Jump to content


Photo

SPECTROSCOPY for AMATEUR ASTRONOMERS

  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 buynoski

buynoski

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 5
  • Joined: 07 Jun 2014
  • Loc: Palo Alto, Ca.

Posted 23 August 2014 - 09:55 AM

Not into “heavy scientific” work? Just want to enjoy the colorful rainbows of other stars, or see the fascinating absorption line detail in the solar spectrum? A number of options, some quite inexpensive, are available to display spectra for you.

Click here to view the article

#2 JimK

JimK

    Skygazer

  • *****
  • Posts: 832
  • Joined: 18 Sep 2005
  • Loc: Albuquerque, NM USA

Posted 23 August 2014 - 11:52 AM

I was surprised that the book "Astronomical Spectroscopy for Amateurs" by Ken M. Harrison (2011) was omitted from the 13 references that spanned a wide variety of spectroscopy-related topics, including theoretical college & professional levels.  And I thought that Ken's book was considered "better" than the presentations of six authors in "Practical Amateur Spectroscopy" edited by Stephen F. Tonkin (2013) that was the first reference of the article.

 

I suppose that everyone has their preferences, and not all books suit all readers.



#3 buynoski

buynoski

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 5
  • Joined: 07 Jun 2014
  • Loc: Palo Alto, Ca.

Posted 24 August 2014 - 09:15 AM

That's because I only reported on references that I have read.  Mr. Harrison's I had not run across, and so did not include it; by no means was any slight intended.  Thanks for alerting everyone to the additional reference.  

 

Very recently (since the article was submitted to Cloudy Nights) I got a copy of "Astronomical Spectrography for Amateurs" edited by J.-P. Rozelot and C. Neiner.  This one is a collection of articles of several aspects of amateur spectroscopy (optics, design of spectrographs, data reduction,  spectroscopy as applied to: the Sun, Be stars, nebulae, and comets). It is the proceedings of a school/seminar/conference in France aimed at amateur/professional cooperation.  In a few places the English translation is a bit strange, but overall the book is well worth it.

 

    --M.B.



#4 Stephen Kennedy

Stephen Kennedy

    Mariner 2

  • -----
  • Posts: 237
  • Joined: 03 Jul 2014

Posted 25 August 2014 - 04:26 PM

I have a Rainbow Optics slitless spectroscope and a 210 mm F/7 Newtonian on a very large and precisely driven GEM.  I also have a Canon EOS T3 DSLR camera and a High Point Scientific camera adapter for eyepiece projection astrophotography. 

 

Once I acquire an image of a star or nebula I use a software program from R-Spec that allows me to analyze the spectrums.  I am able to see the Helium lines in O type stars in Orion, the Hydrogen alpha and beta lines in B and A type stars.  Vega and Sirius show particularly strong absorption lines at 4861 angstroms and can be used to calibrate the R-Spec software.  M type stars such as Betelgeuse show a large number of metallic and molecular absorption lines. 

 

I obtained a spectrum of M1, the Crab Nebula, and was able to see a number of bright emission lines.

 

I hope at some point to obtain an OTA with a larger aperture, in the 300 mm to 400 mm range, and obtain the spectrums of quasars and calculate their red-shifts from their spectrums.



#5 buynoski

buynoski

    Lift Off

  • -----
  • Posts: 5
  • Joined: 07 Jun 2014
  • Loc: Palo Alto, Ca.

Posted 29 August 2014 - 11:39 AM

Sounds like you're doing well with this, and probably don't need any hints, but I'd suggest that you look at the data analysis chapter in the book edited by Rozelot and  Neiner (mentioned in the comments above), plus look up the tutorial by Bernd Koch for the DADOS spectrograph.  A great deal of that tutuorial is devoted to data reduction and analysis of spectra (no matter what the camera and telescope used to obtain it), so it should be of use to you.  

 

    --M.B.



#6 Guest_Wesam_*

Guest_Wesam_*
  • -----

Posted 15 September 2014 - 04:01 AM

Thanks for this Article .

 

 

facebookturkish.com








Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics