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Otto Piechowski
Pooh-Bah


Reged: 09/20/05

Loc: Lexington, KY
Re: Dew new [Re: Jarad]
      #5993877 - 07/27/13 11:16 PM

That was an easy to understand and helpful explanation, Jarad.

I am curious about the word blackbody. I have heard that word use in association with heat and in association with quantum physics before, but I have never thought to ask; why do we refer to blackbodies when we are talking about heat? I suspect the word black doesn't (so much) refer to color as to a certain energy state, but I am only guessing.

Otto


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gavinm
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 08/26/05

Loc: Auckland New Zealand
Re: Dew new [Re: Otto Piechowski]
      #5993966 - 07/28/13 12:41 AM

Blackbody refers to an object where the colour of the light depends only on its temperature (as opposed to burning something like copper that is green because of electron transitions) - think of iron at a blacksmith - red hot, white hot etc

Stars are kind of blackbody (ie hot-blue, cool-red) but with lots of other things going on as well to complicate things..


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StarWars
Mr. Postmaster Man
*****

Reged: 11/26/03

Loc: At the Gym >Spudtastic<
Re: Dew new [Re: Otto Piechowski]
      #5995102 - 07/28/13 04:39 PM




Dew Point...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dew_point

The dewpoint temperature is the temperature at which the air can no longer "hold" all of the water vapor which is mixed with it, and some of the water vapor must condense into liquid water. The dew point is always lower than (or equal to) the air temperature.

If the air temperature cools to the dew point, or if the dew point rises to equal the air temperature, then dew, fog or clouds begin to form. At this point where the dew point temperature equals the air temperature, the relative humidity is 100%.


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Carl Coker
member


Reged: 07/30/12

Loc: Ohio
Re: Dew new [Re: Otto Piechowski]
      #6008048 - 08/05/13 05:51 PM

Quote:

That was an easy to understand and helpful explanation, Jarad.

I am curious about the word blackbody. I have heard that word use in association with heat and in association with quantum physics before, but I have never thought to ask; why do we refer to blackbodies when we are talking about heat? I suspect the word black doesn't (so much) refer to color as to a certain energy state, but I am only guessing.

Otto




We call them blackbodies because a perfect blackbody absorbs all radiation that hits it, so it is black by definition. Similarly, Black paint is black because it absorbs all visible light that hits it.


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