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Mike Rapchak
professor emeritus


Reged: 11/17/06
Posts: 568
Loc: Indiana, USA
Short Test of Vixen Waterproof 12x80 BCF Binos new
      #1290865 - 12/07/06 08:31 PM

Hello,

Well, after nearly a week I was finally blessed with a clear evening without the Moon to do a short test on my new Vixen Giant "ARK" 12x80 binos. I will qualify "blessed" with the word "relatively" since the light pollution in my area (NW Indiana USA) is terrible. Add to this the fact that every porch-security light in the neighborhood had to have been turned on. The cold (5-10 deg. F) temperatures didn't help, either (my fingers were numb in less than 10 minutes. Brr!).

Other than - or better, in spite of - these less-than-pleasant conditions I must say that I came away quite satisfied.

I am hardly what would be considered technically astute when it comes to evaluating optical instruments; still, I'll do the best I can.

Tecnical/mechanical aspects: IMO these Vixen binos are very well designed. A nice, balanced package. Their weight is around 5 pounds or so, the overall length is 12 3/4 inches. Quite compact when compared with the ponderous 100mm models. The body (barrels, prism hounsings, etc.) are covered with black fine-pebbled rubber than feels very good in the hands. These binos are not only equipped with nice twist-up rubber eyecups but also sliding rubber light/dew shields on the objective end. The latter aren't necessarily anything extraordiary; but a nice feature nonetheless. These binos also have the horizontal aluminum support bar and vertical tripod-mounting bar (w/ standard 1/4-20 threaded mount hole). Very handsome-looking instrument. The gold-colored logos/inscriptions add to this look; nothing gaudy or overstated.

FOV is given as 4.2 degrees. Not having the resources at hand (nor the time/patience in the freezing weather conditions) I could not verify this spec. I'm also not sure of this instrument's focal length/ratio. Taking a rough measurement with a tape measure it appears that the distance from the objectives to the oculars is right around 11 1/2 inches. Ocular glass diameter is approximately 7/8 inch.

Center focus/right-diopter assemblies function very smoothly, neither too tight or too loose - and no backlash with either. Eye relief is stated to be 18mm. I don't wear glasses; for me the viewing distance is perfect with the rubber eyecups fully extended.

The supplied spec sheet states that the coatings are MC, not FMC. I do not know if this is true. The glass of both the objectives and oculars display a nice green color with a faint hint of purple. Also, the other day I tried the face-reflection-in-objectives test and could not see any reflection of my face. I could barely see the profile of my head (I did use a medium-bright incandescent bulb [ceiling fixture] for this test, which may or may not have been adequate). Viewing a couple of close-by sodium-vapor streelights produced no noticeable flaring, ghosting, or multiple images.

---

Visual aspects: Considering the terrible light conditions and these binos' claimed 6.7mm exit pupil I must say that I was nonetheless impressed with their performance. Admittedly contrast was at an absolute minimum so I didn't much take it into account. What pleased me the most during this first test - and to me the single most important feature - was the quality of stellar images (this also produced a profound sense of relief after the unhappy experience I'd had a few weeks ago with a new pair of Zhumell 25x100s). Stars focused very sharp - and in both barrels/oculars. Though I forgot to check for coma/distortion at or near the edges of the field, I can say that I did not notice any (if it had been there to a sizeable degree I'm sure it would have caught my attention).
Stellar images were bright, but not overly so (considering the large exit pupil). Though no 1st- or 2nd-magnitude stars were visible at the time, I noticed no false colors or fringing from what stars I did view.

Collimation and barrel alignment appear to be perfect.

Center-focus/right diopter have more than adequate travel (no worries about running out before achieving focus).

I didn't have the opportunity (nor the skies) to view many objects, but what I did see was very pleasing. The Pleiades were sweet as usual, the entire group of stellar jewels very easily accommodated by the binos' generous FOV. Perseus - my favorite constellation - was a joy with its many stars of varying magnitudes and colors (colors were a bit weak owing, I believe, to the horrendous sky/light conditions). I could fit a large portion of the constellation in the FOV.

Everywhere I looked in the sky I saw stars in beautiful groups and arrangements. And M31 was, well, there but quite faint. Again, the skies were decidedly "hostile" to viewing any DSOs, even one as bright as the Andromeda Galaxy.

While the Vixens are basically light enough to hand-hold for short stretches, they - like most big binos - are at their best tripod-mounted. Though I had returned my big pair of Zhumells, I kept the Z. "heavy-duty" (for binos, anyway) tripod. Rated to handle the 10# weight of the 100s (which it did quite nicely), it's a beautiful piece and quite robust with smooth movement on all axes. On it the Vixens are rock solid (I almost want to call it a case of overkill).

Admittedly 12x isn't a lot. Still, for me binocular astronomy has largely been a general-sky-sweeping/viewing affair. I find this exceedingly rewarding and enjoyable - enough to where the inablity to locate/closely examine many DSOs isn't a major disappointment. For this I always used a telescope. I do not own one at the present time, but I imagine that this situation will change in the not-too-distant future. For the time being the more-than-adequate FOV and light grasp of the Vixens will do just fine. I am eagerly interested to see how they will perform under dark skies. I have a feeling that I will not be disappointed.

Mike Rapchak Jr.
Hammond, IN USA


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hallelujah
Post Laureate


Reged: 07/14/06
Posts: 3980
Loc: Colorado Rocky Mountains
Re: Short Test of Vixen Waterproof 12x80 BCF Binos new [Re: Mike Rapchak]
      #1291234 - 12/07/06 11:46 PM

Mike,

Thank you for an excellent review on your Vixen binoculars. I have been interested in the Vixen Giant ARK 30x80's for some time, but, have not heard any recent reviews.

I was wondering if you could clear something up for me. The Vixen 12x80's are designated as BCF & the 16x80, 20x80, and the 30x80 are designated as BWCF. Can you explain the letter designations. I am assuming that part of it stands for CF/Center Focus. Am I correct?

Also, I have seen them advertised on VixenAmerica.com as Giant ARK. Do you know what the ARK designation stands for?

Again, thanks for sharing your experiences & keep in touch.

--------------------
Nikon7x35GoldSentinel 9.3*(2)+Pentax8x40PCFWPII+MinoxBD10x44BP+FujinonFMTRSX7x50
Nikon10x50GoldSentinel+Pentax12x50 5.5*Japan+Pentax12x50PCFWPII+Vixen8x56Geoma
Fujinon12x60HB+Pentax16x60PCFWP+Pentax20x60PCFWP+Pentax20x60PCFWPII
Tento20x60USSR+Orion12x63MiniGiant+Spectrum I 20x65+Orion15x70LittleGiant II
Orion20x70LittleGiant II+Orion16x80Giant+Orion30x80MEGAView+Barska30x80X-Trail
BurgessOptical20x90SeriesII

Edited by hallelujah (12/07/06 11:47 PM)


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brocknroller
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 10/16/03
Posts: 1983
Loc: Bedford Falls, Pa.
Re: Short Test of Vixen Waterproof 12x80 BCF Binos new [Re: hallelujah]
      #1291345 - 12/08/06 01:32 AM

Mike,

Thanks for the review. No, 12x isn't a lot, but I've been amazed at the detail I can see in the night sky with my 12x50 SE.

I was curious about the ARKs, but they struck me as "star party binoculars." They would probably work splendidly under the 7 Mag skies at Cherry Springs State Park, but where I live or even at the short-drive darker sites I observe from, a 6.6mm exit pupil is overkill for my level of light pollution and my eyes (mild to moderate astigmatism and middle-aged entrance pupils).

The 6mm exit pupil of the CZJ 8x50 Octarem gives mediocre contrast under my skies, however, it shows the brightest images of stars and bright DSOs of any binocular I own even though its MC, not FMC. They would fully realize their potential at a dark site, but I use them for birding on dark, overcast days (no shortage of those in these parts!).

OTOH, my smaller aperture 8x32 SE shows more detail on the same DSOs due to better contrast. For example, looking at M 31, the Octarem shows a very bright hub but the fainter spiral arms are barely visible. With the 8x32 SE, I can easily see the hub and the spiral arms. With the 12x50 SE, I can see more extension and detail in the spiral arms, though Andromeda has to be high enough to avoid being devoured by the contrast Pac-Men that inhabit the light dome.

Using 7, 6, 5, 4, and 3mm exit pupil binoculars (from 7x50 to 20x60s), I found that 4mm hits the mark for my skies and eyes. 3mm gives even better background contrast, but at the expense of faint stars.

Even if you have 7mm entrance pupils, they are not going to open to 7mm under light polluted suburban skies, perhaps only 4mm, so your big binoculars may only be operating as 12x50s.

If you get the opportunity, compare the ARKs with a good quality FMC 12x50. You might find that when obseving near your home, you don't loose much by downsizing and may actually gain some detail due to the increased contrast. 12x50s are also easier to handhold and have a bit wider FOV.

If you get to a dark site, the 12x80s should produce amazing views, with both bright AND contrasty images. Be prepared for long lines at star parties! :-)

P.S. Interesting discussion of the exit pupil issue on this CN thread:
Exit Pupils

--------------------
Press: Are you a mod or a rocker?
Ringo: I'm a mocker


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KennyJ
The British Flash


Reged: 04/27/03
Posts: 20139
Loc: Lancashire UK
Re: Short Test of Vixen Waterproof 12x80 BCF Binos new [Re: brocknroller]
      #1291433 - 12/08/06 02:34 AM

Thanks for an interesting report , Mike !

I was also pleased to see Brock has woken from his latest snooze , too ! :-)

Regards , Kenny

--------------------


Milton Wilcox R.I.P






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brocknroller
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 10/16/03
Posts: 1983
Loc: Bedford Falls, Pa.
Re: Short Test of Vixen Waterproof 12x80 BCF Binos new [Re: KennyJ]
      #1292288 - 12/08/06 04:01 PM

Kenny,

Since our winter nights are blanketed in perpetual clouds and the colorful birds have abandoned the brush of my frost-bitten backyard for a warm chaise lounge and fruity Margarita in Capistrano, I decided to go into hibernation for the winter.

However, we had an unusually mild day, so I woke up and took my recently acquired 8x30 E2 out for a look-see and posted a message on CN. Now it's cold and snowy again so I will retreat back to my burrow.

Mike,

Before I retiring to my winter slumber, I wanted to share this article with you:
http://www.weatherman.com/binadler.htm

The author is Alan Adler (6.5mm entrance pupil). Search for the topic "Objective Diameter".

I hope you will post a follow-up when you get these babies under dark skies. Here's one place to do it, though I'm not sure how far it is from Hammond:
http://jmmahony.home.insightbb.com/pgo/starparty/

--------------------
Press: Are you a mod or a rocker?
Ringo: I'm a mocker


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Mark9473
Postmaster


Reged: 07/21/05
Posts: 6459
Loc: 51N 4E
Re: Short Test of Vixen Waterproof 12x80 BCF Binos new [Re: KennyJ]
      #1292294 - 12/08/06 04:06 PM

Thanks for the report, Mike. Sounds like the Vixens are pretty decent. When the Moon is back into view, I'd be interested to hear how they do with regard to flare and internal reflections. This would probably be the weak point of a binocular that's not FMC.

The Moon is also a good target to test for edge sharpness without going into precise double star measurements. Just wait for a near-Full Moon and put it right at the edge of view. Then estimate how much you have to move it towards the center to have the Moon appear in sharp focus. The lunar disk is a convenient half-degree yardstick.

To answer 'hallelujah's question: the W stands for wide-angle.

--------------------
Mark
Leica 8x20; Nikon 7x35; Vixen 8x42; Orion 15x63; Docter 15x60
WO Megrez II 80 FD / APM 107mm f/6.5 / Mewlon 210 on DM-6 + Berlebach Planet


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Mike Rapchak
professor emeritus


Reged: 11/17/06
Posts: 568
Loc: Indiana, USA
Re: Short Test of Vixen Waterproof 12x80 BCF Binos new [Re: hallelujah]
      #1292477 - 12/08/06 06:03 PM

Hallelujah,

You're very welcome; I'm glad you enjoyed the review.

You know, I've been wondering the same thing, i.e., what "ARK" stands for. I just e-mailed Vixen and asked them. As soon as I find out I'll let you know. Or perhaps some savvy bino person here will come up with the answer first.

Mike R.


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Mike Rapchak
professor emeritus


Reged: 11/17/06
Posts: 568
Loc: Indiana, USA
Re: Short Test of Vixen Waterproof 12x80 BCF Binos new [Re: brocknroller]
      #1292492 - 12/08/06 06:08 PM

Brock,

You're very welcome - I'm glad you liked the review.

I agree with you that dark skies are the best for this type of bino, and I appreciate your information on the differng views through your binos. I've never owned nor looked through a pair of 8x32s so I am pleasantly surprised to hear how well they perform considering their relatively small size.

Mike R.


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Mike Rapchak
professor emeritus


Reged: 11/17/06
Posts: 568
Loc: Indiana, USA
Re: Short Test of Vixen Waterproof 12x80 BCF Binos new [Re: KennyJ]
      #1292497 - 12/08/06 06:09 PM


You are most welcome, Kenny - I'm glad you liked it.

Mike R.


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Mike Rapchak
professor emeritus


Reged: 11/17/06
Posts: 568
Loc: Indiana, USA
Re: Short Test of Vixen Waterproof 12x80 BCF Binos new [Re: Mark9473]
      #1292508 - 12/08/06 06:14 PM

You're very welcome, Mark - I'm glad you liked the review. And thank you for the info on using the Moon as a test device. AFAIK at this time it's a couple days past full; it should be rising before too mucgh longer. I hope the sky stays clear. I was going to test the binos on it last night but was too tired (and I dreaded another trip outside into our current Arctic weather!).

Mike R.


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Erik D
Post Laureate


Reged: 04/28/03
Posts: 4066
Loc: Central New Jersey, USA
Re: Short Test of Vixen Waterproof 12x80 BCF Binos new [Re: brocknroller]
      #1292520 - 12/08/06 06:21 PM

Quote:


Using 7, 6, 5, 4, and 3mm exit pupil binoculars (from 7x50 to 20x60s), I found that 4mm hits the mark for my skies and eyes. 3mm gives even better background contrast, but at the expense of faint stars.






Brock,

I feel the same.

My current crop of a dozen+ binoculars range from 8X21 to 25X100. I have compared views with 7X50, 10X50, 12X50, 12X60, 20X80 and 25X100 for astronomy. I too, find that I prefer 4 mm exit pupil binos with my middle aged eyes and mag 4.5 backyard. I know I can still take advantage of 7 mm exit pupil because my 7X50 offers the brightest views for Night Time TERRESTRIAL viewing. However, 7X/7.1mm exit pupil is less than optium for me for Astro viewing. I can cover 10X10 degs of sky with my 7X50 EWA binocular but I see mostly gray, washout skies with few bright stars here and there and not much else...

My $350 12X50 Roofs with phase coating show slightly dimmer stars than my $109 Oberwerk 12X60s so quality of optics and better coating make a difference too.

Erik D


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hallelujah
Post Laureate


Reged: 07/14/06
Posts: 3980
Loc: Colorado Rocky Mountains
Re: Short Test of Vixen Waterproof 12x80 BCF Binos new [Re: Erik D]
      #1292731 - 12/08/06 08:49 PM

ARK has something to do with being able to withstand "long term moisture". That's all I was told

I think the person I was speaking with said his name was NOAH !

Edited by hallelujah (12/08/06 08:52 PM)


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Mike Rapchak
professor emeritus


Reged: 11/17/06
Posts: 568
Loc: Indiana, USA
Re: Short Test of Vixen Waterproof 12x80 BCF Binos new [Re: Mark9473]
      #1294361 - 12/09/06 11:11 PM

Mark (& All),

I was finally blessed with another clear sky here in NW Indiana which allowed me to do some tests as far as my Vixen 12x80s edge-of-field sharpness is concerned.

As I previously described, seeing conditions (light pollution, sky glow, etc.) in my hometown area leave much to be desired. Still in all, it's a clear night, and somewhat warmer than what we've recently experienced.

I first tried my Vixen binos on Aldebaran, the brightest accessible star. I seemed to notice a slight image degradation very near the edge of the FOV. I'm not sure how to calculate this percentage-wise, but I'd estimate it at 5% or so from the edge.

A while later I caught the Moon rising. It was still low over the horizon, a little over half-full. The termninator was nearly horizontal, which made for an easy test.

Not to exaggerate, but I saw no perceiveable distortion to the edge of the FOV. Nothing that anyone would notice (especially not at 12x). There may have been the tiniest bit of light drop-off, but not enough to notice unless one was looking for it (as in such a test as this).

Once again my conclusion regarding these binos is "Wow"! For the size and magnification they are beautiful. My standard by which I judge lower-powered binos is my "classic" pair of Celestron Nova 10x50 EWAs (1984 vintage; 8 degrees @ 1000 yds., etc). These binos are the most satisfying, comfortable-viewing (re the comments about older Japanese binos in the "Classic" thread) binoculars I've ever looked through and probably ever will. The Vixens come very close to this level. Other than the fact that they're not comfortably hand-holdable and that their eye relief is almost excessive, their views are closer to the Celestrons than any other low-powered bino I've tried; i.e., VERY satisfying, with images considerably bigger and brighter than those presented by the Celestron pair.

Mike R.


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Mark9473
Postmaster


Reged: 07/21/05
Posts: 6459
Loc: 51N 4E
Re: Short Test of Vixen Waterproof 12x80 BCF Binos new [Re: Mike Rapchak]
      #1294656 - 12/10/06 07:13 AM

that sounds like an impressive performance, Mike! Thanks for reporting on those tests.

--------------------
Mark
Leica 8x20; Nikon 7x35; Vixen 8x42; Orion 15x63; Docter 15x60
WO Megrez II 80 FD / APM 107mm f/6.5 / Mewlon 210 on DM-6 + Berlebach Planet


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Mike Rapchak
professor emeritus


Reged: 11/17/06
Posts: 568
Loc: Indiana, USA
Re: Short Test of Vixen Waterproof 12x80 BCF Binos new [Re: Mark9473]
      #1295089 - 12/10/06 12:55 PM

Mark,

You're most welcome. By now some may wonder if I work for Vixen since my reports on these binoculars are so positive. Be assured that I have no connections with the company whatsoever.

A couple of addendums: I viewed a close-by sodium-vapor street light once more and was again struck by the binos' lack of ghosting-flaring. The image has very nice contrast and isn't overly bright. I'm beginning to wonder if the coatings may be a bit overdone, a tad too heavy/thick? Also - and this struck me later on after my testing was finished for the night - I viewed the moon one more time when it was considerably higher in the sky (perhaps 50 degrees) than during the first test; it was by this time "smaller" and considerably brighter. Not only was there no ghosting/flaring, but the image resolution of surface details was simply exquisite. Again, 12x isn't a lot, but the detail seen on craters, etc., was beautiful.

My conclusion: this is a very fine pair of binoculars, both physically and visually.


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Robert A.
sage


Reged: 01/21/05
Posts: 433
Loc: Milwaukee, WI Northern USA
Re: Short Test of Vixen Waterproof 12x80 BCF Binos new [Re: Mike Rapchak]
      #1296436 - 12/11/06 05:30 AM

I challenge you to get or borrow a good 12x60 binocular. The two I am thinking of is either the 12x63 Orion Little Giant or the Nikon Superior E 12x50. --Or even the Oberwerk 12x60. First, you will enjoy the 12x size, that you already use. Now it is hand holdable or almost hand holdable. Then you can test how much the 80mm adds to your binocular weekly use.

I received some of this truth in-the-pudding when I enjoyed the Oberwerk 11x56 for weeks on end. Then one weekend I used a Swift 11x80. It shook me on how similar the views were. (I'm in my 40's)

Since you live in Indiana, maybe you have a darker sky than I. I live in the city, and have not traveled more than 30 minutes to do my star gazing. How far do you travel to do your astronomy? Once on a trip through Indiana, I stopped at an exit from the highway. It was mostly a dark exit. I suspect I saw the North American Nebula that one time. My eyes are not educated on what to expect, so I am not sure I was seeing it in actuality. I was using a 15x70 barska that was my first 'giant' binocular. I have since given that one away to a brother who is more of an astronomer than I.

--------------------
Oberwerk 11x56, Nikon 12x50se, Fujinon 16x70, William Optics 22x70, Oberwerk 25/40 45degree 100mm


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EdZ
Professor EdZ


Reged: 02/15/02
Posts: 18806
Loc: Cumberland, R I , USA42N71.4W
Re: Short Test of Vixen Waterproof 12x80 BCF Binos new [Re: Mike Rapchak]
      #1296479 - 12/11/06 06:27 AM

Quote:

Mark (& All),

I was finally blessed with another clear sky here in NW Indiana which allowed me to do some tests as far as my Vixen 12x80s edge-of-field sharpness is concerned.

As I previously described, seeing conditions (light pollution, sky glow, etc.) in my hometown area leave much to be desired. Still in all, it's a clear night, and somewhat warmer than what we've recently experienced.

I first tried my Vixen binos on Aldebaran, the brightest accessible star. I seemed to notice a slight image degradation very near the edge of the FOV. I'm not sure how to calculate this percentage-wise, but I'd estimate it at 5% or so from the edge.

A while later I caught the Moon rising. It was still low over the horizon, a little over half-full. The termninator was nearly horizontal, which made for an easy test.

Not to exaggerate, but I saw no perceiveable distortion to the edge of the FOV. Nothing that anyone would notice (especially not at 12x). There may have been the tiniest bit of light drop-off, but not enough to notice unless one was looking for it (as in such a test as this).

Once again my conclusion regarding these binos is "Wow"! For the size and magnification they are beautiful. My standard by which I judge lower-powered binos is my "classic" pair of Celestron Nova 10x50 EWAs (1984 vintage; 8 degrees @ 1000 yds., etc). These binos are the most satisfying, comfortable-viewing (re the comments about older Japanese binos in the "Classic" thread) binoculars I've ever looked through and probably ever will. The Vixens come very close to this level. Other than the fact that they're not comfortably hand-holdable and that their eye relief is almost excessive, their views are closer to the Celestrons than any other low-powered bino I've tried; i.e., VERY satisfying, with images considerably bigger and brighter than those presented by the Celestron pair.

Mike R.




I guess I would just say that impressions can vary considerably from reality. Now by that I don't mean that you are not seeing good optical performance, but I do mean that a method of measuring and reporting that performance may provide a different perception of that same performance.

Some examples:
Light drop off. On most observed field stars it would never be seen. It must be measured by observing stars at the limits of the instrument light gaathering capabilities. I've never found a binocular that didn't lose about a half magnitude in the outer field. Most common binoculars that distort about 60-70% out lose nearly a full magnitude in the outer filed. For your size binocular, you would need to observe stars between mag 10-11.

Outer field sharpness. A binocular that shows little to no aberrations out to within 5% of the field edge would be rated as one of the top binoculars (as to edge sharpness) on the market today. With the exception of using premium eyepieces such as radians or UO orthos in the BT100, I've never seen a binocular that exhibited no aberrations out to within 5% of the field stop. You can measure the placement of any stars in your field by placing another known star on the field edge, noting the performance and later use charts to measure the proportional distance to where you measured the performancce.

edz

--------------------
Teach a kid something today. The feeling you'll get is one of life's greatest rewards.
member#21


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Mark9473
Postmaster


Reged: 07/21/05
Posts: 6459
Loc: 51N 4E
Re: Short Test of Vixen Waterproof 12x80 BCF Binos [Re: EdZ]
      #1297046 - 12/11/06 01:27 PM

I agree with you on both points, EdZ, but on the edge sharpness if the Moon appears 'sharp' that's good enough for me. But I do know that the 'measured' apparent resolution may well be up to a few hundred arcseconds even then.

Could I ask that you consider adding this thread to the mini-reviews? There's not that much information on the Vixen ARK existing.

--------------------
Mark
Leica 8x20; Nikon 7x35; Vixen 8x42; Orion 15x63; Docter 15x60
WO Megrez II 80 FD / APM 107mm f/6.5 / Mewlon 210 on DM-6 + Berlebach Planet


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Mike Rapchak
professor emeritus


Reged: 11/17/06
Posts: 568
Loc: Indiana, USA
Re: Short Test of Vixen Waterproof 12x80 BCF Binos new [Re: EdZ]
      #1297455 - 12/11/06 04:58 PM

Ed,

Ahh, I see what you mean by light dropoff. I wasn't aware that that's the way to test for it. I thought that a bright object like the Moon (or as in my case Aldebaran) would be a good object. So yes, it appears that I used a different method wherein I first put Ald. in the center of the FOV, then gradually moved it to the outer edge. I noticed a bit of dropoff at the edge, but it wasn't noticeable unless I was looking for it. Nor did I notice any real distortion of the image. What I saw was minor and only occurred when the star was very close to the edge of the field. It may have been a wee bit more than 5%, but I don't think it was much more.

Of course it's cloudy here again; otherwise I'd do another test tonight. As soon as it clears up I'll get to it.

Mike R.


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Mike Rapchak
professor emeritus


Reged: 11/17/06
Posts: 568
Loc: Indiana, USA
Re: Short Test of Vixen Waterproof 12x80 BCF Binos new [Re: hallelujah]
      #1297850 - 12/11/06 08:11 PM

Halelujah,

I finally heard from a fellow at Vixen Optics named Mike Fowler. He said that the word "ARK" implies "Giant" or Big" (as in Noah's...?).

Mike R.


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