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5" Refractors

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#101 mikey cee

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Posted 23 November 2014 - 06:50 PM

Hal I personally find the achromats blue halos around the brighter stars much more acceptable than bright secondary spikes on stars. The blue light is naturally there to begin with but the artifacts created by spiders is wholly added man made stuff! :smirk:  Mike



#102 sawsatch

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Posted 23 November 2014 - 09:26 PM

I have an SV 80 ED f/7 and soon will have the SV 110 ED f/7.

I have the SV M2 mount and tripod. Vic at SV recently had a sale on the few 130 EDs left but that would have meant a heavier mount. The ES 127 Carbon Fiber

f/7.5 only weighs 14 pounds and that makes it tempting.

I'm only hesitant about the optics and if the  33% increase in light is worth it.



#103 gmavrom

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Posted 23 November 2014 - 10:16 PM

I've been in astronomy on an off for over 45 years, tarted with a timy 40mm scope since then I've owned several scts 8-10 inc a mk7, dob, celestron 8s and a meade 127 APO refractor. It had to give the best planatery views sas did the Meade Mak 7 but at half the weight. Now I just sold my celestar and want to buy another scope. Thinking about a 127mm F9.4 achro but can't  find any or that 4" planet killer which is expensive for a 4 inch achro but still a nice scope but reading all these posts I think for the planets the 5 will be better.


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#104 gunfighter48

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Posted 23 November 2014 - 10:36 PM

I went against the grain here. I looked at the 5" scopes when I got aperture fever but 6" scopes were too appealing. I have a 4" C102GT and it's a great scope. I use it on a Orion Skyview Pro Goto mount. It's easy to move, setup and take down, and the views are very good. But ES had the AR152 for $850 and I couldn't pass it up. I also didn't have the money available for a APO, just not in my budget range. I bought a CGEM goto mount for it and yes it's heavy and it also streched my budget to the limit.  But I break it down into 3 parts, the head assembly goes into a Pelecan 1650 case. The tripod goes into an Orion Soft case and the AR152 goes into a wooden case that I got from Road Cases America. Even with a bad back I am able to load these into the back of my 1/2 ton pickup, as long as I don't do it more than twice a night!! The views going from the 4" to the 6" are fantastic. Yes it's got some CA but not as much as the C102GT (which doesn't have much) and it doesn't bother me. The Orion Nebula is just outstanding in the 6".  The scope weights 25lbs with the finder and I just bought a used C9.25 and it weights 22lbs without a finder, so the weight factor for me isn't that much of an issue. I'm 66 and as I get older and weaker I might down size to a 4" or 5", maybe even an APO.  But as long as I can set it up I"ll stay with the 6", bigger is better. :grin:



#105 Starhawk

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Posted 23 November 2014 - 10:40 PM

Look through a good 5" APO and the question this thread is based on seems absurd.

 

-Rich


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#106 sawsatch

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Posted 23 November 2014 - 10:52 PM

If the conversion factor is 2.54 cm. = 1 inch, than isn't a 5" refractor a 127mm telescope?



#107 Starhawk

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Posted 24 November 2014 - 10:32 AM

I think we have converged on 5" as a class because they have a huge amount of history at that size.  There was an old rule of thumb of a 5" unobstructed telescope showing the full resolution through the atmosphere, for example (it dates from the pre-digital age).  Fairly obvious steps in performance are widely noted from around 4" (102mm), 5"(127mm), and 6"(152mm) sizes.  Since the manufacturers make 120mm, 127mm, 130mm, and 140mm instruments which are all carried by the same size of mount, it makes sense to talk about them as a class as the traditional size they are based on: 5".

 

-Rich



#108 Peter Besenbruch

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Posted 24 November 2014 - 03:03 PM

I purchased a 120mm (4.7") tube assembly for three reasons:

 

Price. $1360, including shipping is still affordable.

 

Performance. 4.7" reaches significantly further than 4", and shows lunar and planetary detail roughly equal to a 6" reflector. For deepsky work, when I can see the dark lane in NGC 891under hazy skies, I consider it decent as a deepsky instrument. Stars snap into focus, and look beautiful (think Trapezium at 180x). It's also versatile enough to show the Pleiades and its surroundings at 23x.

 

Ergonomics. I mount it on a CG5. With pads, the damp time is under a second. That makes the scope easily transportable AND rock solid. A 6" will show more, but will need a beefier mount. A 4" needs a similar sized mount, but shows less.



#109 sawsatch

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Posted 24 November 2014 - 03:11 PM

How good are the optics of the Carbon ES 127 APO? Will I see a lot more than with my SV 110 ED? SV optics are excellent so I wonder if the 33% increase in light gathering of the ES will give me that much more.



#110 BKBrown

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Posted 25 November 2014 - 12:23 PM

I love a good refractor and have a few in the line up. My SW100ED f/9 has remarkably good optics and an aftermarket MoonLite dual speed focuser in a light weight package, so I have the 4" grab-n-go slot covered. My big Apo is a TEC 140 that will be with me pretty much until I cash in, it is beautiful in every respect. Having looked through any number of 6" Apo refractors belonging to others, I just don't feel that my TEC at 5.5" is giving up much of anything to them in any category. At only 19 pounds and comparatively short in length, it is easy and economical to mount, and I don't cringe when putting it up or taking it down in the dark. Not sure I would feel that way about a high end 6" triplet. 12mm is just not buying that much more in a triplet and it takes a significantly bigger chunk out of the wallet. There may well be a 120 in the future to fill the void between the 4" and 5.5", but not anything larger. My next step up is a superb example of the C11 Edge HD with all the whistles and bells...and there is not a 6" made that will challenge it going deep...

 

Clear Skies,

Brian

 

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Edited by BKBrown, 25 November 2014 - 12:24 PM.


#111 mikegro

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Posted 25 November 2014 - 01:47 PM

I love a good refractor and have a few in the line up. My SW100ED f/9 has remarkably good optics and an aftermarket MoonLite dual speed focuser in a light weight package, so I have the 4" grab-n-go slot covered. My big Apo is a TEC 140 that will be with me pretty much until I cash in, it is beautiful in every respect. Having looked through any number of 6" Apo refractors belonging to others, I just don't feel that my TEC at 5.5" is giving up much of anything to them in any category. At only 19 pounds and comparatively short in length, it is easy and economical to mount, and I don't cringe when putting it up or taking it down in the dark. Not sure I would feel that way about a high end 6" triplet. 12mm is just not buying that much more in a triplet and it takes a significantly bigger chunk out of the wallet. There may well be a 120 in the future to fill the void between the 4" and 5.5", but not anything larger. My next step up is a superb example of the C11 Edge HD with all the whistles and bells...and there is not a 6" made that will challenge it going deep...

 

Clear Skies,

Brian

 

That's a beautiful observing platform, Brian!  An almost perfect combination to do just about everything, visually and imaging.

 

I don't own a 5" refractor (nor a 4") but I have a 3" and a 6".  My little 80mm ED80 has certainly spoiled me with CA-free views and feather-light weight.  It leaves me wondering if I'm already at the "sweet spot" of ultra-portability for quick sessions on the back porch (easily move mount+OTA together).  My 6" achro refractor is certainly manageable to carry in and out of the house, of course separate from the mount, but it's probably not going on any trips with me (won't fit in my vehicles very easily, and I don't have a case).  Also, with the 6" achro the CA on planets is a bit of a bummer but for the price it was a steal and the bright wide field views are mesmerizing.  I'm eyeballing a 102mm triplet apo (ES CF ED102) to "replace" the ED80 and the Meade 6000 130mm triplet apo for more serious visual work on planets...potentially replacing the AR152...and easily fitting in my car for transport (35" long case easily fits in the trunk without folding down the seats).

 

What I'm learning quickly by reading these forums is that it's common for folks to justify spending lots of their money on more than one telescope, and especially on more than one refractor!   :lol:

 

-Mike


Edited by mikegro, 25 November 2014 - 01:49 PM.


#112 BKBrown

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Posted 25 November 2014 - 09:23 PM

 

I love a good refractor and have a few in the line up. My SW100ED f/9 has remarkably good optics and an aftermarket MoonLite dual speed focuser in a light weight package, so I have the 4" grab-n-go slot covered. My big Apo is a TEC 140 that will be with me pretty much until I cash in, it is beautiful in every respect. Having looked through any number of 6" Apo refractors belonging to others, I just don't feel that my TEC at 5.5" is giving up much of anything to them in any category. At only 19 pounds and comparatively short in length, it is easy and economical to mount, and I don't cringe when putting it up or taking it down in the dark. Not sure I would feel that way about a high end 6" triplet. 12mm is just not buying that much more in a triplet and it takes a significantly bigger chunk out of the wallet. There may well be a 120 in the future to fill the void between the 4" and 5.5", but not anything larger. My next step up is a superb example of the C11 Edge HD with all the whistles and bells...and there is not a 6" made that will challenge it going deep...

 

Clear Skies,

Brian

 

That's a beautiful observing platform, Brian!  An almost perfect combination to do just about everything, visually and imaging.

 

I don't own a 5" refractor (nor a 4") but I have a 3" and a 6".  My little 80mm ED80 has certainly spoiled me with CA-free views and feather-light weight.  It leaves me wondering if I'm already at the "sweet spot" of ultra-portability for quick sessions on the back porch (easily move mount+OTA together).  My 6" achro refractor is certainly manageable to carry in and out of the house, of course separate from the mount, but it's probably not going on any trips with me (won't fit in my vehicles very easily, and I don't have a case).  Also, with the 6" achro the CA on planets is a bit of a bummer but for the price it was a steal and the bright wide field views are mesmerizing.  I'm eyeballing a 102mm triplet apo (ES CF ED102) to "replace" the ED80 and the Meade 6000 130mm triplet apo for more serious visual work on planets...potentially replacing the AR152...and easily fitting in my car for transport (35" long case easily fits in the trunk without folding down the seats).

 

What I'm learning quickly by reading these forums is that it's common for folks to justify spending lots of their money on more than one telescope, and especially on more than one refractor!   :lol:

 

-Mike

 

 

Thanks Mike,

 

This is the retirement package I have been working toward, it does just about everything I need done scope-wise. I think the ES 102ED and Meade 6000 130mm would make a fabulous pair of additions to your line up...all kinds of capability there. As you noted above, lots of folks have more than one scope, often more than one refractor. Many of us are into imaging as well as observing, and different focal lengths and apertures allow us to do many different imaging tasks; sort of like a photographer with a case full of different lenses only cooler :grin:

 

Clear Skies,

Brian


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#113 Kevin Barker

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Posted 26 November 2014 - 02:53 AM

I have to say I love 5 inch refractors and have enjoyed reading this thread.

 

I own three at present. A slightly under 5 inch homemade f-6.5 wooden contraption which rides on a Dob type mount. Great for a scan or for use under a dark sky. It weight is at about 12 pounds and is very crudely made with a secondary mounted on a broom stick. I call it the Barkonian!!! and a friend is using it at present.

 

Another homemade SS lensed 127/1200 which is in a home made ota in a PVC tube. It resides in the South Island at my brothers house. It is a good all rounder with good optics. It is only about 11 pounds.

 

A Zeiss APQ130/1000 which is top notch. It delivers pretty impressive images of planets etc and splits stars amazingly well. It is a true high end apo. It is about 21 pounds +/- I only ever use it in the ebst seeing conditions and usually use it with a binoviewer.

 

5 inch is a great size. Any bigger and you need to think seriously about how to mount the beast.

 

One scope which others have mentioned and I think must be pretty impressive in the TEC 140. It is lighter than the APQ130, can be bought and by all accounts renders planets etc pretty good!! I'd love to look through one one of these days!!

 

The piccie shows the Barkonian and the Zeiss in my back yard!!

 

Kevin



#114 Kevin Barker

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Posted 26 November 2014 - 03:01 AM

I have to say I love 5 inch refractors and have enjoyed reading this thread.

 

I own three at present. A slightly under 5 inch homemade f-6.5 wooden contraption which rides on a Dob type mount. Great for a scan or for use under a dark sky. It weight is at about 12 pounds and is very crudely made with a secondary mounted on a broom stick. I call it the Barkonian!!! and a friend is using it at present.

 

Another homemade SS lensed 127/1200 which is in a home made ota in a PVC tube. It resides in the South Island at my brothers house. It is a good all rounder with good optics. It is only about 11 pounds.

 

A Zeiss APQ130/1000 which is top notch. It delivers pretty impressive images of planets etc and splits stars amazingly well. It is a true high end apo. It is about 21 pounds +/- I only ever use it in the ebst seeing conditions and usually use it with a binoviewer.

 

5 inch is a great size. Any bigger and you need to think seriously about how to mount the beast.

 

One scope which others have mentioned and I think must be pretty impressive in the TEC 140. It is lighter than the APQ130, can be bought and by all accounts renders planets etc pretty good!! I'd love to look through one one of these days!!

 

The piccie shows the Barkonian and the Zeiss in my back yard!!

 

Kevin

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