Jump to content


Photo

Veil Nebula in binoculars?

  • Please log in to reply
31 replies to this topic

#1 stargazer193857

stargazer193857

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1264
  • Joined: 01 Dec 2013
  • Loc: Southern Idaho

Posted 06 August 2014 - 11:01 AM

It is 3 degrees across, and I've seen parts of it at a dark sky site in a 20" dob. At the same site and same night, I did scan around the Cygnus  Milky Way with 7x35 binoculars, not looking for it, and possibly not looking for Veil. I did not stumble on the Veil. I now wonder what binoculars can see it. Do I need 12x70, 7x50, 10x50? Is a filter required?



#2 Astrojensen

Astrojensen

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5263
  • Joined: 05 Oct 2008
  • Loc: Bornholm, Denmark

Posted 06 August 2014 - 11:29 AM

I regularly see the eastern half under good skies with my 8x40 binoculars. No filter used.

 

 

Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark



#3 desertlens

desertlens

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 844
  • Joined: 06 Dec 2010
  • Loc: 36°N 105°W

Posted 06 August 2014 - 11:55 AM

I've seen the Veil with 10x50 binoculars but it's quite faint, even at a dark site. I've had much better luck with a 60mm finder I'm using as a monocular. With a 25mm Abbe and an OIII, the views were impressive.



#4 skysurfer

skysurfer

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 296
  • Joined: 05 Oct 2009
  • Loc: NL, N 52 E 6

Posted 06 August 2014 - 01:41 PM

Put UHC or OIII filters behind the eyepieces and that will boost considerably.

With an 80mm refractor @21x power (Panoptic 24) and UHC on a dark site, it is amazing !



#5 Smithfr2000

Smithfr2000

    Explorer 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 99
  • Joined: 12 Sep 2009
  • Loc: Nantes - France

Posted 06 August 2014 - 02:50 PM

I have seen the eastern part with 7X35 (Nikon AE) with a good sky (SQM 21.6) in mountain from south France (1300 meters height), without filter.


Edited by Smithfr2000, 06 August 2014 - 02:51 PM.


#6 John_G

John_G

    Messenger

  • -----
  • Posts: 473
  • Joined: 18 Jan 2010

Posted 06 August 2014 - 04:10 PM

Last year I saw the eastern from a Bortle 2 site with 10x50s on a night with exceptionally good transparancy. I tried again last weekend from a different Bortle 2 location but coudn't see it with either 10x50 or 15x70.



#7 JonNPR

JonNPR

    Mariner 2

  • *****
  • Posts: 299
  • Joined: 04 Mar 2013
  • Loc: Oregon

Posted 06 August 2014 - 04:16 PM

I saw it at zenith last new moon cycle, with 15x70 Celestrons. Mounted on a Chuck Lott Bowling Ball-ShowerHead-mount in a crutches tripod (!).

 

Jon



#8 Mark9473

Mark9473

    Cosmos

  • *****
  • Posts: 8676
  • Joined: 21 Jul 2005
  • Loc: 51°N 4°E

Posted 06 August 2014 - 05:02 PM

In my suburban skies (mag 5 - 5.5) I can see the Veil in my 15x60, but it's a faint target in a very busy starfield so it definitely does not jump out when casually scanning the region.



#9 davidmcgo

davidmcgo

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1418
  • Joined: 09 Oct 2004
  • Loc: San Diego, CA

Posted 06 August 2014 - 05:05 PM

The Eastern section, NGC6992 is usually pretty easy for me in reasonable skies here out West, and I have seen it with 8x23 Nikons from the Grand Canyon.

 

10x70s or 15x70s are obviously a better view but once you see it at the image scale of binoculars it is much easier to go smaller and still see it.

 

Dave



#10 penguinx64

penguinx64

    Apollo

  • -----
  • Posts: 1371
  • Joined: 12 Nov 2013
  • Loc: Holland

Posted 06 August 2014 - 06:16 PM

I tried 7x35, 7x50 binoculars and my 4.5 inch reflector scope.  I can't see the Veil with any of them, with our without filters.



#11 bumm

bumm

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 583
  • Joined: 07 Jan 2011
  • Loc: Iowa

Posted 06 August 2014 - 06:54 PM

The eastern side is definitely easier, despite the western side being well marked by 52 Cygni.  Perhaps the brightness of the star drowns out the fainter nebula.  The curve of the eastern side seems a little small to fit the size of the entire loop, but it's definitely the easiest part once you pick it out.  It's pretty conspicuous in my 11x80's through moderate light pollution if I wear red goggles to get well dark adapted...  The inside of the loop looks lighter, too, probably from being cleared by the "explosion."  I recently looked for it with 20x80's with poor dark adaptation, but I had trouble until I realized it was about the same size as my FOV.  Still, dim for me unless I get very well dark adapted.

Marty


Edited by bumm, 06 August 2014 - 06:55 PM.

  • oktwodogs likes this

#12 Jon Isaacs

Jon Isaacs

    ISS

  • *****
  • Posts: 44012
  • Joined: 16 Jun 2004
  • Loc: San Diego and Boulevard, CA

Posted 07 August 2014 - 06:42 AM

I tried 7x35, 7x50 binoculars and my 4.5 inch reflector scope.  I can't see the Veil with any of them, with our without filters.

 

How dark are you skies?  Is the Milky Way easily seen?  If so, the Veil should be visible in your telescope with a filter.  I see it in my 10x50s unfiltered from the nearby mountains.  On a good night, I can see it in a telescope from my urban (mag 4.5 overhead) with a filter, I see a fair amount of detail in my 13.1inch F/5.5 and I have seen it in my 4 inch apo... It's not much to see in the 4 inch from my backyard. 

 

Jon



#13 Jarrod

Jarrod

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1118
  • Joined: 20 Jan 2013
  • Loc: SE USA

Posted 07 August 2014 - 01:34 PM

I see it very well at 25x in a 100mm BT with NPB filters in mag 4-4.5 skies.  Breathtaking.



#14 kkokkolis

kkokkolis

    Vanguard

  • *****
  • Moderators
  • Posts: 2148
  • Joined: 23 Sep 2009
  • Loc: Piraeus, Greece

Posted 07 August 2014 - 02:34 PM

The smallest optic I saw it was the WO 66ED with a Vixen LVW 22mm (~18x66) and Orion Ultrablock filter from dark skies (1500m high). Next new moon I'll try with my Canon 18x50. It is a very spectacular DSO with a 12" scope. 

By the way, does anyone make a narrowband 58mm threaded filter? Or a 58mm to 2" adapter? Canons are threaded for 58mm filters. 



#15 Erik Bakker

Erik Bakker

    Gemini

  • *****
  • Posts: 3160
  • Joined: 10 Aug 2006
  • Loc: The Netherlands, Europe

Posted 08 August 2014 - 04:05 AM

Seeing the Veil depends more on the sky conditions than on the aperture of the instrument used. Under good mag 6+ conditions, I have seen the Veil in my 7x42 binoculars, but the Veil is much easier in my 10x56 binoculars. In the 18x70's the sight becomes magnificent. In the 16" f/5 with a nebular filter it is stunning.

 

In smaller instruments at lower magnifications, the eastern part is much easier to see. 



#16 Special Ed

Special Ed

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 7064
  • Joined: 18 May 2003
  • Loc: Greenbrier County, WV 38N, 80W

Posted 08 August 2014 - 08:50 AM

Now that the images are back up, I thought you guys might like to see this sketch of the Eastern Veil done by PeterDob with 100mm Nexus binoculars.

http://www.cloudynig...d-a-decent-sky/

 

 



#17 RichD

RichD

    Surveyor 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 1980
  • Joined: 08 Nov 2007
  • Loc: Derbyshire, UK

Posted 12 August 2014 - 10:44 AM

It very much depends on your skies. I have had great views of it with a 16x70 from a dark sky, but only glimpsed with a 30x100 from a suburban backyard. The eastern portion (crescent) is definitely the easiest section. An 0III filter is the filter of choice for this object.

 

I have only detected it barely with a 10x50 from a good but not great site. The starfield is very busy and sometimes I find myself seeing imaginary nebulosity in the MW background stars. Good transparent air is a must.

 

In a 12" dob with a widefield eyepiece and 0III filter you can catch filaments within the nebulosity - million dollar view.



#18 Mike B

Mike B

    Starstruck

  • *****
  • Posts: 10111
  • Joined: 06 Apr 2005
  • Loc: shake, rattle, & roll, CA

Posted 12 August 2014 - 01:14 PM

.... see this sketch of the Eastern Veil done by PeterDob with 100mm Nexus binoculars.

http://www.cloudynig...d-a-decent-sky/

Wow, what an amazing sketch! It looks "photographic"! :bow:



#19 mountain monk

mountain monk

    Surveyor 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 1897
  • Joined: 06 Nov 2009
  • Loc: Grand Teton National Park

Posted 12 August 2014 - 08:20 PM

It is visible without filters in my 16x70 Fuji at 7,000-8,000 feet under a gray zone sky. I cannot see it with my 8x42 Nikon or my 7x50 Vixen. But that seems sort of like a stunt; it's much, much finer in a scope with an O-III.

 

Dark skies.

 

Jack



#20 SMark

SMark

    Apollo

  • *****
  • Posts: 1106
  • Joined: 29 Aug 2011
  • Loc: Atlanta, GA USA

Posted 13 August 2014 - 12:10 AM

The smallest optic I saw it was the WO 66ED with a Vixen LVW 22mm (~18x66) and Orion Ultrablock filter from dark skies (1500m high). Next new moon I'll try with my Canon 18x50. It is a very spectacular DSO with a 12" scope. 

By the way, does anyone make a narrowband 58mm threaded filter? Or a 58mm to 2" adapter? Canons are threaded for 58mm filters. 

I think you are referring something along these lines...

 

http://www.ebay.com/... to 48mm Filter



#21 paulsky

paulsky

    Viking 1

  • -----
  • Posts: 502
  • Joined: 17 Feb 2004

Posted 13 August 2014 - 05:21 PM

Hello,

 I use a Canon 18X50 IS binocular for fabulous vistas of Veil Nebula, with adapter ring to 2" OIII and 2" UHC in each ocular!!

Fantastic vision!

Regards

Paul



#22 17.5Dob

17.5Dob

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 773
  • Joined: 21 Mar 2013
  • Loc: Colorado,USA

Posted 15 August 2014 - 10:19 PM

The other night, while imaging at my Bortle 2 (grey) zone, I was passing the time by star watching with my 11 X 65's and I had no difficulty at all in seeing both sides of the Veil. M51 was so bright and detailed, I believe it would have been borderline naked eye visible.

This is how dark the skies were, 20 minutes BEFORE astronomical twilight even stared.

 

14931520292_27b1531d49_c.jpg

 

 



#23 hallelujah

hallelujah

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5134
  • Joined: 14 Jul 2006
  • Loc: North Star over Colorado

Posted 15 August 2014 - 11:43 PM

What is your altitude?

 

Stan



#24 17.5Dob

17.5Dob

    Viking 1

  • *****
  • Posts: 773
  • Joined: 21 Mar 2013
  • Loc: Colorado,USA

Posted 16 August 2014 - 12:17 AM

What is your altitude?

 

Stan

 

If that was directed towards me, the photo and my description were from 8,700', just north of the CO/WY border and several west of civilization, paved roads etc. but only a 63 min drive from, my house.


Edited by 17.5Dob, 16 August 2014 - 12:17 AM.


#25 hallelujah

hallelujah

    Fly Me to the Moon

  • *****
  • Posts: 5134
  • Joined: 14 Jul 2006
  • Loc: North Star over Colorado

Posted 16 August 2014 - 10:40 AM

Thank you.

 

Stan








Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics