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#1 cpper

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Posted 22 August 2014 - 02:59 PM

Hello  :D 

 

It's the first time I transport my telescope with a car. People here told me that with the scope(and base) in the car, only one passenger can fit inside. Well we were 4 in the car, sitting comfortable, along with the scope, base and some camping stuff. The passengers on the back seat were holding the scope on their laps, this is the "secret". Maybe some of you haven't thought at this, and this might help :)

 

We drove to a theoretical blue zone, where a friend has some land and a caravan. The sky was blue the entire day, but in the evening, some clouds rolled in. It was getting dark and I was waiting for Saturn and Mars to pop. After a while, two close points were visible in the S-W sky. I assembled quickly my scope to see Saturn. I centered the orange 'star' in my finder and took a deep breath - it was the first time I was going to see ringed planet. I looked through the 25mm eyepiece, adjusted the focus, and saw the bright planet. I was disappointed, no rings were visible, only a orange disc. "That's all ?" I said sadly... But quickly after that I realized I was actually viewing Mars. I centered the other orange 'star' in my finder, took a deeper breath and viewed through the eyepiece.  :jawdrop: - You must be kidding, now that's something ! The rings were as bright as the planet and clearly visible, amazing ! I called everyone there to see it too, and there were just "No way"s, "Wow"s and "Incredible"s. Afterwards I got back to Mars, but wasn't able to make out any detail, even with the 10mm eyepiece. I guess the seeing wasn't great. I got back to Saturn and marveled a little more.Then I put my Neodymium filter on, and what I guess was a lack of turbulences in the air made me think that the filter is magic. The outlines were considerable sharper. Then the clouds ate Saturn and Mars. 

 

It was dark now but there were some clouds in the sky. The sky was not so dark as I expected. In my holiday at the seaside, in a green to blue zone, the sky was much more darker. I don't know why, maybe you have a clue. I suspect there was a cover of thin clouds. The humidity was also extremely high, the scope, mount, grass and everything was so wet, you could say it was raining. Could this affect the transparency so bad ?  In spite of the humidity and bad transparency I saw some things, here the highlights: Lagoon, Trifid, Andromeda and it's two neighbours , Triangulum, Ring, Dumbbell, the Double Cluster, Pleiades, M11, M13, NCG 6905, NGC 6826 and last but not last, Comet Jacques. It was bright, also easily visible in my 10x50's. However, I could not see any tail. 

In the morning I was able to see Jupiter and Venus. I could make out the cloud bands, but everything was pretty blurry, I suspect the seeing again. 

 

To "review" my eyepieces, 25mm and 10mm Super Plossls, which came with the scope: I'm pleased with the 25mm. It always provides sharp views, stars are pinpoint, has ok eye relief and it's comfortable. The 10mm instead, has very little eye relief, making me think that the aFov is way smaller(Anyway I think it is). You have to press you eye to the eyepiece to get in the entire field of view. The twist up eyecup is useless, you can't see the entire field of view unless you twisted it up. When twisted up, it gets instantly greased by the eyebrows. When I change back to the 25mm the aFov seems a lot bigger. Now about it's sharpness. I was viewing some birds on a cable some hundreds of meters away in the last evening, and to my surprise, it was the first time I was able to get 'perfect' sharpness with the 10mm. I was really surprised, because it was the first time it provided really sharp views. This makes me think that the seeing is to blame. To conclude, if the 10mm had longer eye relief it would also be a  nice eyepiece.

Can't  wait to compare the 25mm with the 13mm Ethos which will arrive in a few days. The only thing they share is the tFov, 1.08°.

 

Thank you for reading my long post :)


Edited by cpper, 22 August 2014 - 03:00 PM.


#2 tigerroach

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Posted 22 August 2014 - 03:14 PM

Congrats on seeing Saturn for the first time. :cool:

 

Don't worry that you couldn't see details on Mars, it is really too small and far away now for that. In a couple years there will be another conjunction, be ready to try it then!


Edited by tigerroach, 22 August 2014 - 03:14 PM.


#3 ggalilei

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Posted 22 August 2014 - 03:33 PM

First time training a telescope on Saturn, there is nothing like that. I still remember how incredibly exciting it was 50 years later even if my first view was through a one-inch aperture refractor.

I think you'll be amazed by the views in the 13mm Ethos, I know I was. I find the Ethos line very comfortable to use, as well as providing excellent views.

Sounds like you had a thoroughly enjoyable night, and I wish you many more to come!



#4 Billytk

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Posted 22 August 2014 - 04:00 PM

The 10mm EP that comes with the scope is terrible in my opinion. Spend a little money and get one that you will be happy with. I am very impressed with the Explore Scientific 82* eyepieces for the money. The 8.8mm and 6.7mm I have are excellent. Even the 4.7 is quite good to use when seeing allows. Speaking of which, it sounds like seeing was not good. Also Jupiter and Saturn are quite low in the sky for good viewing right now. Too much atmosphere to look through. In the coming months Jupiter will be getting higher in the sky while Saturn will be getting lower. Keep at it and let us know how that Ethos performs.



#5 cpper

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Posted 22 August 2014 - 06:01 PM

Thank you guys  :grin:

Might the high humidity level be the reason for the bad transparency ?

I will also barlow my Ethos, making it 6.5mm, more suitable for planets.

 

Here is my boy and...the clouds:

 

FQW9BEg.jpg


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#6 ggalilei

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Posted 22 August 2014 - 06:45 PM

Nice location, and pretty clouds!

I don't know about your location, but I can tell you that mine is very humid and on a number of occasions the sky remained clear but a thin fog started developing from the ground up and I did not notice it until it reached some height, at which point the stars started disappearing. It was in effect the same as the sky being cloudy. Another effect I noticed occasionally is the presence of a layer of thin clouds (cirrocumulus, I think they are called) that are invisible at night but they do make stars blurry. The first time I had no idea of what was happening, the sky seemed clear and yet all the stars were out of focus even to the naked eye, pretty freaky.



#7 Billytk

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Posted 22 August 2014 - 08:45 PM

If the stars are twinkling a lot then seeing is bad. If they are not twinkling much or not at all, GET YOUR SCOPE OUT!!! Seeing is good. Yes humidity will cause bad seeing. Also other factors in the upper atmosphere will cause bad seeing.



#8 cpper

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Posted 23 August 2014 - 03:23 AM

Antonio, as you also said, I remember the stars begun to disappear slowly, but no cloud was visible. So,  that  thin fog-like clouds must have been the problem.

Billy, the stars were not twinkling I remember. As far as I know, twinkling stars affect the seeing, but I was concerned about transparency, since I was viewing DSO's .



#9 Dadadee

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Posted 23 August 2014 - 08:14 AM

Nice report buddy.

 

my wife, zero interest for astronomy, always ask to see Saturn.  When she talks to our friends about what she calls my 'way too expensive hobby', she always admits, that despite everything, looking at Saturn is a joy!

 

Andi, looking at Jupiter with a 6mm eyepiece should have on you a similar result.  It is just amazing!

 

Ben


Edited by Dadadee, 23 August 2014 - 08:17 AM.

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