07:34 PM

Edwin,

 

There have been many threads about cataract surgery and intraocular implants. The members who have replied about horrible difficulties are likely a minority.

 

Before my operations in 2006, the ophthalmologist's only "warning" was that the severity of the left-eye cataract blocked evaluation of the retina. Well, there was no problem.

 

Cataracts in most cases give the world a yellow cast. Lens implants get rid of it! I immediately saw vivid colors with the first implant in my left eye. What a difference between my left and right eye! To this day, I am less nearsighted and don't wear glasses more than 90+% of the time. Due to some astigmatism, I started using my glasses for binocular observing almost four years ago.

 

Since I know you use binoculars, I recommend that you do not choose "near/far" implants.

 

I'll read the S&T article when it's available online from my local library.

 

Best regards, 


Edited by Man in a Tub, 05 August 2014 - 07:41 PM.


#9 edwincjones

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 06:38 PM

thank you for the replies

 

the standard is that the potential benefit out weights the potential risk

no procedure is 100% safe

 

so, when my vision gets to the point  I cannot tolerate, 

I will get the surgery and hope the odds favor me

 

edj



#10 mayidunk

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Posted 07 August 2014 - 06:14 PM

I had a "phaco" done on my right eye back in 1996.  I was initially bothered by diffraction spikes caused by "stuff" that had precipitated on the surface of the posterior face of the lens capsule.  Several weeks after the surgery, the surgeon used a Nd-YAG laser to clean that "stuff" off of the the lens capsule, creating what amounts to a clear window that's just large enough to accommodate the light cone from an EP. 

 

Prior to doing the laser thing, I discussed my astronomy hobby with the doctor, explaining how beneficial it would be if he could make that opening as large as possible.  He not only agreed to it, but was willing to allow me to evaluate the result, and return for another treatment if the opening proved to be too small!   In the end, I have been able to fit most every exit pupil in that eye, though in many cases I have needed to keep my eye located within a very small area in order to prevent the light cone from grazing the edges of that opening.

 

I am due to have my left eye done, so I'll have to read that article before I do so.



#11 Jeff B1

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Posted 09 August 2014 - 10:34 AM

My eye doc and surgeon were aware that I was a telescopic observer and maybe that is why I had no problems afterward.  The only thing that bothers me at times is when a film develops on my eyes that cause some spikes, but a good wash and drops usually cures that.  My floaters bother me at times but there is a workaround for that – depends on how my head is situated if they get into my observing way.  My eye doc and I discuss astronomy and observing whenever and he knows we observers recognize eye problems right away.  Before any surgery one should discuss it with the surgeon in detail to lessen the problems that some here have mentioned.



#12 Starman1

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Posted 10 September 2014 - 01:56 PM

Though it is not recommended if not truly necessary, a vitrectomy can rid the eye of floaters and create much clearer vision.

This is not recommended for those who have not already had cataract surgery/lens implants because it leads to cataracts in those with

original lenses.

My wife has had a vitreous detachment in both eyes and her vision has "gauze curtains" (her words) that drift across her vision.

She will be a candidate for a vitrectomy, but not until well after cataract surgery.

As for myself, my non (fortunately) observing eye has a large black floater right in the center of its vision.  My observing eye is relatively clear.

Both eyes have tons of minor floaters.

 

This growing old is for the birds.

But i suppose it's better than the alternative.



#13 RodgerHouTex

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Posted 10 September 2014 - 02:22 PM

 

Though it is not recommended if not truly necessary, a vitrectomy can rid the eye of floaters and create much clearer vision.

This is not recommended for those who have not already had cataract surgery/lens implants because it leads to cataracts in those with

original lenses.

My wife has had a vitreous detachment in both eyes and her vision has "gauze curtains" (her words) that drift across her vision.

She will be a candidate for a vitrectomy, but not until well after cataract surgery.

As for myself, my non (fortunately) observing eye has a large black floater right in the center of its vision.  My observing eye is relatively clear.

Both eyes have tons of minor floaters.

 

This growing old is for the birds.

But i suppose it's better than the alternative.

 

And I might add, everyone gets old if they live long enough.   :lol:



#14 Jeff B1

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Posted 10 September 2014 - 05:28 PM

Don, my eye doc warns me against such surgery so maybe he knows best.  After developing more and darker ones some years back I was going to have them removed, but listened to my doctor.  The first problem I had was vitreous pucker, or something like that, and both eyes showed a spider web effect like a ghost image.  Then as age crept up the flashes got worse then macular pucker developed in both eyes. 

 

Of course, that went along with the macular degeneration, the age thing again, so it just bothers me if I actually want it to.  Sounds similar to what your wife sees.  Like Tinnitus, that too doesn't bother me until I want it to.

 

Speaking of that age thing, I just wished Tippy D -- happy birthday, he is 79!  I am a few years younger! 








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