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Baader Double Stacked Solar Continuum Filter

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#1 NorthWolf

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Posted 05 August 2014 - 11:27 PM

Anyone compared this to a single stack solar continuum filter? Looks interesting.

 

http://agenaastro.co...uum-filter.html



#2 Eric38

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 12:10 AM

It looks to be the same principal as used in a double stacked PST H-a telescope. Two like filters with one at a slight angle from the other. I have a PST with a double stack and by adjusting the angle in the filter cell you fine tune a "sweet spot" for contrast. I know that the effect that this has in Hydrogen Alpha is quite substantial but the price that they are asking for what is essentially just two green filters is way to much. I have a single "Solar Continuum" filter and it does increase contrast and detail in sunspots though. I would be curious to read a review if someone were to splurge on the double stack.  :scratchhead:



#3 BYoesle

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 07:07 PM

Since this is a relatively broadband filter for the photosphere's continuum spectrum, there is no point to it whatsoever.  It will not improve contrast, it will make the image less bright.



#4 Max Power

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 09:22 PM

The product description is completely bogus.  It's just darker than the single stacker.

BUT, when used with the Lunt wedge with no polarizer, it dims the view to comfortable levels.

So not totally a waste of money.



#5 NorthWolf

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Posted 06 August 2014 - 10:55 PM

Do you think it's 2 single solar continuum filters threaded together or is this one made differently? Would it be helpful for camera usage?



#6 bsavoie

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Posted 07 August 2014 - 10:35 AM

Baaders Double filter. That is something I have also considered. I seem to be swimming in all of this technology lately. I have just had a Lunt LS60T Ha B1200 for 4 days. Two weeks ago I did not know I would be able to get a good deal on a solar scope. Therefore I purchased a 2 inch Baader Solar Continuum Filter and a Baader AstroSolarâ„¢ film Filter cell for my NS11GPS Schmidt-Cassegrain. All of these arrived at my house on the same day, last Saturday. Needless to say, I have been using both systems, and realizing that they show different perspectives. Yes it is the same Sun, but very interesting differences.

 

The nice thing about a filter, is that you can take it out. Thus the telescope becomes useful at night too. Still the sharp bandwidth of the Lunt, is unmatchable as far as I can tell. In so many ways the Lunt is all about getting a sharp bandpass. Then again, in theory the double filter may have something to offer us. Everything in Solar astronomy is so expensive. Without reports by others, and arguments between committed owners, It is very hard to tell. So many options for a new person to consider. Where is the sweet spot in all this complexity? Where is the profile of cost vs benefit? What are the easy or inexpensive steps to take in learning about the Sun?

 

Enter this filter option from Baader, a respected filter vendor. It should be possible to get a spectrum analysis of how this double filter works. It isn't just double stacked, it is exactly parallel, so there may be a diffraction possibility here? It might be complex. It is also a large commercial market. Solar astronomy is almost unknown in the general population. I would think you could write Baader a nice letter, and suggest that they lend you one, and you will write up a report and publish (after they review it) on cloudy nights. It would actually help them sell their product. If you have the time and the interest, it might be a great way to satisfy your curiosity. It would also help us find those lest expensive steps forward, on this long path to solar brilliance. Yes, go for it!



#7 BYoesle

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Posted 07 August 2014 - 02:54 PM

Or you could simply search Baader Continuum for past topics dealing with this filter:

 

http://www.cloudynig...um#entry5588982

 

 

BUT, when used with the Lunt wedge with no polarizer, it dims the view to comfortable levels.

So not totally a waste of money.

Likely a cheaper alternative would be to use a good ND filter to do this, or combine a single continuum with a polarizer.


Edited by BYoesle, 07 August 2014 - 03:07 PM.


#8 NorthWolf

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Posted 07 August 2014 - 03:45 PM

Roger, thought it was new... I think ill get a single continuum and an ir/uv cut for visual and photo

#9 Eric38

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Posted 08 August 2014 - 04:02 PM

 It isn't just double stacked, it is exactly parallel, so there may be a diffraction possibility here?

​From the vendor: 

"It consists of two 1.25" standard Baader Solar Continuum filters that are slightly tilted against each other and held in a special cell."

 

Also:

"Please Note: Because of the inclusion of the Baader astrosolar film with this filter, we do not accept any returns/exchanges for this item once it has been opened. All sales are final."

 

Bummer, not worth the cost to risk ratio. Why the film?








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