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Esprit 80mm or 100mm?

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#1 Seanem44

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 08:39 PM

I currently have an AT65EDQ and  am looking to upgrade to something bigger and better.  The Skywatcher Esprit looks to be affordable with great optics.  Granted 80mm is not a huge jump from 65, however, is the difference between the 80mm and 100mm enough to justify me laying down an extra $1K?  Also, I image primarily from a red/white zone.  Thanks!


Edited by Seanem44, 20 August 2014 - 08:40 PM.


#2 BillP

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 09:42 PM

Given that you have a C9.25, I would opt for the 80mm because it is such a nice and portable aperture so more flexible...I would only go with the 100 if planetary is a big deal for you with this scope.  And a 31T5 will get you 6 full degrees in the 80mm!!!  Holy Cow!!



#3 bicparker

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 10:15 PM

Go with the 100mm if you can swing it.  I think it is a good long term investment.  You get a considerable difference in aperture with only a comparatively small difference in focal length (550mm versus 400 for the 80mm).  So you will still have a wide field of view and more aperture.  Plus, you will have a scope you can grow into more as time goes on.  It has a beefy focuser, for if and when you decide to scale up your camera(s).  The additional aperture will give you the chance to go deeper in your exposures with more resolution.  

 
There are very few nice 100mm class telescopes with that fast a focal ratio or faster.  Telescopes in that class are generally a lot more expensive, too.  So this telescope represents a very good bargain for some very nice optics.   
 
I am thoroughly enjoying mine (I have it primarily as a visual instrument).  Some friends (who are very experienced at imaging) have used this scope in their imaging at the Comanche Springs Astronomy Campus and the results have been very impressive.  Talking with them, they were very high on its quality and usability as an imaging instrument.

 

gallery_7878_4590_1884648.jpeg



#4 maadscientist

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Posted 20 August 2014 - 10:56 PM

Hey Sean,

 

I have the AT 65 and am testing the Esprit 120. May I ask what is happening with the 65 that is causing you to want to make a mostly sideways move in focal length?

 

Dan L



#5 Seanem44

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 06:00 AM

Dan, nothing in particular. I love the little AT65.  Basically, the 925 is too big for my condo and I hardly use it.  I Need something I can both image with and use for observing.


Edited by Seanem44, 21 August 2014 - 08:42 AM.


#6 Tim

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 08:28 AM

Having just got my 80mm Esprit I am happy with it..  I do like the captains wheel and knob underneath the focuser that locks position works very well.  I would say if your into viewing planets and objects at higher power than perhaps the larger size is the way to go.  if you your needs are more for being portable and lighter then the 80mm



#7 maadscientist

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 09:21 AM

Dan, nothing in particular. I love the little AT65.  Basically, the 925 is too big for my condo and I hardly use it.  I Need something I can both image with and use for observing.

Sean,

 

Given your response,  Bicparker is correct, go with the 100.

 

Dan L



#8 Seanem44

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 09:27 AM

Dan, that's the direction I am leaning.  After the AHSP star party this weekend, I am going to likely sell my AT65, using the funds to supplement a trade in of my CPC 925 for a Esprit 100.

 

i have heard to stick with the triplet as the quintet had some significant issues.  Is this accurate?



#9 bicparker

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 10:05 AM

There were apparently some collimation problems with the early production models of the quintet.  I think those items have been resolved, but also I don't think you can buy it through USA distribution channels (possibly Canada, however).   In any case, I would simply get the regular triplet.  It comes with a field flattener for when you image and when you want to just use it visually, you operate with the FF off.  

 

Since you have a Nikon, you will need to get the Nikon adapter (it is pretty inexpensive) since it comes with a Canon adapter.

 

In the USA edition, you get a very nice and sturdy case (that in itself is a big bonus), a field flattener, rings (with screws), a Losmandy style D plate (you can use a Vixen plate with the rings, however, as I do), the field flattener, a right angle finder (that is pretty decent, I actually don't use it much because of the enormous FOV at low power), a very good diagonal, the Canon adapter, and a ring adapter for the FF and camera fittings.  Unlike the Canada version, you do not get any eyepieces (but in Canada, they leave something else out that we get in the USA version, I just can't remember what it is), but that really isn't a big deal to me since I already have a pretty extensive eyepiece collection and don't really want any more "kit" eyepieces.



#10 Seanem44

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 10:09 AM

I actually use a modified 1100D now.  Couldn't bring my self to mod the 800.  That's a lot if bonuses that come with it.  I've heard for imaging purposes, these rival so e if the Taks, though some will say blasphemy.  



#11 bicparker

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 10:44 AM

Without respect to a Tak, this is a very good imaging platform and I don't think you will use up its utility for that purpose.  This is certainly a scope you will be able to grow with as you continue to use it.

 

Though most will think of this as strictly an imaging platform, it is actually an excellent visual instrument, too.  It is a bit different because of its shorter focal ratio (and FL!) than you would normally find for a 100mm class refractor, but the views are very impressive.  With the fine optics, it is easier to tease out the fine details and structures in extended objects and it responds to filters quite well.  

 

At TSP this year, I was actually working some of the easier parts of the Advanced Observing list as well as the regular TSP Observing List (which is basically a Herschel 400 class list for the most part.... you have to employ good finding and observing skills but it still includes a few "eye candy" objects, as well).   One thing I found was that I could really push the magnification hard on this telescope (and the others in this series).  The stars stayed tight and object details  (planets and the moon for the most part) were crisp.   For the most part, I was using Ethos (13, 6, 3.7mm) and Nagler (12, 17, 22 T4's, 26 T5, 5T6, 3.5T6) eyepieces, though I did throw in a couple of Radians and a 41Pan a few times, also.  I also used an Ultima Barlow for higher magnifications. 

 

This is a fun instrument, and while I am mostly a dedicated big dob observer, I can see I will be having a lot of fun with this "finder" scope for many years to come.



#12 skyward_eyes

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 11:48 AM

There are in fact two models of the Esprit 100 if you look in Europe and possibly Canada. One model was the five element Esprit 100SFS and the other is the Esprit 100EDT that you see available through Sky-Watcher USA. We pulled the plug on the five element because it did not hold collimation correctly. We hope to revisit this optical lay out in the future.

 

So currently the Esprit 100ED triplet is available. This is turning out to be our most popular model due to its size and speed. Here in the US we sell the scope with the field flattener, in Canada and else where it is separate. They do give you an ok eyepiece but we thought the flattener was a better option. 


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#13 Seanem44

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 11:53 AM

Thanks!



#14 cherokawa

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Posted 21 August 2014 - 03:09 PM

I'm kinda in the same boat as you, Sean. So I hope you don't mind me asking this question on your thread - does anyone know if the esprit scopes work well with any reducers? I realize the scopes are already fast, but would be nice to have the flexibility to use a reducer to get an even wider field of view for imaging. Just curious. 



#15 maadscientist

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Posted 22 August 2014 - 01:55 PM

I'm kinda in the same boat as you, Sean. So I hope you don't mind me asking this question on your thread - does anyone know if the esprit scopes work well with any reducers? I realize the scopes are already fast, but would be nice to have the flexibility to use a reducer to get an even wider field of view for imaging. Just curious. 

 

Probably not. Kevin is the final word on this, but the Esprit 100 F5 is a remarkable scope in that it is a native f5 triplet with a dedicated flattner. This design is difficult to pull off, as it is in the zone where the Petzval design starts to be where manufacturers go (see Televue NP101) The problem is the petzval requires a much longer tube, negating the portability factor. Skywatcher has managed to give you the best of both worlds, an optic that is first class, wide field f5, short tube portable. Applying and aftermarket reducer will probably destroy the sophisticated design need to make this work.

 

If you need to go below 500mm FL, might as well get a camera lens for imaging . My 2 cents

 

Dan L 



#16 DRodrigues

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 04:34 PM

...

I am thoroughly enjoying mine (I have it primarily as a visual instrument)...
 

 

David,

Do you see much field curvature on visual use?



#17 skyward_eyes

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 06:25 PM

There are no reducers to my knowledge for the Esprit 80 or 100. They are both very fast scopes already. I am sure a reducer could be created but it would be for small chip cameras. 



#18 bicparker

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Posted 24 August 2014 - 08:14 PM

 

...

I am thoroughly enjoying mine (I have it primarily as a visual instrument)...
 

 

David,

Do you see much field curvature on visual use?

 

Not really.  I use mostly Ethos EPs and they tend to flatten fields pretty nicely.   The other EPs I used were Naglers (T4 and T5).  But I haven't really noticed any significant field curvature in any case.



#19 dr.who

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Posted 25 August 2014 - 12:04 AM

I would second (or third or fourth) the recommendation to go at least 100mm. However if you are looking at this to be your all around visual and AP scope I would suggest you look at the 120mm. It's slower at f/7 BUT it is an amazing scope for it's cost both visually and for AP. That extra 20mm does make a difference and takes the scope close (1/4" away) to the "sweet spot" of refractor's… The 5". Having viewed through this scope myself I can tell you the planetary and DSO views are stunning and it's about $1,000 USD less than the Tak TSA-120 BEFORE you buy all the accessories you need to so the TSA-120 can be used for visual and AP.

 

A 5" APO refractor with all the bell's and whistles that the Esprit provides out of the box makes it worth it. 



#20 jerry10137

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Posted 26 August 2014 - 11:00 AM

For anyone that would like to see some photos from these fine scopes....here ya go!  I'm an Esprit lifer and love working with them....I have some serious plans for imaging this fall and winter on a 150mm and the good ol' 100mm.

 

M31 - Esprit 100

M31_Final_SMALL2.jpg

Details

 

NGC1499 - Esprit 80

NGC1499_Final_Small.jpg

Details

 

Rosette - Esprit 100

Rosette_Final_Small.jpg

Details


Edited by jerry10137, 26 August 2014 - 11:05 AM.

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#21 agavephoto

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Posted 26 August 2014 - 07:28 PM

I've not used the 80mm, but I'm very happy with the 100mm and highly recommend it. Here's a recent shot of M31 with a 5D2, ISO 1600, eight 6-min exposures: 

Attached Files


Edited by agavephoto, 26 August 2014 - 07:42 PM.

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#22 Tim

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Posted 26 August 2014 - 09:11 PM

I've not used the 80mm, but I'm very happy with the 100mm and highly recommend it. Here's a recent shot of M31 with a 5D2, ISO 1600, eight 6-min exposures: 

 

 

Very nice! is this the full shot or did you crop it afterwards - looking forward to getting my 80 out.



#23 agavephoto

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Posted 26 August 2014 - 09:29 PM

 

I've not used the 80mm, but I'm very happy with the 100mm and highly recommend it. Here's a recent shot of M31 with a 5D2, ISO 1600, eight 6-min exposures: 

 

 

Very nice! is this the full shot or did you crop it afterwards - looking forward to getting my 80 out.

 

 

Thanks, Tim. That is ~82% of the pixels after stacking. I cropped a bit off the top/bottom to make it 16:10 aspect ratio as well as some from the right because I didn't center M31.


Edited by agavephoto, 26 August 2014 - 09:36 PM.


#24 bicparker

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Posted 27 August 2014 - 10:11 AM

For anyone that would like to see some photos from these fine scopes....here ya go!  I'm an Esprit lifer and love working with them....I have some serious plans for imaging this fall and winter on a 150mm and the good ol' 100mm.

 

 

Excellent shots, Jerry!


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#25 Seanem44

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Posted 27 August 2014 - 11:39 AM

The focal length is shorter than most 100mm refractors.  500 approx. as opposed to 700mm or so.  Does this seem to be an issue, do you like this? Now I am trying to decide between the 100mm Esprit or other class scopes like the stellervues that offer a little deeper image.








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