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Equipment Discussions >> Mounts

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Jon Rista
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 01/10/14

Loc: Colorado
Re: Buying a telescope...how important is the mount? new [Re: james7ca]
      #6330113 - 01/23/14 08:47 AM

Quote:

If you used the Hyperstar system and kept the remainder of the weight as low as possible I'd think that a Mach1 GTO would be more than fine with a C11. Don't know about the C14, that might be pushing it.





It seems like it would. Looked up the weight of the C11, it is 28lb (13kg) and the Mach1 supports 45lb (20kg). That should leave enough room for a finder scope, astrocam/DSLR, and all the necessary guiding and cabling aparatus, right?

I am basically writing off the C14. I think it will be an EdgeHD 11" or maybe an AT12RC (depends on whether the Astro-Tech works with hyperstar or not.)

The Mach1 should be more than enough with my 600mm lens. That puppy, thanks to multiple fluorite elements and light weight barrel materials, only weighs 8.3lb. The camera is only a couple pounds more.

Quote:


Unless you have a really dark site you are going to reach sky-fog pretty quickly with an f/2 system. Going narrow band would help and with shorter exposures the mount becomes less of an issue. However, at f/2 the 11" EdgeHD would result in only about 550mm of effective focal length which is a little short for most galaxies and smaller nebulae. However, I'm pretty sure the Mach1 GTO would work well at f/7 or with whatever other reducer you might select.





I plan to image every DSO there is in the long run...so large nebula that span wide fields, as well as smaller nebula, and maybe even small regions of larger nebula (like M42). I also plan to get a proper CCD with dual-stage TEC and built-in guiding and all that in the long run as well, so the camera won't be as heavy as the 5D III in the end, I think.

Quote:


In any case, if you go Astro-Physics I hope you are a fairly young person, since otherwise you might not live long enough to actually find one. If you are lucky you might be able to get one of their smaller mounts in 2014, but I wouldn't count on it unless you put your money down soon or just happen to find a used unit for sale when you're ready.





Well, I'm 34. Not exactly young, but not old either. ;P When you say "smaller mounts", does the Mach1 qualify?

Quote:


As for the CGEM DX, yes you'll find some nice photos that have been taken on that and even lesser mounts. The question then becomes how often will you be able to reproduce those results (night after night) and what is the likelihood of you actually getting a sample that will perform as well as the one that produced that photo. You can take your chances, be ready to suffer some aggravation, and hope for the best and maybe succeed. I think there are probably only two ways to guarantee success, either you keep the focal length and weight down to something pretty low or you invest in a high-end mount.




Yeah, based on what everyone here, including yourself, has said, I'm pretty much writing off the CGEM DX. It sounds like it just isn't up to snuff, and while I am basically diving in head first here with my first telescope, I really do intend to be serious about astrophotography. I'm the kind of person who likes to invest in what will do the job, do it well, and last for decades. (Hence the EF 600mm f/4 L IS II...)

It sounds like Astro-Physics is the place to go for that kind of quality. That said, if I am UNABLE to find an Astro-Physics mount in a reasonable time frame, what would be the next best thing? Someone mentioned the iOptron CEM60 earlier. That sounds like an interesting mount, and it also seems to have an enhanced encoder for high precision tracking. It doesn't seem like it is available yet, but would that be a mount of similar quality? Or are we talking about something of a lesser order than Astro-Physics?


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Jon Rista
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 01/10/14

Loc: Colorado
Re: Buying a telescope...how important is the mount? new [Re: dawziecat]
      #6330116 - 01/23/14 08:49 AM

Quote:

Quote:

Part of this is because I just found the Astro-Tech 6" f/9 RC Astrograph




Why would you mess with that, when you already have this?




OOH! How in the world did you get an SBIG mounted on there!? SBIG cams are on the top of my list once I get the mount and scope. If I can mount an SBIG right to the 600mm f/4, wow, I'd be one ecstatically happy dude!


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Jon Rista
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 01/10/14

Loc: Colorado
Re: Buying a telescope...how important is the mount? new [Re: Hilmi]
      #6330118 - 01/23/14 08:52 AM

Quote:

Terry,

I never tried that particular lens, but my 70-200 F2.8 L still has chromatic aberrations even at F5. If you split the 3 channels you find the blue channel stars twice as big as the other channels. My 8" RC on the other hand gives tight stars in all colors, although it is very slow in comparison. It also has more pleasing diffraction pattern.




CA on the Canon EF 600mm f/4 Mark II's is VERY low. They use both UD (same thing as ED) glass as well as two Fluorite elements. Aberrations are very low. Maybe not quite as low as a quadruplet apochromat like the Takahashi, but still about as low as you are going to find in a DSLR lens. The low aberrations at maximum aperture and the weight were the two reasons why I spent the dough on the new Mark II, instead of picking up the older 600mm f/4 Mark I for half the price (and almost four more pounds of weight.)


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Hilmi
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Reged: 03/07/10

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Re: Buying a telescope...how important is the mount? new [Re: Jon Rista]
      #6330120 - 01/23/14 08:52 AM

Paramount MX should be your plan B at the budget you indicated if you have to have new.

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Jon Rista
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 01/10/14

Loc: Colorado
Re: Buying a telescope...how important is the mount? new [Re: Hilmi]
      #6330123 - 01/23/14 08:54 AM

Quote:

Paramount MX should be your plan B at the budget you indicated if you have to have new.




Paramount MX...going to look that up now. I don't have to have new...I am actually thinking the 900GTO might be exactly what I need, if I can find a whole package deal used from someone.

BTW, does anyone know how many objects the Astro-Physics controller has? And, for that matter, how many of those objects are really the things you would be interested in observing and imaging anyway? I've seen counts from 20,000 to 40,000 to 300,000+...does it matter if you have more than 20,000 pre-programmed objects?


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Hilmi
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Re: Buying a telescope...how important is the mount? new [Re: Jon Rista]
      #6330143 - 01/23/14 09:04 AM

Object count is mostly irrelevant for astro-imaging, as most likely you will be using a laptop with planetarium software to plan and frame shots. Especially if you are planing to move to CCD imaging in the future.

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Starhawk
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Reged: 09/16/08

Loc: Tucson, Arizona
Re: Buying a telescope...how important is the mount? new [Re: Jon Rista]
      #6330169 - 01/23/14 09:14 AM

Ok, so, here we go:

You're buying a mount, and that will determine what telescope you can use.

If you want to do f/2 with a DSLR, that's hyperstar, and it only works with Celestron OTAs. Fastar was the original version from the late 1980s which supported cameras with tiny chips compared to APS format DSLRs. Hyperstar is a very good start because f/2 will give you images with the least tracking difficulty.

If you're in The city and need to go mobile for astrophotography, you really need to pay attention to weight and setup difficulty. If you want to support big OTAs like a C14, you will be moving hundreds of pounds of equipment every time you set up.

-Rich

Quote:

Hello all. I have been in the market for a telescope for a while now. Over a year, to be exact, however last year I opted to buy the Canon EF 600mm f/4 L IS II lens, which clocks in at $12,800 instead of a telescope, as wildlife and bird photography is an equal passion. Now that the nature photography lens has been purchased, I've been saving my funds for a telescope. I hope to buy something this year, hopefully by the time summer rolls around so I can enjoy the warmer nights (but we'll see how the funds accumulate, and what kinds of decisions I make about specific gear.)

Anyway, regarding the mount. I understand that the mount is an important piece of equipment, and that one needs to invest properly in a quality mount that will last over the years, and support a whole range of possible OTAs over those years. I am curious exactly how important the mount is, though. I am still debating about exactly which OTA to get...on the top of my list are the Celestron EdgeHD 11" and 14" SCTs, the Officina Stellare Hiper APO refractors, and maybe the AT10RC.

I really like what I've read about Celestron mounts. The two mounts I am interested in are the CGEM DX and the CGE Pro. There is a pretty big price gap between these two, with the Pro being more than twice as expensive. I've read a number of threads here, but I haven't really found enough information to really help me zero in on which mount I should get. I want to save money where I can, but I don't want to cut corners that shouldn't be cut. Is the Pro overkill? Is the DX more than sufficient to hold any one of the telescopes on my list? I'll probably have more than one scope at some point, and I'm wondering if the DX would be a good enough mount for all of them, if I needed to buy more than one.

Anyway, thanks for any insight!




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Jon Rista
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 01/10/14

Loc: Colorado
Re: Buying a telescope...how important is the mount? new [Re: Hilmi]
      #6330190 - 01/23/14 09:30 AM

Quote:

Object count is mostly irrelevant for astro-imaging, as most likely you will be using a laptop with planetarium software to plan and frame shots. Especially if you are planing to move to CCD imaging in the future.




Ah, interesting. I had my eye on Nebulosity 3 for capture software, and PHD for guiding. I am not sure if either of those have a planetarium catalog of objects. What are the options here? I was also planning to use a Windows 8 tablet, as they are much more energy efficient and lighter to use out in the field than a full blown laptop...but a lot of software like Starry Night does not seem to work with Windows 8. *sob*


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Spacetravelerx
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Reged: 12/23/12

Loc: New Mexico
Re: Buying a telescope...how important is the mount? new [Re: Jon Rista]
      #6330203 - 01/23/14 09:44 AM

Quote:

Quote:

Object count is mostly irrelevant for astro-imaging, as most likely you will be using a laptop with planetarium software to plan and frame shots. Especially if you are planing to move to CCD imaging in the future.




Ah, interesting. I had my eye on Nebulosity 3 for capture software, and PHD for guiding. I am not sure if either of those have a planetarium catalog of objects. What are the options here? I was also planning to use a Windows 8 tablet, as they are much more energy efficient and lighter to use out in the field than a full blown laptop...but a lot of software like Starry Night does not seem to work with Windows 8. *sob*





Well this is a hot topic this morning and some excellent points made by many people here.

My 2 cents worth:

* I use Nebulosity - excellent software.
* I also avoid Windows like the plague. Being energy efficient I work with a MacBook Pro and am migrating to a MacBookAir for more field use. I also run SkySafari wirelessly from my iPad and iPhone (and Mac Pros). Excellent piece of software.
--> Side note: after my current project (A cubesat on the ISS), we are planning a working on more AstroSoftware for the iPad and MacOS. We just need some free time.
* AP1100, Paramount MX - excellent mounts worth considering. I have chosen the AP1100 to add to my fleet of mounts (God help me - I am becoming a GEM Mount hoarder!).
* Mach1GTO - Excellent mount and more portable than the above.
* You should consider the LX850 mount your list. This is the real deal. Also, it easily handles the 90 lbs, none of this "50%" malarky.
* If you are observing from home - wonderful. But as Rich has said, if you are going to remote sites you may want to rethink how big of an OTA you will run in the field. Definitely consider how much gear you will be hauling out to your site and power you will use up.

I really love my 14" f/8 ACF, but I won't be traveling much with it - it is a beast, as it should be.

If you go out in the field much you may want to consider the Mach1GTO with an excellent APO that is tied in with an iPad and/or MacBook Air. Even at home, I do use my APOs with my 14" and I go back and forth what to use (depends on the object and picture I want to take).

All good advice here, lots of options!


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Jon Rista
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 01/10/14

Loc: Colorado
Re: Buying a telescope...how important is the mount? new [Re: Spacetravelerx]
      #6330229 - 01/23/14 10:01 AM

Thanks Spacetravelerx! Everyone seems to have pretty good things to say about the Mach1GTO...I think that puppy is at the top of my list right now. I am hoping more opinions roll in through the day...I'm interested in hearing what others have to say, see what other options there may be.

I'd looked at the Meade LX850 mount before. It seems to be pretty much on par with the Celestron CGE Pro, almost point for point. I've also seen the CGE Pro slew a big 14" EdgeHD around like it was nothing...so I am pretty sure it could handle the 90lb weight as well. I used to love Meade as a kid, but lately it seems they have a number of problems, including legal issues? Anyway, I decided a while ago that I was going to avoid Meade...just doesn't seem like a safe company over the long term, in case I ever need replacement parts or whatnot. I have a bit of an affinity for Celestron these days anyway, I think.

As for Apple, not gonna happen with me. I can't stand apple products, and that isn't for a lack of using them, either...I have reluctantly had to use them a lot. I've had multiple generations of iPhone, iPads, even a brand new Retina MacBook just a few months back. Never liked Apple products, don't think I ever will. They just don't jive with the way I do things. Not to mention the fact that a Surface Pro 2 is a far more capable device than an iPad will ever be, with stellar battery life to boot (thing can go for like 15 hours.) My whole entire house is Microsoft now that I've expunged all Apple products... ;P Only seems logical to stick with it now. I just have to light a fire under Starry Night and Redshift and whoever else develops that kind of software and get em moving on Windows 8 updates.

Regarding observing, just so everyone knows...it will all be away from my home for the foreseeable future. I live pretty close the the outskirts of the Denver metropolitan area in Colorado. If I drive a bit over the speed limit, I can get to some VERY dark skies (albeit with two bubbles of LP on the southern and western horizons) within 50 minutes. In Bortle Scale terms, probably zones 2-3 (rural dark to true dark). If I drive for two to three hours, I can find exceptionally dark sights. It's one of the better things about Colorado...we don't have to travel half the country to find truly dark skies. Denver metro and Colorado Springs are the main LP regions...move east for an hour, or move west for two hours, and you can find REALLY DARK skies. Some of those dark skies are up at 11,000 feet or more, so the air can be incredibly crisp and clear and clean...seeing is pretty darn good up on the western side of the divide.

Edited by Jon Rista (01/23/14 10:02 AM)


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Hilmi
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Reged: 03/07/10

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Re: Buying a telescope...how important is the mount? new [Re: Jon Rista]
      #6330246 - 01/23/14 10:12 AM

Software is another matter. One thing at a time. Which software depends on many things.

Sequence Generator Pro has been getting a lot of attention lately for image acquisition as it does almost all the automation stuff and is very cheap for it's capabilities.

For image processing the current hotest trending program is Pixinsight. Nasty user interface, but once you get around it the results you can produce using that software are nothing short of stunning.

Personally, I don't use Sequence Generator Pro because I had already invested in MaximDL/CCDAutopilot Combo. Also, MaximDL is the program supported by most other programs as it has been around for ages and has sort of become the defacto standard for scripting and automation. I would still recommend SGP though, simply because it would do more than you would ever want to do for the first few years and is far more affordable than MaximDL.

MaximDL contains processing, but very few people use it for processing as the results are far superior with PixInsight.


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David PavlichAdministrator
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Reged: 05/18/05

Loc: Mandeville, LA USA
Re: Buying a telescope...how important is the mount? new [Re: Hilmi]
      #6330324 - 01/23/14 10:58 AM

Before you get too much money wrapped up in imaging, you might consider looking for a used Celestron CGE and something like a used triplet refractor like a Stellarvue or William Optics in the 110-120mm aperture. Get a good guide scope like a Borg mini 50 in solid rings, not guide rings, a good guide camera, hook up your MkIII with a laptop and Nebulosity for acquisition and PHD Guiding to keep the mount in place and see if you like imaging.

Then there's processing the images. To begin with, Deep Sky Stacker for pre-processing and I'm guessing that you already have Photoshop. Look online for tutorials on processing and make some pictures!

Once you find out that imaging is just too cool, then you can look at Mach 1s or MXs, Ritcheys, Hyperstars, etc, etc. Mid sized refractors take nice images and are very forgiving and a great platform to learn this part of the hobby.

David


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WadeH237
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Reged: 02/24/07

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Re: Buying a telescope...how important is the mount? new [Re: Hilmi]
      #6330335 - 01/23/14 11:02 AM

This is an interesting thread, with lots of good advice. For what it's worth, here are my thoughts:

There's been lots of mention of Hyperstar. You already have a 600mm F/4 APO refractor in that Canon lens. Hyperstar isn't going to get you anything significant that you can't do with that lens.

You've mentioned the AT6RC scope at $400. I think that's a great idea. I've got one and it's lots of fun to use - one of the better bargains in astrophotography. It's 1360mm focal length is a nice next step from your 600mm lens.

The 3 most important things in astrophotography are the mount, the mount and the mount. You are on the right track thinking about the Mach1. You should also look at the AP1100 (the Mach1's bigger brother), the Paramount MX and the 10Micron GM1000hps. Any of these mounts will serve you quite well.

That said, the are many successful astrophotographers that are perfectly happy with CGEMs, Atlases, etc. If you have budget constraints and are not sure that you are committed to the hobby (it can be hard to know until you actually try it), they make good entry level imaging mounts. And they can easily carry your Canon lens and DSLR.

Some of us get pretty carried away when we're spending other people's money. It's really easy to recommend premium mounts when we're not the ones footing the bill. To be sure, you do get what you pay for with them. And if you end up getting bitten by the astro imaging bug, you can save money by jumping in at the deep end instead of buying cheaper equipment first and upgrading.

Of the mounts listed here, the only one I would tend to avoid is the CGE Pro. This is not anything against the mount. I've used them and they are fine mounts. But for your stated goals, they are big and heavy (really huge, in fact). For the extra money, you'd be better off getting a premium mount with a bit less capacity, given what you are trying to do.

I hope that this is helpful,
-Wade


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dawziecat
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Re: Buying a telescope...how important is the mount? new [Re: Jon Rista]
      #6330429 - 01/23/14 11:46 AM

Quote:


OOH! How in the world did you get an SBIG mounted on there!? SBIG cams are on the top of my list once I get the mount and scope. If I can mount an SBIG right to the 600mm f/4, wow, I'd be one ecstatically happy dude!




There are other ways to mount a CCD to a Canon EF lens but SBIG are one of the few that make it really easy. SBIG EOS Lens Adapter.


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Whichwayisnorth
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Re: Buying a telescope...how important is the mount? new [Re: Jon Rista]
      #6330463 - 01/23/14 11:55 AM

Quote:

Thanks Spacetravelerx! Everyone seems to have pretty good things to say about the Mach1GTO...I think that puppy is at the top of my list right now. I am hoping more opinions roll in through the day...I'm interested in hearing what others have to say, see what other options there may be.

I'd looked at the Meade LX850 mount before. It seems to be pretty much on par with the Celestron CGE Pro, almost point for point. I've also seen the CGE Pro slew a big 14" EdgeHD around like it was nothing...so I am pretty sure it could handle the 90lb weight as well. I used to love Meade as a kid, but lately it seems they have a number of problems, including legal issues? Anyway, I decided a while ago that I was going to avoid Meade...just doesn't seem like a safe company over the long term, in case I ever need replacement parts or whatnot. I have a bit of an affinity for Celestron these days anyway, I think.

As for Apple, not gonna happen with me. I can't stand apple products, and that isn't for a lack of using them, either...I have reluctantly had to use them a lot. I've had multiple generations of iPhone, iPads, even a brand new Retina MacBook just a few months back. Never liked Apple products, don't think I ever will. They just don't jive with the way I do things. Not to mention the fact that a Surface Pro 2 is a far more capable device than an iPad will ever be, with stellar battery life to boot (thing can go for like 15 hours.) My whole entire house is Microsoft now that I've expunged all Apple products... ;P Only seems logical to stick with it now. I just have to light a fire under Starry Night and Redshift and whoever else develops that kind of software and get em moving on Windows 8 updates.

Regarding observing, just so everyone knows...it will all be away from my home for the foreseeable future. I live pretty close the the outskirts of the Denver metropolitan area in Colorado. If I drive a bit over the speed limit, I can get to some VERY dark skies (albeit with two bubbles of LP on the southern and western horizons) within 50 minutes. In Bortle Scale terms, probably zones 2-3 (rural dark to true dark). If I drive for two to three hours, I can find exceptionally dark sights. It's one of the better things about Colorado...we don't have to travel half the country to find truly dark skies. Denver metro and Colorado Springs are the main LP regions...move east for an hour, or move west for two hours, and you can find REALLY DARK skies. Some of those dark skies are up at 11,000 feet or more, so the air can be incredibly crisp and clear and clean...seeing is pretty darn good up on the western side of the divide.




I really like you and hope you post more often.


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Spacetravelerx
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 12/23/12

Loc: New Mexico
Re: Buying a telescope...how important is the mount? new [Re: Jon Rista]
      #6330508 - 01/23/14 12:09 PM

Quote:

Thanks Spacetravelerx! Everyone seems to have pretty good things to say about the Mach1GTO...I think that puppy is at the top of my list right now. I am hoping more opinions roll in through the day...I'm interested in hearing what others have to say, see what other options there may be.

I'd looked at the Meade LX850 mount before. It seems to be pretty much on par with the Celestron CGE Pro, almost point for point. I've also seen the CGE Pro slew a big 14" EdgeHD around like it was nothing...so I am pretty sure it could handle the 90lb weight as well. I used to love Meade as a kid, but lately it seems they have a number of problems, including legal issues? Anyway, I decided a while ago that I was going to avoid Meade...just doesn't seem like a safe company over the long term, in case I ever need replacement parts or whatnot. I have a bit of an affinity for Celestron these days anyway, I think.

As for Apple, not gonna happen with me. I can't stand apple products, and that isn't for a lack of using them, either...I have reluctantly had to use them a lot. I've had multiple generations of iPhone, iPads, even a brand new Retina MacBook just a few months back. Never liked Apple products, don't think I ever will. They just don't jive with the way I do things. Not to mention the fact that a Surface Pro 2 is a far more capable device than an iPad will ever be, with stellar battery life to boot (thing can go for like 15 hours.) My whole entire house is Microsoft now that I've expunged all Apple products... ;P Only seems logical to stick with it now. I just have to light a fire under Starry Night and Redshift and whoever else develops that kind of software and get em moving on Windows 8 updates.

Regarding observing, just so everyone knows...it will all be away from my home for the foreseeable future. I live pretty close the the outskirts of the Denver metropolitan area in Colorado. If I drive a bit over the speed limit, I can get to some VERY dark skies (albeit with two bubbles of LP on the southern and western horizons) within 50 minutes. In Bortle Scale terms, probably zones 2-3 (rural dark to true dark). If I drive for two to three hours, I can find exceptionally dark sights. It's one of the better things about Colorado...we don't have to travel half the country to find truly dark skies. Denver metro and Colorado Springs are the main LP regions...move east for an hour, or move west for two hours, and you can find REALLY DARK skies. Some of those dark skies are up at 11,000 feet or more, so the air can be incredibly crisp and clear and clean...seeing is pretty darn good up on the western side of the divide.





Jon,

Based on your observing information I would just go with the Mach1GTO, your cameras and an APO and drive into the mountains. My variation is the AP1100, but I will be traveling with the LX850 until the AP arrives (the LX850 will eventually go in an observatory).

Meade is legally and financially fine. There should be no issues there - there certainly have been none for myself with Meade. Great folks over there and fun to work with!

As far as Apple-Windows goes that is I guess one of those religious things, though we have 100% expunged Windows from our work, and for our flight programs so have our customers. We have many issues with the Surface Pro 2 and it is banned (so are the Android tablets, but for different reasons), but your mileage may vary. Our team and customers are really sold on the MacOS and iOS and we could not get rid of Windows fast enough. Other development for our side is on the ARM based processors and Linux which is fun. But that is a whole different topic.

Final verdict for me - Mach1GTO to the mountains! You can throw that thing in a backpack easily!


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Starhawk
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Re: Buying a telescope...how important is the mount? new [Re: Spacetravelerx]
      #6330594 - 01/23/14 12:44 PM

I'd be interested in how well the camera lens does as an astrograph. Astrophotography is a significantly harsher critic than daylight photography, so remember to remain calm, no matter what you see.

The AP Mach 1 GTO is a lifetime travel mount- you'll want to get an accessory for it called RAPAS for quick setup.

Please keep in mind what you are proposing is an extreme learning curve. Good astrophotos require taking lots of bad astrophotos. What you have learned in daylight will not help you. At all.

If you get a really good mount from the start, you will at least avoid the brutal lesson on how there just is no substitute for a good mount. Some things to keep in mind:

Many of the really interesting DSOs are enormous- on the order of 6 full moons across if you are talking about the andromeda galaxy or the rosette nebula. Photographing things like the Horsehead, M42, or the Pleiades are likewise all wide-field imaging targets. This is good, since low magnifications are forgiving while you learn to hyper-dial in alignment, and you can simply forego guiding.

Don't expect success early- what you are embarking on is very, very, very difficult. People who master this are about as numerous as people who have flown in space- don't expect this to be easy.


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Starhawk
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Re: Buying a telescope...how important is the mount? new [Re: Spacetravelerx]
      #6330595 - 01/23/14 12:44 PM

I'd be interested in how well the camera lens does as an astrograph. Astrophotography is a significantly harsher critic than daylight photography, so remember to remain calm, no matter what you see.

The AP Mach 1 GTO is a lifetime travel mount- you'll want to get an accessory for it called RAPAS for quick setup.

Please keep in mind what you are proposing is an extreme learning curve. Good astrophotos require taking lots of bad astrophotos. What you have learned in daylight will not help you. At all.

If you get a really good mount from the start, you will at least avoid the brutal lesson on how there just is no substitute for a good mount. Some things to keep in mind:

Many of the really interesting DSOs are enormous- on the order of 6 full moons across if you are talking about the andromeda galaxy or the rosette nebula. Photographing things like the Horsehead, M42, or the Pleiades are likewise all wide-field imaging targets. This is good, since low magnifications are forgiving while you learn to hyper-dial in alignment, and you can simply forego guiding.

Don't expect success early- what you are embarking on is very, very, very difficult. People who master this are about as numerous as people who have flown in space- don't expect this to be easy.

-Rich


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gary-sue69
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Reged: 07/19/07

Loc: Maybee MI.
Re: Buying a telescope...how important is the mount? new [Re: Spacetravelerx]
      #6330619 - 01/23/14 12:55 PM

Hi. I like the Mead LX 850 not the 800. they had a lot of trouble with the LX 800 which I had. I really did like it but to many bugs. Meade was great to offer me to wait for the fixes. or my money back. I went with money back. But and a big BUT in short I love the technology behind it. So this time instead of the LX 850 which I think is a great Mount. I am going with the Meade LX 600 14' on a wedged. but it will be in an observatory. This is their web site. http://meade.com/lx850 good luck.

Edited by gary-sue69 (01/23/14 01:29 PM)


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Jon Rista
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 01/10/14

Loc: Colorado
Re: Buying a telescope...how important is the mount? new [Re: Whichwayisnorth]
      #6330668 - 01/23/14 01:17 PM

Quote:

I really like you and hope you post more often.




Well, thanks! Appreciate that. I do intend to stick around...I've had intentions of doing astrophotography for a very long time, just either never had the time or the funds. Now, I should have some of both on a fairly regular basis, and I've always learned a lot on these forums, even before I was a member.


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