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Ieq45 pro

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135 replies to this topic

#126 lmichel

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Posted 16 June 2016 - 12:32 PM

Hmmm... I suppose it could be flexure.  It just doesn't seem like it.  But I certainly should rule it out.  

I have an STXL-11002 with the FWG (integrated guider in front of the filters.)  I've never had success with OAG.  Hate those **** pick-off mirrors that I can never get even a starfield on.  My STT-8300M has the remote guidehead port that I could use with a OAG accessory.  

I guess it's time I hang with you "big dogs" and learn to OAG :)

 

Maybe I should enroll in a class at Dark Arts Observatory - lol.  Wonder if they offer anything like that ;-)

 

Thanks!

 

- Lance



#127 Midnight Dan

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Posted 25 June 2016 - 12:05 PM

Were you setting the time manually? The GPS should set the location and time for you.  Did you wait till the GPS indicator on the handset changed from "ON" to "OK"?

 

Also, I don't believe that the alignment procedure uses the data to calculate alignment until you're all done with it.  Because of that, the 2nd and 3rd star can be off just as much as the first.

 

-Dan



#128 fmeschia

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Posted 25 June 2016 - 12:06 PM

HELP! this is probably a dumb question but I need confirmation or otherwise of my solution...

I had my ieq45 pro out last night and spent 3 hours trying to accurately align it. couldn't find guide stars, even the third one in the three star protocol (which should be pretty much dead on by then..)

 

Looking around online and reading the manual again, I decided maybe it was because my time zone was set incorrectly - I'm central, and I discovered that when the mount is switched off, it doesnt remember that information (defaults to -300) - is this standard for all ieqs?? if so why would ioptron design the handset to remember time and date between sessions but not time zone? and this is probably why the gotos were so bad I'm guessing? I know I have to set daylight savings, but it remembers that setting!

 

Also - the ieq has gps obviously, why can't it decide which time zone automatically?

 

One last question: with all settings now apparently correct, the clock on the settings page is 1h ahead of the time on my computer.. why? if i try to change to to "correct time", it changes back automatically... is it formally not taking daylight savings into account?

 

on the plus side first time guiding last night i think it performed pretty well. but boy was  i using some harsh language on it.

 

 

edit: after playing with settings for a while, and a few power cycles, now it remembers and displays correct settings and time as well! I think this thing is gaslighting me.

 

My mount remembers the time zone and daylight savings settings, but does not determine that automatically.

I understand the HBX has a backup battery, maybe yours has died?



#129 Artc

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Posted 16 July 2016 - 10:53 PM

Is V5 Astroworks still around? I can't find it. Thanks for any help.



#130 bobzeq25

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Posted 17 July 2016 - 11:43 PM

Is V5 Astroworks still around? I can't find it. Thanks for any help.

Nope.  Paul retired.



#131 mac1969

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Posted 22 July 2016 - 06:50 PM

Setting up the IEQ45 pro: I pieced together a list from my experiences and various sources on cloudy nights and elsewhere. apologies if you recognize something you wrote and any comments or corrections welcome.

 

1) Level tripod (I use an accurate level on the base and ignore the built-in bubble level). Assemble mount, scope and CW's, and do a rough balance.

 

2) a. Level the polar scope using the bubble level. This may be sufficient but see (b)
b. You can more precisely level the polar scope by placing polaris on the horizontal axis of the scope reticle, loosening the az bolts, and moving the mount right and left in az, checking to see if polaris stays on the reticle on the left and right sides. If it is higher one side, use the hand control to adjust. Then loosely screw down azi bolts again.

 

3) Polar align using the polar scope and the information from the HC as normal. You can drift align at this point if needed. Once this is done the RA axis is aligned to the pole and you can move on to refining the pointing model.

 

4) Release clutches and put the scope into rough zero position by eye (dec and ra surfaces at vertical) (note - unlike some other mounts, this does not affect polar scope rotation or level). Note that it's possible to set dec to vertical using a level held against the side of the flat dovetail plate, but it's not possible to set ra to vertical this way, since there is no flat surface to use). Use the handset to record this zero position.

 

5) Without changing anything, refine zero position by sending the mount to park. If you haven't changed the settings, the default park is at 90° to vertical for each axis. You can then use an accurate level on the now horizontal dec and ra surfaces (the counterweight bar and dovetail plate), releasing the clutches to level in each case. Lock clutches again and then send back to zero position with the HC.

 

6) Do a one star alignment (pick a star near the zenith), but instead of centering using the hand controller, loosen ra and dec clutches and center star by hand, lock again, and send the mount back to zero position with the HC. This should give you the most accurate zero position, which you can now mark on the mount if you want to.

 

7) Three-star align to refine pointing. If the one star align was good, and cone error is low, stars should be in the field.

 

Notes:
At step 6, you don't need to use one star alignment in the menu. You can clear the calibration data and just slew to a star, unlock the clutches and manually center the star and then tighten the clutches.  You are now one star aligned and the zero position is the true Alt, Az in relation to the earth, or relatively close. The good or bad thing about using one star alignment to move to a star is it automatically clears the calibration data as soon as you select align. One star alignment data is also cleared immediately if you chose two or three star alignment.

 

Sync to a star does not clear the alignment data when it moves to the star you wish to sync to.

 

If you mark the zero position, it is only valid if you can get your mount and tripod back into the exact same position in relation to the earth.

Level really doesn't matter unless you drift align.

 

To verify if your level is correct (assuming you have minimal cone error), goto any target at the Zenith slightly to east of the Meridian, then try to slew to a target West of the Meridian near the Zenith. If your level is good, both targets will be spot on, and Goto's should work. If your level is off, your Goto's will only work on one side. Fix your level and start again.

 

Depending on the weight of your gear, it may be easier to polar align before assembling the scope. I do it this way because adding the full weight may shift position of the mount.


Edited by mac1969, Yesterday, 11:53 AM.

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#132 purdyd

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Posted Yesterday, 07:31 AM

Everything was fine until you went to step 6 where you say use the alt/az adjustment screws.  Don't you mean loosen the clutches and adjust RA and DEC?  As you just messed up the polar alignment if you moved the ALT/AZ screws.

 

I think the automatic clearing of data when you select align should not happen, or at least you should be given an option to set the behavior as a setting.

 

You should add a note, if you mark the zero position, it is only valid if you can get your mount and tripod back into the exact same position in relation to the earth.

 

Level really doesn't matter unless you drift align.



#133 Midnight Dan

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Posted Yesterday, 09:01 AM

As purdyd points out, #6 is incorrect.  If you adjust the alt/az settings, you throw off your polar alignment.  Instead, you should loosen the clutches and center the star by manually rotating the RA and Dec axes.

 

-Dan



#134 mac1969

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Posted Yesterday, 11:48 AM

Yeah, I missed that mistake, thanks!

 

I've added your notes, thanks for the help..



#135 mac1969

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Posted Yesterday, 11:56 AM

Everything was fine until you went to step 6 where you say use the alt/az adjustment screws.  Don't you mean loosen the clutches and adjust RA and DEC?  As you just messed up the polar alignment if you moved the ALT/AZ screws.

 

I think the automatic clearing of data when you select align should not happen, or at least you should be given an option to set the behavior as a setting.

 

You should add a note, if you mark the zero position, it is only valid if you can get your mount and tripod back into the exact same position in relation to the earth.

 

Level really doesn't matter unless you drift align.

 

Purdyd, can you please explain in more detail why level doesnt matter unless drift aligning?



#136 purdyd

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Posted Yesterday, 06:12 PM

What is important for an Equatorial amount is that the ra axis is aligned with the celestial pole.  The mount base does not have to be level for this to happen.

 

drift alignment on the other hand assumes that the mount is level so for example when you point south in the equator and observe drift, you adjust the azimuth because the assumption is that elevation does not affect it in that orientation and that is true only if the base is level


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