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Observing >> Deep Sky Observing

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hokkaido53
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Reged: 05/07/12

Loc: New Mexico
Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053?
      #5856056 - 05/12/13 06:28 PM

This 9th-magnitude globular cluster is located about a degree from another glob, M53 in Coma Berenices. I tried twice this month to see it, using an 18" Obsession reflector, but the object remained elusive. This was strange since I was able to see galaxies at 12th, 13th and 14th magnitude. From what I've read this object is always difficult to see , and my local skies are rather hazy this time of year.

I would like to hear from some of observers who have had successful viewings of this object.

Thanks,

Roy in Maryland


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kfiscus
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Reged: 07/09/12

Loc: Albert Lea, MN, USA
Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: hokkaido53]
      #5856137 - 05/12/13 07:07 PM

Saw it in my Z12. It's ghostly. The contrast between the two is very attractive.

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star drop
contra contrail
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Reged: 02/02/08

Loc: Snow Plop, WNY
Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: kfiscus]
      #5856205 - 05/12/13 07:49 PM

Twenty four years ago I saw it from a red/white light pollution zone in a 25" telescope at 98.5x magnification. It was indeed ghostly, a few isolated stars with a slight haze behind them. Last week I revisited it from a green zone at 121x magnification and it was better but still not an awe inspiring object. I saw around fifteen to twenty stars this time (difficult to count due to poor seeing). Its brightest stars are around fourteenth magnitude but there are only perhaps a total of two dozen members brighter than eighteenth magnitude.
Link to a color magnitude diagram and information about NGC 5053.


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Tony Flanders
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: hokkaido53]
      #5856266 - 05/12/13 08:26 PM

Yes, 5053 is one of my favorite globulars, a real beauty.

It has very low surface brightness, especially compared to nearby M53, so it requires fairly dark skies.

It's visible as a faint haze in pretty small instruments -- I've seen it in 15x70 binoculars, and it's fairly easy in my 70-mm refractor at 60X -- again assuming reasonably dark skies.

It resolves pretty well into individual stars at 227X in my 12.5-inch Dob.


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SteelStar
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: star drop]
      #5856273 - 05/12/13 08:30 PM

I've tried several times over the years to see NGC5053 with my 6" refractor in my 4.5 mag skies without success.

I have managed to see it with my 12"Dob but it was a very marginal observation and near the limit at what I would call detectable. It was definitely "there" but very faint and not very impressive.

It is however one of those objects I always try to see every year because it is difficult. As long as I can continue to at least tell it is there I know my skies are not getting any worse.


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Greatshot
sage


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Loc: Norton, MA
Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: SteelStar]
      #5856652 - 05/13/13 12:17 AM

I went looking for this one myself a week or so ago during my one week of awesomely dark and clear skies we've had this year around here.

I was very perplexed myself as to why I couldn't find it in my 8". I was pulling in galaxies in the Virgo and Coma clusters no problem, including a few I had never seen at all before from my LP'd yard, and the listed magnitude of this one seemed certainly doable, but I searched all over the area and just came up empty. I'm reassured to hear that it's just one of those strangely difficult to see objects, but it's proven to be the hardest glob for me yet, and I was even able to track down NGC 2419 a few years back in the same conditions. Might have to give it another crack if I can before the season ends if I get a good night for it.

Edited by Greatshot (05/13/13 12:18 AM)


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GlennLeDrew
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Greatshot]
      #5856665 - 05/13/13 12:29 AM

I see it as a hazy glow without difficulty in my home-made 20.8X60 bino under a dark sky.

What's interesting here is that this and M53 are at essentially the same distance, thus forming a kind of 'double cluster.' But it's my supposition that this is almost certainly a coincidence; their galactic orbits must differ, with the two currently passing like ships in the night. (Unless a study I've not come across shows evidence of their being related, which would be fascinating!)


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FJA
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: GlennLeDrew]
      #5856875 - 05/13/13 06:24 AM

I observed NGC 5053 last May, during an evening of mediocre to good transparency, using my 18" at 132x.
It was"...faint, very faint and amounted to nothing more than a roundish glow with stellarings in moments of good seeing and no central condensation." Anything less than good transparency renders it invisible, as the previous evening I couldn't find it at all and the following evening I had to wait until the transparency improved.


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Tony Flanders
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Greatshot]
      #5856995 - 05/13/13 08:47 AM

Quote:

I was very perplexed myself as to why I couldn't find it in my 8".




Light pollution.

NGC 5053 isn't as tough as (say) Barnard's Galaxy (NGC 6822), much less a seriously low-surface brightness galaxy like IC 1613. But it's orders of magnitude harder than your average NGC galaxy.

Quote:

I was even able to track down NGC 2419 a few years back in the same conditions.




NGC 2419 is not especially challenging. I recorded it as "an obvious fuzzy patch with averted vision" through my 7-inch Dob at my astronomy club's suburban observing field, roughly magnitude 20.0 per square arcsecond. I have several times tried and failed to find NGC 5053 through the same instrument at the same site.

But it shouldn't be hard at magnitude 21.0 per square arcsecond. That's nowhere near truly dark, but it's pretty different from any normal suburb.


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C_Moon
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Tony Flanders]
      #5857051 - 05/13/13 09:20 AM

I was able to see (detect) N5053 last week. I was happy I could see it, but it was a bit too faint for me to call it aesthetically pleasing or to say that it had an impressive contrast with M53. Maybe I need to bump up a bit in aperture or gain more experience.

I find the open cluster in Lyra (N 6791) to be similar in this regard.


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Bill Boublitz
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Reged: 05/04/13

Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: hokkaido53]
      #5857094 - 05/13/13 09:53 AM

Roy, I have one logged observation; 2004:03:28:05:00 UT with a 4" refractor. The naked eye limit was 5.0. Coma Berenices was right on or very near the meridian. I was really observing M53 but noted; "Detect mystery object at 10 o'clock - a faint fugitive smudge." I have a crude field of view sketch and it matches 5053's location exactly.

I have logged observations of M53 in 2004, 2005 with no mention of 5053. May, 2007 I logged M53 under mag.5.5 with averted vision skies, went specifically looking for NGC 5053 and failed to see it.

Next opportunity, I will focus my 7" on it and give it a go.

Not much, but thought I'd pass it along as we're neighbors (as planets go).


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operascope
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Reged: 09/03/08

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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Bill Boublitz]
      #5857131 - 05/13/13 10:09 AM

I was looking for N5053 just last Thursday night, under very nice dark skies, and I couldn't find it. However, I didn't know how dim it really is, so I'd really like another crack at it. Now that I know what to look for, I expect I'll have more success.

N 6791, mentioned by C Moon, is another one that I've had difficulty finding, and look forward to bagging it this coming summer, once again armed with the knowledge of this group.


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ensign
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Reged: 12/16/08

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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: operascope]
      #5857147 - 05/13/13 10:21 AM

Saw it a few years ago under clear, dark skies with a 10" Dob. A friend brought a detailed finder chart. Positioning the scope exactly where it was supposed to be helped a great deal.

The cluster seemed to resolve into individual stars just at the threshold of visibility, winking into and out of view.


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Astrojensen
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: ensign]
      #5857484 - 05/13/13 01:08 PM

I've seen NGC 5053 in my 63mm Zeiss Telemator a few times. The sky must be clear and dark or it's a no show. I've also observed NGC 6791 several times in this scope and find the latter considerably easier.


Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark


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LivingNDixie
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Astrojensen]
      #5857735 - 05/13/13 03:17 PM

Saw it back in 2012. Not overly hard, just need transparent skies. It is one of the challenge objects for the Astro League Globular Star Cluster pin AND is a Herschel 2 list object. So no it is not going to be an easy object.

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rogerandgarf
sage
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Loc: Arlington, Wa
Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: hokkaido53]
      #5857749 - 05/13/13 03:21 PM

Was out last week cruising for spring-season galaxies, transparency was average, could have been a bit better, but the view of globular clusters was undiminished, so stopped in to see N5053, nicely resolved in the 18 inch dob. Is actually a very nice cluster, definitely worth your time if you have the aperture to do it justice.

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Astrojensen
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: LivingNDixie]
      #5857833 - 05/13/13 04:02 PM

Quote:

is a Herschel 2 list object




Really? I thought I recalled it being a H400 object. It's surely not THAT more difficult than so many H400 objects. Actually, there are several H400 objects that I've found to be considerably harder. Then again, the H400 was never meant to be a list of the 400 easiest Herschel objects.

Anyway, NGC 5053 is on my personal list of interesting objects that I visit every now and then, just to see if I can see them (mostly with the Zeiss Telemator).


Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark


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hokkaido53
sage


Reged: 05/07/12

Loc: New Mexico
Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: operascope]
      #5857918 - 05/13/13 04:53 PM

Well,the seeing wasn't too good that night, due to haze from the Susquehanna. The cluster was about 45 degrees in the eastern sky, so I'll try again when it's near the zenith.

Roy


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Achernar
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: hokkaido53]
      #5858111 - 05/13/13 05:47 PM

I've seen it once, it is very ghostly and hard to make out through haze and skyglow even when I bring my 15-inch to bear on it. When skies are good you certainly can see it just fine with an 8 or 10-inch, but when skies are bad it's no joy even with a much bigger telescope.

Taras


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KidOrion
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Reged: 07/07/07

Loc: Carbondale, IL
Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Achernar]
      #5858773 - 05/13/13 10:34 PM

Have tried several times with a 12.5". No reward yet.

Which is worse, 5053 or 7492? I've actually seen the latter.

Edited by KidOrion (05/13/13 10:36 PM)


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Dave MitskyModerator
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: KidOrion]
      #5859150 - 05/14/13 04:53 AM

NGC 5053 can be rather difficult from under less-than-pristine skies. I had a fairly good view of it, relatively speaking, most recently at the Texas Star Party last week through my 15" f/4.5 TT/Classic Dob.

NGC 5053 is on the Herschel II list.

Dave Mitsky


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aatt
sage


Reged: 07/26/12

Loc: CT
Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Dave Mitsky]
      #5859946 - 05/14/13 01:36 PM

I am still trying for this-I posted earlier this year hoping for some tips.I feel your pain. It just won't show itself. I need a dark site! Clearly my orange zone is not working in spite of having a 15".

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GlennLeDrew
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: aatt]
      #5861085 - 05/14/13 10:18 PM

If the aperture is insufficient to resolve its brighter members, then the sky must be pretty dark. NGC 5053 is not difficult in my 20.8X60 binos, and it is of lower surface brightness than open cluster NGC 6791 (the latter of which I've glimpsed in 7X35 binos on one awesome night.)

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Feidb
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 10/09/09

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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: GlennLeDrew]
      #5861135 - 05/14/13 10:36 PM

I saw it on July 10, 2004 from the Lee Canyon Weather Station on the back road to Mt. Charleston near Las Vegas at an altitude of 6,500 feet. There was a light breeze but no clouds with a haze in the valley below that led to Indian Springs.

The cluster was extremely faint but I saw it as almost as large as M-53. I used my home-built 16-inch f/6.4 at 70X. As for individual stars, I described a faint milky glow which usually means I didn't notice any.


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David Knisely
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Astrojensen]
      #5861398 - 05/15/13 02:24 AM

Quote:

Quote:

is a Herschel 2 list object




Really? I thought I recalled it being a H400 object. It's surely not THAT more difficult than so many H400 objects. Actually, there are several H400 objects that I've found to be considerably harder. Then again, the H400 was never meant to be a list of the 400 easiest Herschel objects.

Anyway, NGC 5053 is on my personal list of interesting objects that I visit every now and then, just to see if I can see them (mostly with the Zeiss Telemator).


Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark




Nope, it is indeed a Herschel II object. In my 10 inch under fairly dark skies, it starts to resolve, showing perhaps 20 to 25 very faint stars in a faint hazy glow (141x). In my 14 inch, that number goes up to around 40 faint stars, but the cluster still isn't all that well resolved. Clear skies to you.


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Sarkikos
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: hokkaido53]
      #5861557 - 05/15/13 07:11 AM

Hi Roy,

I've seen NGC 5053 through my 10" f/4.8 Dob. This was at a yellow zone site on the Eastern Shore of Maryland.

5053 is about a degree se of M53. They can both be seen in the same field at low power. 5053 is pretty faint and large, has low surface brightness. It is an H400 II object and is also on Don Pensack's list of Best DSO.

Mike


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hokkaido53
sage


Reged: 05/07/12

Loc: New Mexico
Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Sarkikos]
      #5862035 - 05/15/13 12:14 PM

Quote:

Hi Roy,

I've seen NGC 5053 through my 10" f/4.8 Dob. This was at a yellow zone site on the Eastern Shore of Maryland.

5053 is about a degree se of M53. They can both be seen in the same field at low power. 5053 is pretty faint and large, has low surface brightness. It is a H400 II object and is also on Don Pensack's list of Best DSO.

Mike




Yellow? Well, the best we can do in Harford County is orange, thanks to I-95 and six dozen car dealers. The good news is: I'm moving to New Mexico in July.


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Achernar
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: KidOrion]
      #5862126 - 05/15/13 12:57 PM

NGC-5053 is easy compared to NGC-7492 in Aquarius. That one was a very dim, featureless blob through my 10-inch. At that, the only place I was able to see it at all was from the Conecuh National Forest during a very clear night. I doubt the view would improve much unless you bring a 30-inch or larger telescope to bear on it, it is very remote at 86,000 light years from the Sun and intrinsically faint too. An absolute magnitude of -6 is faint for a globular, where an average globular has a luminosity of 100,000 suns or more. That means an absolute magnitude of at least -8 if not -9 or -10 for the most luminous examples. It's apparent magnitude is 11.5, which is why it's so hard to see in telesopes. If you want a challenge object for the fall, this globular certainly would be a challenge for a 10 or 12-inch telescope.

Taras


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Sarkikos
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: hokkaido53]
      #5862207 - 05/15/13 01:23 PM

Quote:

Yellow? Well, the best we can do in Harford County is orange, thanks to I-95 and six dozen car dealers. The good news is: I'm moving to New Mexico in July.




My home site is in a red zone. I have to drive an hour to get to the yellow zone. New Mexico sounds much better.

Mike


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Sarkikos
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Achernar]
      #5862214 - 05/15/13 01:25 PM

Quote:

NGC-5053 is easy compared to NGC-7492 in Aquarius. That one was a very dim, featureless blob through my 10-inch.




NGC 7492 is in my spreadsheet, but I haven't seen it yet. I'll have to give it a try later this year.

Mike


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Greatshot
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Tony Flanders]
      #5862980 - 05/15/13 07:35 PM

Quote:

Quote:

I was very perplexed myself as to why I couldn't find it in my 8".




Light pollution.

NGC 5053 isn't as tough as (say) Barnard's Galaxy (NGC 6822), much less a seriously low-surface brightness galaxy like IC 1613. But it's orders of magnitude harder than your average NGC galaxy.

Quote:

I was even able to track down NGC 2419 a few years back in the same conditions.




NGC 2419 is not especially challenging. I recorded it as "an obvious fuzzy patch with averted vision" through my 7-inch Dob at my astronomy club's suburban observing field, roughly magnitude 20.0 per square arcsecond. I have several times tried and failed to find NGC 5053 through the same instrument at the same site.

But it shouldn't be hard at magnitude 21.0 per square arcsecond. That's nowhere near truly dark, but it's pretty different from any normal suburb.




That makes sense. I still have a hard time making sense of surface brightnesses and all of that - partly because the math/terminology is a little confusing to me and partially because I just don't see a consistent "metric" for it (some 13 SB objects seem brighter than others, for example, at least in my settings). I had figured where globs are more or less stellar objects that magnitude would be accurate for them, and a 9 seemed doable especially since the Wanderer is so much further away and really wasn't that hard to see once I found the spot to look in. Ah well, lesson learned.


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GlennLeDrew
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Greatshot]
      #5864716 - 05/16/13 02:20 PM

NGC 5053's *central* surface brightness is 22 magnitudes per square arcsecond (MPSAS), fading radially from there. The darkest skies are at 22 MPSAS, which when added to the glob's core brightness would have said core appearing twice as bright as the sky, or 21.25 MPSAS. This is reasonably good contrast, actually.

This is why under a reasonably dark sky a small instrument can paradoxically render better visibility than a moderately large one does. If the scope cannot resolve member stars in any number, the spread out glow which fills a not tiny pirtion of the FOV can be more difficult to discern than when seen as more compact in a smaller instrument. And if the exit pupil is not on the large side, the overall dimming results in more visual system noise to overcome.

In short, this relatively sizeable object does not require very high magnification to detect as a glow. Under dark skies it's not difficult in small scopes. But above some level of sky glow (about 20-20.5 MPSAS?), it requires an aperture sufficient to resolve at least some dozen or more stars to realize this cluster is there.


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Bernie Poskus
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: KidOrion]
      #5868556 - 05/18/13 12:30 AM

I first got interested in NGC 5053 after reading about it in Walter Scott Houston's book "Deep Sky Wonders" (he was a predecessor to Sue French, and wrote the deep sky observing column in "Sky & Telescope" Magazine) on page 136. I was at my very first star party and read his description of it as "... a little gem of woven fairy fire." We tried to find it after I pointed it out to the folks I was with, and to our frustration, we were unable to find it. That made it one of my "Moby Dick" objects, i.e., something I was always trying to find and observe.

Since then, I've observed it on a number of occasions in my 16" dob. Not on every occasion, but sometimes I can see what Houston was talking about. In good conditions, and with a scope of reasonable aperture (Houston's description applies to when you are using "... large instruments ..."), I have observed an extremely faint haze, with a few stars here and there resolvable, which gives it almost a tiara like ambiance. It will not grab you like eye candy does, but it has a subtle beauty.

It is worth searching out and observing, but don't get frustrated if you can't see it. Try again some other night, which is what I did.


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youngamateur42
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: SteelStar]
      #5876515 - 05/21/13 05:57 PM

found in a 6 inch f-4.7 from mag 4.5 or less skies in my backyard with great difficulty. Got eyes

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Darren Drake
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: youngamateur42]
      #5901901 - 06/04/13 02:14 PM

I bagged this one for the first time last night. It was so much more difficult than I thought it would be in my 18 inch. It seems to be one of the loosest globs I've seen somewhat like M71. Wanna try again under better seeing conditions.

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kfiscus
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? *DELETED* new [Re: Darren Drake]
      #5902170 - 06/04/13 04:47 PM

Post deleted by kfiscus

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nytecam
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: kfiscus]
      #5902316 - 06/04/13 06:01 PM

My shot of NGC 5053 from last April showed a sparce object for a globular but worthy challenge

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GlennLeDrew
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: nytecam]
      #5902351 - 06/04/13 06:23 PM

Darren,
Somewhat like M71? The latter has *very* much higher surface brightness, being more concentrated. A more similar globular is NGC 5897 in Libra, but that one's still easier than NGC 5053.


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Astrojensen
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: GlennLeDrew]
      #5903197 - 06/05/13 03:39 AM

NGC 5053 is much more like the Palomar globulars than most other globulars in the NGC. Almost a transition case.


Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark


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Darren Drake
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Astrojensen]
      #5903517 - 06/05/13 09:59 AM

I was thinking more along the way of how loose the 2 clusters appear and could somewhat be confused as open clusters instead of globulars...

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SebJ
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Darren Drake]
      #5904251 - 06/05/13 04:14 PM

Spotted NGC5053 a couple of years back. Immensely difficult to define in my 16". As already mentioned, visually it's not what you'd call a classic glob. I actually found it easier to pull out a sparse pocket of individual stars than much of a background glow. Much more difficult to see than I thought it would be.

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Fuzzyguy
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Darren Drake]
      #5905212 - 06/06/13 03:24 AM

I bagged this one tonight in my C8 from a darker green zone. It took over an hour to confirm it and I pulled out the hood, eye patch and a lot of time just sitting with my eyes closed, taking deep breaths. After about an hour, I could definitely see a very slight brightening in the background between a couple of 10th-11th mag stars using the ES6820 and averted vision. I put in the ES6816 and the cluster was very hard to see, but 3 or 4 very faint stars popped in and out. I don't know if they were field stars or associated with the cluster, but they were sort of blinking in the same spot each time.

This was definitely one of the most difficult objects I've actually succeeded in finding. No "wow" factor, but a nice feeling of accomplishment. I wish the OP patience and good luck finding this one. It's worth it! I wouldn't have had a snow ball's chance to find this one a year ago.


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KidOrion
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Darren Drake]
      #5910761 - 06/09/13 01:44 AM

Went out with five targets in mind (4147, 5053, 5466, Hickson 61 [The Box], and 5897) this evening. Get the scope set up and collimated well; as soon as stars start becoming visible, it clouds over for two hours. Pack the scope up to return home, and the southern horizon clears. Grumble, grumble. (Of course, by the time I get home, it's completely clouded over again.)

The way things are going here, NGC 5053 is going to have to wait for next year.


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Astrojensen
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: KidOrion]
      #5910845 - 06/09/13 03:53 AM

Quote:

I used to be an amateur astronomer, until I took a Nagler to the knee.




You are my hero.


Clear skies!
Thomas, Denmark


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Starman1
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: hokkaido53]
      #5919352 - 06/13/13 07:07 PM

Quote:

This 9th-magnitude globular cluster is located about a degree from another glob, M53 in Coma Berenices. I tried twice this month to see it, using an 18" Obsession reflector, but the object remained elusive. This was strange since I was able to see galaxies at 12th, 13th and 14th magnitude. From what I've read this object is always difficult to see , and my local skies are rather hazy this time of year.

I would like to hear from some of observers who have had successful viewings of this object.

Thanks,

Roy in Maryland




First saw this in 1984 with a 4" SCT. No notes other than "seen".
Spotted again in '86 with a 6" newt, then in an 8" SCT in 1995:
lrg, no condensation, v.faint stars, only few *'s resolved,mostly diffuse glow,core lrg % of vis.cl.,round, lots of faint *'s
Since then I view it every time I'm near it. With the 12.5":
Large, loose, faint stars, fully resolved but with some background glow, no obvious concentration, appears to be 2 quanta of magnitudes.

The horizontal branch of this cluster is at magnitude 16.65 with the brightest stars around 13.8, so it should be easy for a 6" to see a few stars and for a 12" or larger to resolve the fainter ones in dark skies.
M14 is fainter, with a horizontal branch of magnitude 17.1 and brightest stars of 14.0 yet I hear of that being found with a 60mm scope.

If you can't see it in an 18", then chances are either that your sky is too bright, or you're looking for something smaller. NGC5053 is 10' across, about 1/3 the width of the full moon, and similar to M13 in size.


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hokkaido53
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Starman1]
      #6435498 - 03/29/14 02:21 AM

OK! I finally saw this globular tonight, from Taos, NM. The sky was a little hazy, but I viewed it around 10:30pm with my 18" Obsession , at a magnification of 170x. It first appeared as a fuzzy mass, but then the brighter stars began to stand out, with the help of averted vision.

Roy


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Sarkikos
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: hokkaido53]
      #6443605 - 04/02/14 01:51 PM

Roy in Maryland (or should that be Roy in Taos?),

I've managed to see 5053 through my 10" f/4.8 Dob in a yellow/green zone site on the Eastern Shore. At least its nearness to M53 makes it easier to locate.

NGC 5053 is in the H400 II list. It's also in Don Pensack's Best 500 or so List, and in Mullaney's Herschel Showpieces. I don't recall it being especially difficult compared to some of the faint galaxies in the H400 II or Herschel 3.


Mike in Maryland

I see that you finally bagged 5053 in Taos, NM. Skies much darker there than at home?


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hokkaido53
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Sarkikos]
      #6444961 - 04/03/14 09:15 AM

Quote:

Roy in Maryland (or should that be Roy in Taos?),

I've managed to see 5053 through my 10" f/4.8 Dob in a yellow/green zone site on the Eastern Shore. At least its nearness to M53 makes it easier to locate.

NGC 5053 is in the H400 II list. It's also in Don Pensack's Best 500 or so List, and in Mullaney's Herschel Showpieces. I don't recall it being especially difficult compared to some of the faint galaxies in the H400 II or Herschel 3.


Mike in Maryland

I see that you finally bagged 5053 in Taos, NM. Skies much darker there than at home?




Hi, Mike,

Yes, we moved to Taos, NM, last summer, where the skies are so clear, they're gray at night, not black. They're gray because I am seeing the collective light of stars and objects which individually are below 6th magnitude. (This really surprised me, but it does make sense.)

I spotted 5053 when it was about 10 or 15 degrees above the horizon. I was able to finish the Herschel list also. (I used Steve O'Meara's book, not the AL's.) I've found some of Alvin Huey's books helpful as well.

Roy in Taos


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Sarkikos
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: hokkaido53]
      #6444975 - 04/03/14 09:27 AM

Congratulations - on completing the H400 AND moving to a much darker area! Maybe I should look into NM for my retirement?

One of the best tools I've found for helping in locating and verifying objects in the H400, H400 II and Herschel 3 lists is SkySafari Pro on a tablet. I don't have goto or DSCs. I just use SSP, Telrad and a 70mm finder.

Mike


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hokkaido53
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Reged: 05/07/12

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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Sarkikos]
      #6445017 - 04/03/14 09:54 AM

Quote:

Congratulations - on completing the H400 AND moving to a much darker area! Maybe I should look into NM for my retirement?

One of the best tools I've found for helping in locating and verifying objects in the H400, H400 II and Herschel 3 lists is SkySafari Pro on a tablet. I don't have goto or DSCs. I just use SSP, Telrad and a 70mm finder.

Mike




Yeah, it's great out here, very astro-friendly.

I just turned 70, so I've decided to take it easy from now on. Consequently, I've invested in the ArgoNavis and ServoCAT. If your eyes (and back) are still young and fresh, you might not need these aids.

Clear skies,

Roy


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LivingNDixie
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: hokkaido53]
      #6445068 - 04/03/14 10:28 AM

Quote:

Quote:

Roy in Maryland (or should that be Roy in Taos?),

I've managed to see 5053 through my 10" f/4.8 Dob in a yellow/green zone site on the Eastern Shore. At least its nearness to M53 makes it easier to locate.

NGC 5053 is in the H400 II list. It's also in Don Pensack's Best 500 or so List, and in Mullaney's Herschel Showpieces. I don't recall it being especially difficult compared to some of the faint galaxies in the H400 II or Herschel 3.


Mike in Maryland

I see that you finally bagged 5053 in Taos, NM. Skies much darker there than at home?




Hi, Mike,

Yes, we moved to Taos, NM, last summer, where the skies are so clear, they're gray at night, not black. They're gray because I am seeing the collective light of stars and objects which individually are below 6th magnitude. (This really surprised me, but it does make sense.)

I spotted 5053 when it was about 10 or 15 degrees above the horizon. I was able to finish the Herschel list also. (I used Steve O'Meara's book, not the AL's.) I've found some of Alvin Huey's books helpful as well.

Roy in Taos




The O'Meara book to the H400 to me is essential for completing the list.


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scopethis
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: LivingNDixie]
      #6446389 - 04/04/14 12:38 AM

well, my notes say this thing was a real flop, w/10" SCT it was very faint, doesn't look like a globular cluster, appears more as a transparent nebula..

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Nick Anderson
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: scopethis]
      #6446487 - 04/04/14 02:24 AM

Just attempted this elusive object for the first time in my XT8 on April 2:

NGC 5053, globular cluster in Coma Berenices: difficult averted vision object; merely a weak glow about 7 arcminutes in size; hints of possibly resolved faint stars are seen; minimal central concentration; viewed at 48x and 96x; near M53, but outside the FOV at 48x

-Nick Anderson


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Sarkikos
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: LivingNDixie]
      #6446622 - 04/04/14 06:51 AM

Quote:

The O'Meara book to the H400 to me is essential for completing the list.




Since moving to SkySafari Pro on a tablet, I don't see any DSO book as essential. I read them at home for inspiration and general information, but I never take them to the field. I don't use printed atlases anymore either. They just are not necessary. They gather dust now.

Mike


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ensign
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Reged: 12/16/08

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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Sarkikos]
      #6447107 - 04/04/14 12:21 PM

Quote:

Quote:

The O'Meara book to the H400 to me is essential for completing the list.




Since moving to SkySafari Pro on a tablet, I don't see any DSO book as essential. I read them at home for inspiration and general information, but I never take them to the field. I don't use printed atlases anymore either. They just are not necessary. They gather dust now.

Mike




I, too, have Sky Safari and rely on it as a star atlas. I find, though, that atlases and observing guides are two different, albeit related, things.

The atlas helps when it comes to finding things in the night sky. The observing guide provides some ideas about what is worth looking at/for and details you might want to check out.

While Sky Safari does provide some good info about many objects, I still find myself perusing observing guides when planning an evening's stargazing.


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hokkaido53
sage


Reged: 05/07/12

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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: ensign]
      #6447157 - 04/04/14 12:47 PM

Quote:

Quote:

Quote:

The O'Meara book to the H400 to me is essential for completing the list.




Since moving to SkySafari Pro on a tablet, I don't see any DSO book as essential. I read them at home for inspiration and general information, but I never take them to the field. I don't use printed atlases anymore either. They just are not necessary. They gather dust now.

Mike




I, too, have Sky Safari and rely on it as a star atlas. I find, though, that atlases and observing guides are two different, albeit related, things.

The atlas helps when it comes to finding things in the night sky. The observing guide provides some ideas about what is worth looking at/for and details you might want to check out.

While Sky Safari does provide some good info about many objects, I still find myself perusing observing guides when planning an evening's stargazing.




I like to compare my observations with what O'Meara and other authors see. You can learn a lot from other peoples' viewpoints. Another valuable set of books is the two-volume "Night Sky Observers' Guide", edited by Sanner and Kepple. Both volumes are filled with drawings, photos and observations from several dozen amateurs across the country. I've even contacted a few of them over the years and compared notes. For me, this creates a kind of "community" of observers.

- Roy in Taos


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aatt
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Reged: 07/26/12

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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: hokkaido53]
      #6447160 - 04/04/14 12:49 PM

I saw it last year from a green---blue zone.Very faint and "loose". It is invisible from my orange zone in my 15"

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David Knisely
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Sarkikos]
      #6447339 - 04/04/14 02:16 PM

Quote:

Quote:

The O'Meara book to the H400 to me is essential for completing the list.




Since moving to SkySafari Pro on a tablet, I don't see any DSO book as essential. I read them at home for inspiration and general information, but I never take them to the field. I don't use printed atlases anymore either. They just are not necessary. They gather dust now.

Mike




While Sky Safari is good, it lacks greatly in its handling of the descriptive material for many deep-sky objects. Even with my Pro edition, I find I have to either break out Megastar or just open Uranometria, especially for diffuse nebulae and some planetaries which Sky Safari does not plot. In fact, on some of the more obscure and interesting objects, THE ARP ATLAS OF PECULIAR GALAXIES is a vital work for reference, along with my Uranometria Field Guide. Sky Safari is good, but for the real deep-sky enthusiast, it just isn't quite ready for prime-time. I still have to have a couple of my detailed reference books in the field with me to cover all the bases. Clear skies to you.


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Sarkikos
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: David Knisely]
      #6447386 - 04/04/14 02:36 PM

Quote:

While Sky Safari is good, it lacks greatly in its handling of the descriptive material for many deep-sky objects. Even with my Pro edition, I find I have to either break out Megastar or just open Uranometria, especially for diffuse nebulae and some planetaries which Sky Safari does not plot. In fact, on some of the more obscure and interesting objects, THE ARP ATLAS OF PECULIAR GALAXIES is a vital work for reference, along with my Uranometria Field Guide. Sky Safari is good, but for the real deep-sky enthusiast, it just isn't quite ready for prime-time. I still have to have a couple of my detailed reference books in the field with me to cover all the bases. Clear skies to you.




OK, then I must not be a real deep-sky enthusiast. Maybe when I upgrade from my 10" Dob to a 14" or 15" I'll see the advantage to the old-school tools.

So far though, SSP seems very productive for going through the H400, Herschel II and Herschel 3 lists. I would have hated to do that relying on only field guides and hard-copy star atlases. IME, they are very cumbersome and clunky compared to decent software like SSP on a 10" tablet. I'd rather see SSP steadily improve and include more descriptive material than have to go back to hard-copy aids.

Mike


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hokkaido53
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Reged: 05/07/12

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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Sarkikos]
      #6447524 - 04/04/14 03:52 PM

Quote:

Quote:

While Sky Safari is good, it lacks greatly in its handling of the descriptive material for many deep-sky objects. Even with my Pro edition, I find I have to either break out Megastar or just open Uranometria, especially for diffuse nebulae and some planetaries which Sky Safari does not plot. In fact, on some of the more obscure and interesting objects, THE ARP ATLAS OF PECULIAR GALAXIES is a vital work for reference, along with my Uranometria Field Guide. Sky Safari is good, but for the real deep-sky enthusiast, it just isn't quite ready for prime-time. I still have to have a couple of my detailed reference books in the field with me to cover all the bases. Clear skies to you.




OK, then I must not be a real deep-sky enthusiast. Maybe when I upgrade from my 10" Dob to a 14" or 15" I'll see the advantage to the old-school tools.

So far though, SSP seems very productive for going through the H400, Herschel II and Herschel 3 lists. I would have hated to do that relying on only field guides and hard-copy star atlases. IME, they are very cumbersome and clunky compared to decent software like SSP on a 10" tablet. I'd rather see SSP steadily improve and include more descriptive material than have to go back to hard-copy aids.

Mike




Mike, you do have a point about the clumsiness of those books. However, I don't take them into the field with me. I read them before and after observing. For field observing, I just write down a list of what I want to see, and then consult it with a red flashlight, while observing. I "talk" my notes into a hand-held recorder, then write them down when I get home.

Roy


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hokkaido53
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Reged: 05/07/12

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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: David Knisely]
      #6447535 - 04/04/14 03:57 PM

David:

You mention THE ARP ATLAS OF PECULIAR GALAXIES. Is that the guide by Alvin Huey?

Thanks in advance,

Roy in Taos


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Sarkikos
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: hokkaido53]
      #6447803 - 04/04/14 06:45 PM

Quote:

Mike, you do have a point about the clumsiness of those books. However, I don't take them into the field with me. I read them before and after observing. For field observing, I just write down a list of what I want to see, and then consult it with a red flashlight, while observing.




That is basically what I used to do, too. I'd go through the books - and my spreadsheet based on the SAC DSO list, of course! - and make a list of objects to see on an upcoming trip to the dark site. I'd put a sticky note - with the object designations - on the edge of each page of Uranometria or SA2k that the objects where on. I'd go through star hops on these maps before I did it at the dark site.

This was a lot of upfront work in an attempt to streamline the process for when I'd finally be out in the field with my telescope. But it was still cumbersome and clunky, dealing with these written lists, sticky notes, flipping between map pages, holding a redlight (or using a headlamp), and trying to hold up an oversized heavy atlas at the telescope. I don't like jumping back and forth to an atlas on a table. Everything has to be with me right at the telescope. Not much fun in any case.

For SSP, I preload my lists into the program and I'm done. I don't even bother working out star hopping routes beforehand. I do all that on-the-fly at the dark site. I just go from item to item on the list, making notes in the program.

I don't intend to go back to field books and hard-copy atlases, at least not for use in the field. Those nights are over.

Mike


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okieav8rAdministrator
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: hokkaido53]
      #6447908 - 04/04/14 07:32 PM

Quote:

David:

You mention THE ARP ATLAS OF PECULIAR GALAXIES. Is that the guide by Alvin Huey?

Thanks in advance,

Roy in Taos




Hi Roy.

This is the book. It's written by Dennis Webb and Jeff Kanipe. A very handy book, and well worth the price.


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hokkaido53
sage


Reged: 05/07/12

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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Sarkikos]
      #6448206 - 04/04/14 10:45 PM

Quote:

Quote:

Mike, you do have a point about the clumsiness of those books. However, I don't take them into the field with me. I read them before and after observing. For field observing, I just write down a list of what I want to see, and then consult it with a red flashlight, while observing.




That is basically what I used to do, too. I'd go through the books - and my spreadsheet based on the SAC DSO list, of course! - and make a list of objects to see on an upcoming trip to the dark site. I'd put a sticky note - with the object designations - on the edge of each page of Uranometria or SA2k that the objects where on. I'd go through star hops on these maps before I did it at the dark site.

This was a lot of upfront work in an attempt to streamline the process for when I'd finally be out in the field with my telescope. But it was still cumbersome and clunky, dealing with these written lists, sticky notes, flipping between map pages, holding a redlight (or using a headlamp), and trying to hold up an oversized heavy atlas at the telescope. I don't like jumping back and forth to an atlas on a table. Everything has to be with me right at the telescope. Not much fun in any case.

For SSP, I preload my lists into the program and I'm done. I don't even bother working out star hopping routes beforehand. I do all that on-the-fly at the dark site. I just go from item to item on the list, making notes in the program.

I don't intend to go back to field books and hard-copy atlases, at least not for use in the field. Those nights are over.

Mike



Hmmmm. I'll look into some of that. Thanks for the suggestions.

Roy


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David Knisely
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Sarkikos]
      #6448388 - 04/05/14 02:39 AM Attachment (8 downloads)

Sarkikos wrote:

Quote:

OK, then I must not be a real deep-sky enthusiast. Maybe when I upgrade from my 10" Dob to a 14" or 15" I'll see the advantage to the old-school tools.




No, the problem is that Sky Safari Pro has tried to do *everything* rather than concentrating on deep-sky as the software atlases like MEGASTAR or the hard copy data sources I mentioned do. This makes it a bit weak in some areas. For example, Megastar and the Uranometria field guide provide one thing totally ignored by Sky Safari: a galaxy's surface brightness figure. This is vital in determining whether an object might be visible or how difficult it might be to see in a given aperture. Also sometimes missing is a galaxy's classification (especially for the fainter targets). With globular clusters, things like the V-tip and Horizontal branch magnitudes are not provided by Sky Safari Pro, which are vital in determining whether you may see stars in those clusters with a given aperture. Instead, silly nearly useless things like ecliptic coordinates or hour angle are put in Sky Safari Pro which have absolutely no bearing on how to locate the object or what instrument it might require in order to see it. One nice item that Megastar provides is thumbnail images from the DSS of most small and faint galaxies. That item is missing from Sky Safari Pro. The plotting of double stars is also a problem, as with most atlases, you can see the little short line drawn across the symbols to indicate a star is a double. With Sky Safari Pro, you have to activate that labeling option which clutters the screen with names of doubles instead of just using that little line. Also, the data on the double's separation and position angle is not provided with a date of when that observation was made (Megastar does that, although not well). The coverage of dark nebulae by Sky Safari pro also has some problems, as it lists more than a few of them that not easily visible to amateurs (even in images, like IREC 320 west of Regulus).

This isn't to say that Sky Safari Pro isn't a useful tool for the deep-sky observer, as it can definitely be. However, it still has a little "growing up" to do, which is one reason I still carry some of my hard copy tools in my "portable library" with me when observing (see below). Clear skies to you.


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Sarkikos
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: okieav8r]
      #6448610 - 04/05/14 09:13 AM

Quote:

This is the book. It's written by Dennis Webb and Jeff Kanipe. A very handy book, and well worth the price.




The ARP book is one of three I intend to buy next from Willman-Bell, along with Epic Moon and Star Clusters.

Mike


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hokkaido53
sage


Reged: 05/07/12

Loc: New Mexico
Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Sarkikos]
      #6448732 - 04/05/14 10:14 AM

David - What is the difference between the Uranometria Atlas and the Deep Sky Field Guide? Also, how low in magnitude does the Atlas go? I live under blue-to-black skies (depending on the time of year)and can usually see down to 14th magnitude on any dry summer night. Consequently, if the Atlas goes to only 10th magnitude, it might not be of use.

Thanks,

Roy in Taos


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David Knisely
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: hokkaido53]
      #6448791 - 04/05/14 10:54 AM

Quote:

David - What is the difference between the Uranometria Atlas and the Deep Sky Field Guide? Also, how low in magnitude does the Atlas go? I live under blue-to-black skies (depending on the time of year)and can usually see down to 14th magnitude on any dry summer night. Consequently, if the Atlas goes to only 10th magnitude, it might not be of use.

Thanks,

Roy in Taos




The Uranometria 2000 2nd edition Field Guide has just the numerical data (ID, position, angular size, magnitude, type, surface brightness, etc.) for all the deep-sky objects which are plotted in the Atlas itself and that is it. It does not cover all the stars that are shown (down to about magnitude 9.75), but it does cover all the galaxies plotted (down to around 15th magnitude (blue photometric band) or that are 1.5 arc minutes in size or larger (25,895 galaxies)). As with most print star atlases, I don't need an atlas that covers really faint stars (it would get pretty cluttered pretty quickly), but only those bright enough to be useful when doing a standard star-hop with my finderscope. Heck, a lot of the time, I just need a reminder of where something is, so I will just pull out the Pocket Sky Atlas and use it to get me into the ballpark. If, for some reason, I need to go fainter than Uranometria 2000, I use the software MEGASTAR. Clear skies to you.


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Sarkikos
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: David Knisely]
      #6448804 - 04/05/14 11:02 AM

Quote:

No, the problem is that Sky Safari Pro has tried to do everything rather than concentrating on deep-sky as the software atlases like MEGASTAR or the hard copy data sources I mentioned do. This makes it weak in some areas.




I agree. There are many doodads I could do without in SSP. I don't need satellites, for one thing. I also don't like the default object lists that you cannot delete from the program. I don't need a list for satellites, brightest stars, nearest stars, variable stars. The asterisms list would be great if it were a through listing of the moderate to small asterisms, not just the big ones that nearly every amateur astronomer already knows - or ought to know.

Quote:

First, Megastar and the Uranometria field guide provide one thing totally ignored by Sky Safari: a galaxy's surface brightness figure. This is vital in determining whether an object might be visible or how difficult it might be to see in a given aperture. Also sometimes missing is a galaxy's classification (especially for the fainter targets).




Yes, surface brightness of galaxies should be included. It could prevent the observer from wasting time looking for a galaxy that might not be visible through their telescope. I like to know the VB and the SB before I attempt to bag a galaxy.

On the other hand, SSP does show the apparent size and orientation of the galaxy with an outline on the screen. I appreciate this feature. It has helped me to verify galaxies in the field.

Quote:

One nice item that Megastar provides is thumbnail images from the DSS of most small and faint galaxies.




SSP has images, but only for the brighter galaxies. Yes, images for the smaller and fainter ones would be nice, but IME it's not necessary. I do fine with the galaxy's location among the background stars, and the outline of the galaxy. That has been enough for me to verify hundreds of galaxies with SSP.

Quote:

The plotting of double stars is also a problem, as with most atlases, you can see the little short line drawn across the symbols to indicate a star is a double. With Sky Safari Pro, you have to activate that labeling option which clutters the screen with names of doubles instead of just using that little line. Also, the data on the double's separation and position angle is not provided with a date of when that observation was made (Megastar does that, although not well).




I'm not really into doubles, but I can see that the line through the double's image and the other information would be helpful.

Quote:

The coverage of dark nebulae by Sky Safari pro also has some problems, as it lists more than a few of them that not easily visible to amateurs (even in images, like IREC 320 west of Regulus).




I do like looking for dark nebulae. The worst problem with SSP for DN - which you don't mention - is that the program shows them as squares and rectangles, not the natural outlines. It is not very helpful to see dark nebulae indicated by a quilt of overlapping squares and rectangles. I actually do bring along the SA2k when I want to hunt for DN, because it gives the natural outlines.

Quote:

This isn't to say that Sky Safari Pro isn't a useful tool for the deep-sky observer, as it can definitely be. However, it still has a little "growing up" to do, which is one reason I still carry some of my hard copy tools in my "portable library" with me when observing (see below). Clear skies to you.




I have most of the hard copy tools in your photo. But with the exception of the SA2k for dark nebulae, I only use them at home, and even then not so much any more.

Mike


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Sarkikos
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Sarkikos]
      #6448814 - 04/05/14 11:10 AM

I used Uranometria for awhile. But I like to have my charts right at the telescope with me, not on a table. Uranometria was just too heavy and awkward for use at the eyepiece. So I cut the pages out of mine, slipped them into clear covers, and split them out into six binders. This made them easier to hold for long periods while consulting them at the telescope.

But soon after, I discovered SkySafari Pro and downloaded it on my tablet. Now Uranometria stays home.

Megastar sounds like a great program. But is there a version for the Android tablet? No, there isn't. IME, a laptop - even a so-called "mini" laptop - is too heavy for holding more than a few minutes at the telescope. No running back and forth to a table for me.

Mike


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hokkaido53
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Sarkikos]
      #6449087 - 04/05/14 02:19 PM

Mike and David - Thanks for the discussion!

I don't think I'll need Sky Safari, since I already have ArgoNavis and ServoCAT installed on my scope. However, I still need to run back and forth from the table, often with an eyepiece in one hand and a red flashlight in the other, so I'm always looking for ways to simplify things. Also, I'm always looking for challenges (the "thrill of the hunt"), so I plan to purchase the Arp Galaxies manual.

Thanks again and clear skies,

Roy in Taos


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Feidb
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: hokkaido53]
      #6449193 - 04/05/14 03:24 PM

M-53 and NGC-5053 are the June 2014 Las Vegas Astronomical Society Observer's Challenge objects. We thought they'd be a great pair to challenge everyone's observing skills. From the feedback here, I think so!

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Sarkikos
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Feidb]
      #6449316 - 04/05/14 04:23 PM



Mike


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hokkaido53
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Feidb]
      #6449610 - 04/05/14 07:17 PM

Quote:

M-53 and NGC-5053 are the June 2014 Las Vegas Astronomical Society Observer's Challenge objects. We thought they'd be a great pair to challenge everyone's observing skills. From the feedback here, I think so!



Sounds good.


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kfiscus
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: hokkaido53]
      #6451142 - 04/06/14 04:19 PM

To get back to the original question, yes I've seen it and its pairing with M-53 has made it one of my favorites. When I saw the thread appear, the NGC # looked familiar- always a good sign. For an object's number to ring a bell with so many digits out there means that 5053 is a treat.

I love pairs of objects that offer contrast or visual appeal. This pair, M-46 and its PN neighbor, M-35 and 2158, 6939 and 6946, and the Coathanger and 6802, to name a few.


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Feidb
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: kfiscus]
      #6451163 - 04/06/14 04:31 PM

I was going to give it a shot last night at our outreach at Red Rocks Visitor's Center on the west side of Las Vegas, but fugeddaboudit! Too much light pollution. Better luck next time.

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Sarkikos
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: kfiscus]
      #6451631 - 04/06/14 08:43 PM

Quote:

To get back to the original question, yes I've seen it and its pairing with M-53 has made it one of my favorites. When I saw the thread appear, the NGC # looked familiar- always a good sign. For an object's number to ring a bell with so many digits out there means that 5053 is a treat.




Yep. M53 and NGC 5053. Very easy to remember. I can use all the help I can get!

Quote:

I love pairs of objects that offer contrast or visual appeal. This pair, M-46 and its PN neighbor, M-35 and 2158, 6939 and 6946, and the Coathanger and 6802, to name a few.




Not to mention M51 and its companion, M81 and M82, the Double Cluster.

Interesting DSO pairs. That would make a nice list of objects. I'm pretty sure there are already lists like that out there. If there aren't, there ought to be. The ARP list is to some extent a list of interesting - and interacting - pairs.

I ought to put together a list of DSO pairs for SkySafari Pro - if there isn't one already out there somewhere. I like lists of colorful contrasting doubles, too.

Mike


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LivingNDixie
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Feidb]
      #6452480 - 04/07/14 10:33 AM

Quote:

I was going to give it a shot last night at our outreach at Red Rocks Visitor's Center on the west side of Las Vegas, but fugeddaboudit! Too much light pollution. Better luck next time.




Try the Lee Canyon Ski Area parking lot. A wonderful site, just don't set up in the helicopter designated area. Another nice site in the Las Vegas area is Teutonia Peak.


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Achernar
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: hokkaido53]
      #6460898 - 04/11/14 07:00 PM Attachment (7 downloads)

It's scattered across a large slice of the sky, and the individual stars are faint. It does not look like an average globular cluster, it's a dim glow speckled with faint stars. It took a few tries with my 10 and 15-inch Dobs, but it did appear in both from the yellow zone sites I usually make do with.

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nytecam
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Achernar]
      #6462168 - 04/12/14 01:48 PM Attachment (10 downloads)

My 30s shot from Tuesday night of this sparce cluster via the 'fast' new Lodestar-Mx2 camera

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Starman1
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: nytecam]
      #6462222 - 04/12/14 02:32 PM

Quote:

My 30s shot from Tuesday night of this sparce cluster via the 'fast' new Lodestar-Mx2 camera



That is a very fair rendition of how the cluster appears in an 8" scope in dark skies.


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nytecam
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Re: Have you seen globular cluster NGC5053? new [Re: Starman1]
      #6466947 - 04/15/14 04:32 AM Attachment (8 downloads)

Quote:

Quote:

My 30s shot from Tuesday night of this sparce cluster via the 'fast' new Lodestar-Mx2 camera



That is a very fair rendition of how the cluster appears in an 8" scope in dark skies.


Thanks Don - NGC 5466 in Boo @ m9.2V is of comparable brightness and sparsity as NGC 5053

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