Return to the Cloudy Nights Telescope Reviews home page


Observing >> Solar System Observing

Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | (show all)
Paul R.
professor emeritus


Reged: 04/08/07

Loc: Northern Illinois
Re: Recent Image of Jupiter from Dec. 6th. new [Re: azure1961p]
      #6248087 - 12/11/13 11:15 PM

Exactly Pete...the person who composed this image is well versed in this specific exercise. I do not know how to more clearly state that this is COMPLETELY by memory with only the assistance of Photoshop as the tool of choice.

I forgot two other points to make. First of all it should be known that the sky was not extremely clear. There was actually an extremely thin stratus layer of clouds that actually *improved* the view by acting as a very opaque filter minimizing the overt glare of which usually inhibits visual acuity while observing such a bright object like Jupiter.

I also wanted to point out to those *doubting Thomas* whom still think this is an actual image or photograph, that if it WAS a photograph, do you think you could image its satellites at their apparent distances utilizing the focal length you would need to render such planetary/image scale?

NO...

This is a drawing entirely from memory composed by a brilliant artist of an experience in where everything that could go right in fact actually did.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Asbytec
Guy in a furry hat
*****

Reged: 08/08/07

Loc: La Union, PI
Re: Recent Image of Jupiter from Dec. 6th. new [Re: Paul R.]
      #6248178 - 12/12/13 12:22 AM

Quote:

I don't think there's an intent of deception at all here by any party. It IS a fine example of max detail through an 8" aperture though.




Yea, Pete, there's no conspiracy here. And the level of detail visible in a good 8" is astounding on a good night and easily resembles the initial smaller scale image. And it can be sketched, very likely perfectly by a skilled artist and observer.

My doubting Thomas lies only in the level of finer low contrast detail seen in places it can't be seen, such as near the limb, despite the conditions, the instrument, and the observer. Some of it can't be seen, yet it appears in the sketch. This speaks to a rapidly outdated and precise memory being updated that night or the use of an image to get every bit of minutia that the eye will miss. Only then can it be observed and sketched in.

Anyway, I am not trying to steal anyone's thunder. Again, it's a very inspiring piece of work for me, personally, as a digital sketcher. I just want to know how the sketch was rendered, this level of fine low contrast detail is beyond a 30 minute view in the eyepiece. That's all I'm saying. Everything else is fine.

Quote:

The attached is an image of Jupiter a close friend of mine composed during a recent, all night observing session.




It's not worth beating into the ground to set the record straight on how such a fine, highly detailed sketch was achieved. Again, his illustration of Neptune is even more stunning, but that was not an telescopic observation on a fine night with a flawless instrument, either.

Anyway, I do appreciate Paul posting the sketch. It's beautiful in it's own right. With that, that's my final word on the subject...hopefully.

Edited by Asbytec (12/12/13 12:35 AM)


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
azure1961p
Postmaster
*****

Reged: 01/17/09

Loc: USA
Re: Recent Image of Jupiter from Dec. 6th. new [Re: Paul R.]
      #6248218 - 12/12/13 01:02 AM

Quote:

Exactly Pete...the person who composed this image is well versed in this specific exercise. I do not know how to more clearly state that this is COMPLETELY by memory with only the assistance of Photoshop as the tool of choice.

I forgot two other points to make. First of all it should be known that the sky was not extremely clear. There was actually an extremely thin stratus layer of clouds that actually *improved* the view by acting as a very opaque filter minimizing the overt glare of which usually inhibits visual acuity while observing such a bright object like Jupiter.

I also wanted to point out to those *doubting Thomas* whom still think this is an actual image or photograph, that if it WAS a photograph, do you think you could image its satellites at their apparent distances utilizing the focal length you would need to render such planetary/image scale?

NO...

This is a drawing entirely from memory composed by a brilliant artist of an experience in where everything that could go right in fact actually did.




Paul no one can get that many points if detail correct by memory. I'm an artist too my friend and none too shabby. You can't do that from memory or in realtime and have that much threshold detail accurately placed.

Again though - opinions were asked - and were given. Don't be hatin'!!!

Pete


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
azure1961p
Postmaster
*****

Reged: 01/17/09

Loc: USA
Re: Recent Image of Jupiter from Dec. 6th. new [Re: Paul R.]
      #6248223 - 12/12/13 01:07 AM

Quote:

Quote:

. When you can see detail in the GRS you've got a good night and good equipment.




AND I might add..do you not only see it's satellites as distinct discs, but also to discern variations in size! The image ALSO depicts this experience of that night. With that comfortable, high performance Delos eyepiece, it truly was like looking out an open window into space. I LOVE when that happens which is almost never around here! UGH...




You'd also see Io smaller than he drew it and Ganymede would certainly have shown details.

Pete


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
CPellier
scholastic sledgehammer


Reged: 08/07/10

Re: Recent Image of Jupiter from Dec. 6th. new [Re: Paul R.]
      #6248735 - 12/12/13 10:40 AM

Quote:

Nice attempts, good detail and information, but extremely amateur in comparison...

Adolf Schaller is hands down the Franz Liszt of astronomical artists today...NO ONE comes even close man! (that I know of anyway)




The comparison is not relevant. Burgeot and Biver's drawings are astronomical views of the planets, I mean realistic. You can actually compare them with true CCD images if you find some (I did the comparison several times) . Schaller's paintings are purely artistical and imaginary (no critic here). The purpose is just not the same.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
stanislas-jean
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 10/22/08

Re: Recent Image of Jupiter from Dec. 6th. new [Re: CPellier]
      #6248748 - 12/12/13 10:48 AM

Fully agree.
A document with data (in other words data measured) is not a paint.
Stanislas-Jean


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
nirvanix
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 06/07/07

Loc: Saskatoon, SK
Re: Recent Image of Jupiter from Dec. 6th. new [Re: azure1961p]
      #6248786 - 12/12/13 11:04 AM

Quote:


Paul no one can get that many points if detail correct by memory. I'm an artist too my friend and none too shabby. You can't do that from memory or in realtime and have that much threshold detail accurately placed.

Again though - opinions were asked - and were given. Don't be hatin'!!!

Pete




I'd have to disagree here. I saw a documentary about a young man in Europe with just such an incredible talent. He was flown over Paris in a helicopter for about a half hour then set to work on a large canvas reproducing every single detail that his eyes took in on that flyover. Every window, brick, nook and cranny on every building, and all other details were reproduced in his rendering without omission or error. Such is the human mind - at least some of them!

I think his name is Stephen Wiltshire.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Asbytec
Guy in a furry hat
*****

Reged: 08/08/07

Loc: La Union, PI
Re: Recent Image of Jupiter from Dec. 6th. new [Re: nirvanix]
      #6248864 - 12/12/13 11:37 AM

There are differences between observations and art. This is great art and many observers, especially me, are not world class artists. They do have different purposes but both often involve sketches.

No doubt some human capabilities are simply astounding. Such talent could manifest as memory, art, or observing. Rarely do such skills come in bunches. Its possible someone could remember every nook and crany of Paris. But only if he can see it.

The op is a world class illustration, but not an observation through an 8" even though at a glance it looks like what a good 8" will show. Its a memorable night spent with a close, talented friend and a very nice scope under ideal conditions. Its a great story and a memory to cherish culminating in a wonderful illustration many of us mistook for an image.

Edited by Asbytec (12/13/13 06:10 AM)


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
David Gray
sage
*****

Reged: 08/06/12

Loc: Co. Durham UK
Re: Recent Image of Jupiter from Dec. 6th. new [Re: nirvanix]
      #6248907 - 12/12/13 12:02 PM

Quote:

Quote:


Paul no one can get that many points if detail correct by memory. I'm an artist too my friend and none too shabby. You can't do that from memory or in realtime and have that much threshold detail accurately placed.



Again though - opinions were asked - and were given. Don't be hatin'!!!

Pete




I'd have to disagree here. I saw a documentary about a young man in Europe with just such an incredible talent. He was flown over Paris in a helicopter for about a half hour then set to work on a large canvas reproducing every single detail that his eyes took in on that flyover. Every window, brick, nook and cranny on every building, and all other details were reproduced in his rendering without omission or error. Such is the human mind - at least some of them!

I think his name is Stephen Wiltshire.




Yes saw him on TV too - some years ago.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Wiltshire

Cheers.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Paul R.
professor emeritus


Reged: 04/08/07

Loc: Northern Illinois
Re: Recent Image of Jupiter from Dec. 6th. new [Re: CPellier]
      #6248963 - 12/12/13 12:29 PM

Quote:

Quote:

Nice attempts, good detail and information, but extremely amateur in comparison...

Adolf Schaller is hands down the Franz Liszt of astronomical artists today...NO ONE comes even close man! (that I know of anyway)




The comparison is not relevant. Burgeot and Biver's drawings are astronomical Schaller's paintings are purely artistical and imaginary (no critic here). The purpose is just not the same.




Oh geezz, crack me up..Did you happen to even LOOK at the original image in this thread? You are going to tell me that its not realistic? You couldn't have as if you did, then you've never seen reality...

Evidently you have clue what you're talking about. Or, it is possible that I don't understand your point. Schaller's impressions are premised in scientific accuracy. This has been his forte since his beginnings with the Cosmos series dating back to 1979. I can only assume that you've never seen his work, and certainly not the image in this thread!

Those other sketches that were posted in thread, if that is what you are referring to, and designed to illustrate actual, or empirical information. I get that. Schaller's are as well..and intended to not only ACCURATELY describe empirically the observation, but to look as real as possible. Is being 'artistic' not being 'realistic'? Is THAT what you are trying to convey? Are we going to now discuss semantics with respect to the word 'artistic'? Schaller's motivations FIRST for the creation of this image was to accurately describe how Jupiter really looked that night. And let me tell you IT DOES. Are you going to tell me that because it doesn't look 'cartoonish' like those other Jupiter drawings (in comparison) that it simply cannot be accurate? NUTS! Of course it can and it does..and is far greater in all aspects then those other drawings PRECISELY because it appears real! Others here continue to doubt that the detail as shown couldn't possibly have been created from memory. That's nuts! That's synonymous with someone telling you what you are seeing when its in direct contradiction to what YOU KNOW you are seeing. I HATE that notion. Its ignorant.

Sorry for the rant...that post struck an F#m with me..a key of aggression.

Edited by Paul R. (12/12/13 01:23 PM)


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
CPellier
scholastic sledgehammer


Reged: 08/07/10

Re: Recent Image of Jupiter from Dec. 6th. new [Re: Paul R.]
      #6249113 - 12/12/13 01:45 PM

Don't go mad at me, it was by no mean an agression . The picture on the front page is indeed realistic in the sense that it reproduce quite closely the visual feeling at the eyepiece.
But his other painting you can see on the web are on the pure artistic views (again this is not a critic word). I was reacting in comparisons with those paintings.
Burgeot and Biver try to render all possible details they see at the eyepiece, more the way would do a CCD camera with processing. In that sense they are scientific, but not artistic, and do not pretend to render the view at the eyepiece. But they are accurate considering the reality of details, and the rendering of colors (especially Burgeot's)


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
stanislas-jean
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 10/22/08

Re: Recent Image of Jupiter from Dec. 6th. new [Re: Paul R.]
      #6249258 - 12/12/13 02:42 PM

It is always some risks to employ some software for generating drawings, sketches at the eyepiece.
Your picture of your 1st post is a little too soft, not representing what is seen at an eyepiece with moltened features of different colors of different contrasts and different intensities right located.
Precisely these are these aspects in the report that are interresting to note in order to catch data for location on the disk, photometry of features in different color channels or even in white light.
The picture is beautiful but not enough realistic of what there is on.
I would say this is a warm picture for sure but a "cold " picture is rather needed for studies. This is a difficult exercise to be undertaken in diffrent manners with regards to the subject to be studied.
The reinforcement of the contrasts is not a problem, respect of the scaling of the contrasts or the tones is more the subject to be respected.
A lot of factors are influencing this scaling, the observer and the scope in use for a first approach.
On a tiny disk we try to perform astrometry and photometry applied on features so small in order to collect data.
How to represent the tiny contrasts of Uranus of about 1-2% levels on a sketch, features at the right location with the actual contrast scaling? Similar for Venus, also Mars to-day on the un-featured zone seen this morning, etc...
Personally I make all at the eyepiece, no draft, for avoiding modifications later.
I knew in past a swiss observer with no ability to draw, but his sketches were acurate, with the right locations, adequate tones scaling. Features were only lines, dots, circle curves,..., basic shapes only. Data collected gave the best drift charts of features on Jupiter. Just matter of methodology and methods in use for measurement performance.
Stanislas-Jean


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Asbytec
Guy in a furry hat
*****

Reged: 08/08/07

Loc: La Union, PI
Re: Recent Image of Jupiter from Dec. 6th. new [Re: stanislas-jean]
      #6249942 - 12/12/13 09:34 PM

Quote:

...and intended to not only ACCURATELY describe empirically the observation, but to look as real as possible...Schaller's motivations FIRST for the creation of this image was to accurately describe how Jupiter really looked that night. And let me tell you IT DOES.



It does, absolutely resemble Jupiter in an 8" scope when you look at his sketch. No doubt. I observe Jupiter almost nightly in excellent seeing - religiously, metaphorically and literally speaking. I can vouch for the appearance of the sketch, it is as you say. At a glance, it is the most accurate, beautiful, and realistic sketch I have seen of Jupiter by anybody.

You experienced a wonderful, and most memorable night with Jupiter and a close friend. I get that and believe you and am happy for you without condition. It's a wonderful story. The rub is when you assert the OP sketch was what was seen that night. It more resembles an image (per the OP challenge to distinguish the difference) with the level of fine low contrast detail and hues rendered beyond the cursory appearance of the sketch.

On closer inspection there are features that, I'm sorry, just cannot be seen to that level of accuracy in terms of hues portrayed and the positions plotted. Yet these features are included in the sketch accurately and with the proper hues (or close enough). This means it was certainly a sketch, a wonderful illustration, but not an observation of Jupiter on that night. In this sense it looses it's realism as an observation but excels with realism as an illustration. Few people could produce such fine work.

The other observations above are far more realistic in terms of being the type of sketch made by an observer during an observation. They lack the beauty of the OP, but they accurately portray what an observer will render. And, in this sense, they are quite good and more realistic as a sketch accompanying an observation by a planetary observer at the eyepiece.

So, it is a sketch, we can appreciate that immensely. But it was not a sketch made at the eyepiece. It was assisted in some way. However, this in no way detracts from it's beauty and scientific accuracy, it's just not realistic in what was seen at the eyepiece that night by anybody.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Paul R.
professor emeritus


Reged: 04/08/07

Loc: Northern Illinois
Re: Recent Image of Jupiter from Dec. 6th. new [Re: Asbytec]
      #6250142 - 12/13/13 12:05 AM

Quote:

Quote:

...and intended to not only ACCURATELY describe empirically the observation, but to look as real as possible...Schaller's motivations FIRST for the creation of this image was to accurately describe how Jupiter really looked that night. And let me tell you IT DOES.



It does, absolutely resemble Jupiter in an 8" scope when you look at his sketch. No doubt. I observe Jupiter almost nightly in excellent seeing - religiously, metaphorically and literally speaking. I can vouch for the appearance of the sketch, it is as you say. At a glance, it is the most accurate, beautiful, and realistic sketch I have seen of Jupiter by anybody.

You experienced a wonderful, and most memorable night with Jupiter and a close friend. I get that and believe you and am happy for you without condition. It's a wonderful story. The rub is when you assert the OP sketch was what was seen that night. It more resembles an image (per the OP challenge to distinguish the difference) with the level of fine low contrast detail and hues rendered beyond the cursory appearance of the sketch.

On closer inspection there are features that, I'm sorry, just cannot be seen to that level of accuracy in terms of hues portrayed and the positions plotted. Yet these features are included in the sketch accurately and with the proper hues (or close enough). This means it was certainly a sketch, a wonderful illustration, but not an observation of Jupiter on that night. In this sense it looses it's realism as an observation but excels with realism as an illustration. Few people could produce such fine work.

The other observations above are far more realistic in terms of being the type of sketch made by an observer during an observation. They lack the beauty of the OP, but they accurately portray what an observer will render. And, in this sense, they are quite good and more realistic as a sketch accompanying an observation by a planetary observer at the eyepiece.

So, it is a sketch, we can appreciate that immensely. But it was not a sketch made at the eyepiece. It was assisted in some way. However, this in no way detracts from it's beauty and scientific accuracy, it's just not realistic in what was seen at the eyepiece that night by anybody.




UGH..LOL...You win...


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Asbytec
Guy in a furry hat
*****

Reged: 08/08/07

Loc: La Union, PI
Re: Recent Image of Jupiter from Dec. 6th. new [Re: Paul R.]
      #6250152 - 12/13/13 12:18 AM

LOL...not about winning Paul, I'm just a little over anal retentive on the record of how that wonderful sketch came about and whether it was an image or a sketch since you asked. My apologies for being a retentive Jupiter observer, you know...I wish I was that good at rendering Jupiter.

Plus, being a moderate, it's easy to see all sides of a story...the other half of the story, cuz moderates are in the middle. But, it comes at a price of alienating almost everyone else. I run into this all the time, this guy and that guy are both right.

You actually win having a wonderful experience that night. Observing alone, I do not get to share those great moments with someone knowledgeable and appreciative of what we see. Cherish the moment, I congratulate you.

My Regards,
A moderate, anal retentive Jupiter observer who can't sketch that well...

Edited by Asbytec (12/13/13 12:24 AM)


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
nirvanix
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 06/07/07

Loc: Saskatoon, SK
Re: Recent Image of Jupiter from Dec. 6th. new [Re: Asbytec]
      #6250159 - 12/13/13 12:30 AM

Quote:


On closer inspection there are features that, I'm sorry, just cannot be seen to that level of accuracy in terms of hues portrayed and the positions plotted. Yet these features are included in the sketch accurately and with the proper hues (or close enough). This means it was certainly a sketch, a wonderful illustration, but not an observation of Jupiter on that night. In this sense it looses it's realism as an observation but excels with realism as an illustration. Few people could produce such fine work.




It seems what you're really saying is that you've never seen this level of detail and color hue at the eyepiece so no one else has? I state with complete sincerity that every detail and hue in that sketch and more I've been able to observe in an excellent large aperature dob on nights of great seeing.

As for finishing the sketch, I'm no artist but it seems like there could be work done after the observing to achieve the quality represented?


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Asbytec
Guy in a furry hat
*****

Reged: 08/08/07

Loc: La Union, PI
Re: Recent Image of Jupiter from Dec. 6th. new [Re: nirvanix]
      #6250165 - 12/13/13 12:39 AM Attachment (5 downloads)

Quote:

[It seems what you're really saying is that you've never seen this level of detail and color hue at the eyepiece so no one else has? I state with complete sincerity that every detail and hue in that sketch and more I've been able to observe in an excellent large aperture dob on nights of great seeing.




Yes, I am saying I have never seen such a level of detail in a 6" aperture, close enough to an 8" aperture, and I have diffraction limited seeing and much experience with Jupiter. I am highly doubtful anyone can see such things, such as that oval in the north (LRS-1) on the preceding limb. Both in real world experience and theoretically, it's very likely not possible to observe that object in that location and get the hues almost perfect as well as it's position. Yes. And a plethora of other low contrast, small details that show in the sketch, as well, which give it an image like quality. Only an image can deliver that level of resolution, very unlikely visual can deliver it.

I have a challenge for you with a modest aperture of 6" to 8 inches. Observe oval BA and tell me what you see. Or sketch it. Oval BA is currently embedded in darker cloud. I nearly blew an eyeball out just to see it at all, it's much harder than last year. If you can sketch that much larger feature accurately, even on the central meridian, with hue and position being even close, to include the outer darker cloud structure with as much clarity as the oval feature on the northern limb, I will publicly eat crow and hand bathe your feet. And I like my crow best served cold, please.

Quote:

...so no one else has?



I learned long ago never to tell people what they can nor cannot see. I avoid that by classifying objects, such as that northern oval, as to whether they are likely to be seen or not in a given aperture. This one might present itself as, more or less, a dim smudge on the meridian in an 8" scope. Detectable? Yea, okay, maybe so. Put it on the limb and the probability of detection drops considerably. Expecting to see hue and structure on the limb of an already low contrast oval, the probability drops so low as to have practically a zero chance of observing it that well in a modest aperture by anybody, including myself. Observe the larger oval BA feature and see for yourself how difficult it is on the meridian then estimate how much more difficult this small northern oval will be on the limb.

I am talking about the detail extracted from the sketch below, primarily that oval which is exactly where it should be according to images of that same date and time. It is all over the OP image, even in the GRS trailing wake. No way. But again, this detail is what gives his sketch that admirable and inspiring image-like quality. It just wasn't done from the eyepiece, that's all.

Edited by Asbytec (12/13/13 04:07 AM)


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
stanislas-jean
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 10/22/08

Re: Recent Image of Jupiter from Dec. 6th. new [Re: Asbytec]
      #6250268 - 12/13/13 04:05 AM

I think this is very optimistic views.
Frankly, this is not what is captured at the eyepiece.
In an 8" on fix images you get so many details on diffrent tones and colors, and sizes with different shapes, etc...
I think you will convince us when the data collected will be compared with others. I donot speak about the locations of the features on one sketch but on a serie performed on a period in order to draw drift charts, tones/ contrast variation charts because we draw or image features for collecting data and then data over a year of observation, over a synodic period of a planet, so for trying to get long term variations and data that represents the planet itself with its own characteristics.
That is an other story. Until this such exercise is not achieved, this is simple curiosity.
In the clubs here the tendency is to show pictures of planets on showrooms as we can visit exposition of paints. This is interresting for making some vocation to be astronomer or simple amateur but this bring no data for construction.
Every thing is done with strong efforts and not for free and sometimes.
Frankly in a respectable 8" there are more details strongly more contrasted.
Stanislas-Jean


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
nirvanix
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 06/07/07

Loc: Saskatoon, SK
Re: Recent Image of Jupiter from Dec. 6th. new [Re: stanislas-jean]
      #6250330 - 12/13/13 06:17 AM

Asbytec, it seems to me you are saying the sketch was made from (or augmented from) looking at photo? Well, I wasn't there so I can't speak to that.

If the artist had provided a sketch like this I'd tend to agree!

jupiter


As for me, I'm one of those folks that can see the phases of Venus naked eye, but not sure if that translates to a better view at the eyepiece. Seems probable. If you look at that link I provided, you'll notice how the GRS goes from tan to rust in the center, but also that there is a darker brown splotchy/whirly pattern overlayed - well I've noted that at the eyepiece. It's very subtle but it's there. I always assumed everyone could see what I was seeing, maybe not.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Asbytec
Guy in a furry hat
*****

Reged: 08/08/07

Loc: La Union, PI
Re: Recent Image of Jupiter from Dec. 6th. new [Re: nirvanix]
      #6250430 - 12/13/13 08:23 AM

Or memory, he reported has a great familiarity with Jupiter. That's totally understandable. But, yes, Jupiter looks much like the sketch originally posted, until you get right up and close. From there, it's probably an artists rendition. But that was the unclear part, how much of that sketch looked exactly like Jupiter? All of it?

I cannot see Venus as crescent with the unaided eye. Not sure why, never really tried. But it's just not there. Its way too bright, too much irradiance. So, yea, some folks have great perception and others less.

It's not difficult to notice some variations in hue within the GRS, but to notice some specific hues and some patterns is within reach with nice eyeballs and some aperture. Some folks can do it in a six inch, I cannot lock down those different hues into any specific pattern or swirl. So, that you can and I have difficulty highlights differences between observers and instruments (and conditions, too.) That's why differences between observers is so hard to pin down and talk with absolutes, as you know.

Seriously, though, next time you catch oval BA report back. I'd be curious to know how well it can be seen in your 10". No doubt better than my smaller scope, but how much better. It's one tough cookie right now making LRS-1 even tougher and likely beyond reach until aperture is sufficiently large. I'd love to know if you can grab LRS-1. I'd imagine you can away from the limb. I doubt a 6" could really get anything other than a faint, fleeting, indistinct smudge at best on the meridian. An 8" a little more. A 10" should do it a even easier. But how about hue and structure?

Anyway, I feel something like a heel in this thread. As a planetary observer I love discussing observations of Jove. I was intrigued and inspired by this guy's technique and wondered how he pulled off such a detailed sketch. So, I dug a little deep into it...and just think it's a wonderful sketch if not embellished with some sharp memory or maybe an image. If so, there is nothing wrong with that. It's scientifically accurate art.

To me, the real story is the wonderful evening spent with a great instrument in excellent conditions with a close friend and shared interests. That's so cool. One can imagine a cup of coffee sitting by the fireplace enjoying a few chuckles.

By the way, WOW! That image...did you do that in a 10"? (In jest... )

Edited by Asbytec (12/13/13 09:07 AM)


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | (show all)


Extra information
0 registered and 4 anonymous users are browsing this forum.

Moderator:  Rich (RLTYS), star drop, dr.who 

Print Thread

Forum Permissions
      You cannot start new topics
      You cannot reply to topics
      HTML is disabled
      UBBCode is enabled


Thread views: 1753

Jump to

CN Forums Home




Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics