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Observing >> Deep Sky Observing

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Sarkikos
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Reged: 12/18/07

Loc: Nyctophobia, Maryland, USA
Re: Why do galaxies and globs have diff magnitude diff new [Re: Tony Flanders]
      #5756091 - 03/25/13 12:30 PM

Tony,

Quote:

Like M33, the visibility of NGC 6822 depends a lot more on sky darkness than on aperture.




In my experience, M33 is not so difficult. I've seen it several times through 10x50mm binos at home in a red zone. At my yellow zone site, unless it is in the western haze for a Messier Marathon, M33 is easy. I think NGC 6822 must be appreciably more difficult. But I'll take your advice and give it another try this summer.

Mike


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Tony Flanders
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Reged: 05/18/06

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Re: Why do galaxies and globs have diff magnitude diff new [Re: Sarkikos]
      #5756282 - 03/25/13 02:20 PM

Quote:

In my experience, M33 is not so difficult ... I think NGC 6822 must be appreciably more difficult.




Oh yes, M33 is a piece of cake compared to NGC 6822.

My point was simply that since they're both quite large and diffuse, with no highly concentrated centers, their visibility is limited almost entirely by their surface brightness rather than by their absolute brightness.

M33 is indeed fairly easy for an experienced observer to spot with 7x35 binoculars from the red zone -- and not a whole lot easier through an 8-inch telescope.

Likewise, NGC 6822 is fairly easy for an experienced observer to spot with 15x70 binoculars from a black zone -- and not a whole lot easier through an 8-inch telescope. But it's totally out of the question from the red zone.


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Sarkikos
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Reged: 12/18/07

Loc: Nyctophobia, Maryland, USA
Re: Why do galaxies and globs have diff magnitude diff new [Re: Tony Flanders]
      #5756293 - 03/25/13 02:28 PM

Yes, I would not even try for NGC 6822 here in a red zone. Somethings are not worth the time and effort. On the other hand, IMO, all blue/gray/black zones are way too far away for me to travel to unless I plan on spending several days there. Not gonna happen'. But since you have seen NGC 6822 in a yellow zone, it is worth the effort for me at my usual dark site.

Mike


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Bill Barlow
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Reged: 12/03/07

Loc: Overland Park KS
Re: Why do galaxies and globs have diff magnitude diff new [Re: deepskydarrell]
      #5757176 - 03/25/13 10:49 PM

This is one galaxy that I have been trying to observe for a few years now, but with no success. I have viewed the Little Gem nebula many times, but never Barnards galaxy..at least I don't think I have. Does it show just a more densely packed group of stars? Is there any nebuloscity? I have used scopes up to a Meade 12 and C14 in a yellow zone. I don't have goto, as I star-hop to my targets. Thanks..

Bill


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deepskydarrell
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Reged: 03/09/08

Loc: Abbotsford, BC Canada
Re: Why do galaxies and globs have diff magnitude diff new [Re: Bill Barlow]
      #5757407 - 03/26/13 02:11 AM

Quote:

This is one galaxy that I have been trying to observe for a few years now, but with no success. I have viewed the Little Gem nebula many times, but never Barnards galaxy..at least I don't think I have. Does it show just a more densely packed group of stars? Is there any nebuloscity? I have used scopes up to a Meade 12 and C14 in a yellow zone. I don't have goto, as I star-hop to my targets. Thanks..

Bill




Bill, it's usually just a drift by kind of thing. No real stars but a glow that at first is noticed on the move and on better nights can be recognized when still. I get it with my lowest powers: 63X and 70X. At 15.5' by 13.5' it's a good size. Once I got the emission neb IC 1308 as a brighter patch NNE of its centre.

There are quite a few field stars since it's only about 20° from the galactic equator and that can make the hop messy. Perhaps a deep print out would help navigate that. Sometimes not knowing exactly where it is helps me confirm that I've really seen it --- if that makes any sense.

Your latitude is 11° farther south of my dark sky site so it should be that much higher in your sky and that should help. My 16.5 inch optics were only fair+ so a 14" or 12" should catch it eventually. I have gotten it with my old 8" but darkness could be the true key? I waited 3 or so years for the perfect conditions for finally getting the Draco dwarf -- in that instance transparency was very important.

Hope you can get it this summer.

Darrell.


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Starman1
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Reged: 06/24/03

Loc: Los Angeles
Re: Why do galaxies and globs have diff magnitude diff new [Re: deepskydarrell]
      #5767124 - 03/30/13 04:28 PM

Well, 5053 is fairly large (>10') as well as having individual stars quite dim (horizontal branch is magnitude 16.7). It's actually a little easier to see stars in this one than in M14 (horizontal branch average = 17.1), but it's just not as dense.

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