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Can we talk about the color of the night sky where you are?

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#26 Ptarmigan

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 10:30 PM

I starwatch in a white zone. If a cold front comes, I have better seeing and can see objects that are not normally visible due to light pollution and other pollutants in the sky. I have seen M53 and M79 in a light polluted sky despite the fact they are not listed as being visible in a urban sky. I have also seen M77. 



#27 Tony Flanders

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Posted 22 August 2014 - 05:48 AM

I have seen M53 and M79 in a light polluted sky despite the fact they are not listed as being visible in a urban sky.


Hunh? Who doesn't list them? M53 is a bright, concentrated globular cluster, one of the easiest objects in the entire sky for urban observers. And the only problem with M79 for mid-northern observers is its somewhat southerly declination.

See my Urban and Suburban Messier Guide for information on the other M-objects.

#28 WesC

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Posted 22 August 2014 - 01:47 PM

My sky is gray at the zenith and pale orange to the south and east.... I has a sad. :/



#29 galexand

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Posted 22 August 2014 - 02:24 PM

I read they make these eyepieces with "illuminated reticule." That means it not only has crosshairs (which can be useful if you're actually making precise measurements), but the lines light up. I thought that was the dumbest thing ever, so I asked on here and someone said if the sky is black, you can't see the lines against the sky.

 

Blew my mind.  I'm still not sure I believe it.



#30 Star-gaze69

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Posted 22 August 2014 - 02:40 PM

I read they make these eyepieces with "illuminated reticule." That means it not only has crosshairs (which can be useful if you're actually making precise measurements), but the lines light up. I thought that was the dumbest thing ever, so I asked on here and someone said if the sky is black, you can't see the lines against the sky.

 

Blew my mind.  I'm still not sure I believe it.

I own one, although I haven't used it yet. Mine's a Celestron CrossAim 12.5mm, and it's mainly used as an star alignment aid for my Go-To telescope.



#31 BigC

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Posted 22 August 2014 - 03:21 PM

I read they make these eyepieces with "illuminated reticule." That means it not only has crosshairs (which can be useful if you're actually making precise measurements), but the lines light up. I thought that was the dumbest thing ever, so I asked on here and someone said if the sky is black, you can't see the lines against the sky.

 

Blew my mind.  I'm still not sure I believe it.

I am in a yellow or brown zone depending on which LP map ,although there was another LP map I can't seem to find that  this spring  showed my little valley as small dark green patch. 

Anyway on a Moonless night with low humidity and no gunk in the air to reflect the 5 mile distant city lights an illuminated finder could be useful.



#32 davidpitre

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Posted 22 August 2014 - 07:19 PM

Again, "pin point" stars have nothing to do with light pollution. You can have sharp defined stars under white or black class skies.



#33 Ptarmigan

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 09:40 PM

 


Hunh? Who doesn't list them? M53 is a bright, concentrated globular cluster, one of the easiest objects in the entire sky for urban observers. And the only problem with M79 for mid-northern observers is its somewhat southerly declination.

See my Urban and Suburban Messier Guide for information on the other M-objects.

 

 

Astronomy League Urban Deep Sky List

http://www.astroleag...an/urbanld.html

 

I checked the list and did not see M53 or M79.



#34 AlBoning

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Posted 28 August 2014 - 08:15 AM

I often make the 8 mile drive to take advantage of a darker observing field.  There's no difference in the sky conditions though.  Often I've stepped outside at home checked the sky, saw it was clear, made the drive, and discovered upon arrival that there was a high, thin, transparent cloud deck.  Other times it is a broken cloud deck.  But in either case I couldn't see it naked eye at home because of the ground level light pollution.  Of course, whether at home or on the darker field the scope sees the cloud deck just fine.


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