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Astrophotography and Sketching >> Sketching

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TenthEnemy
scholastic sledgehammer


Reged: 01/21/08

Loc: Maryland
Sun 1/3/10
      #3537190 - 01/03/10 01:56 PM Attachment (58 downloads)

I managed to catch a few details through the extremely poor seeing.

I don't like using graphite for surface features, so I'm looking for another medium that could work for the sun. My only idea is white conte and a circular stencil; I'd appreciate any other suggestions.


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frank5817
Postmaster
*****

Reged: 06/13/06

Loc: Illinois
Re: Sun 1/3/10 new [Re: TenthEnemy]
      #3538089 - 01/03/10 10:16 PM

TenthEnemy,

This certainly is an beautiful sketch.

Frank


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markseibold
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 01/19/08

Loc: Portland Oregon
Re: Sun 1/3/10 new [Re: TenthEnemy]
      #3538492 - 01/04/10 06:07 AM

Tenth

A most beautiful rendering of the sun in h-alpha! I thought it was a photograph at first. Can you indicate what medium you used (red pastel chalks?) and the size of the work? The page format of the paper and/or the circular disc diameter for the sun that you drew?

It reminds me of one of my earlier works that I produced in pastel of a solar prominence and active sunspot. It was April 26th 2007, also shown in Spaceweather on that archived date >
Marks Pastel Rendering of Solar Prominences and Active Sunspot Apr 26 2007

Keep up the great sketch work!

Mark
www.markseibold.com
My CN Gallery


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JayinUTModerator
I'm not Sleepy
*****

Reged: 09/19/08

Loc: Utah
Re: Sun 1/3/10 new [Re: markseibold]
      #3538621 - 01/04/10 09:01 AM

Tenth,

Stunning, very stunning and beautiful. Well done.


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TenthEnemy
scholastic sledgehammer


Reged: 01/21/08

Loc: Maryland
Re: Sun 1/3/10 new [Re: JayinUT]
      #3538916 - 01/04/10 12:56 PM

Thank you for the kind words everyone.

Mark,
It's an HB pencil on white paper. I inverted the sketch and changed the color to match the eyepiece view. The diameter of the sun on the page is just over six inches.

I just took a look at your solar sketches. I have not seen them until now, they are just as beautiful and inspiring as your sketches of the moon. I do indeed have a red pastel, but I have not thought to try it, I'm going to pick up some larger paper before I do.


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CarlosEH
Postmaster
*****

Reged: 01/19/05

Loc: Pembroke Pines, Broward County...
Re: Sun 1/3/10 new [Re: TenthEnemy]
      #3538982 - 01/04/10 01:32 PM

TE,

An excellent and beautiful observation of the Sun. You have captured a good amount of detail over the surface of the Sun. Thank you for sharing it with us all.

Carlos


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markseibold
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 01/19/08

Loc: Portland Oregon
Re: Sun 1/3/10 new [Re: TenthEnemy]
      #3539482 - 01/04/10 06:09 PM

Tenth

That is impressive as to how you achieved such a red intensity in the graphite drawn image. Was this done in Photoshop? I can see the 'red over-ride' in the black background; a little ambient red light which is actually somewhat natural to observing in the eyepiece of an h-alpha telescope. I see my h-alpha image as somewhat red-orange. Closer to orange though.

Not that there is anything wrong with changing/altering the image electronically but I believe if we put the original image down in the actual colors observed, we may have the original interpretation from observation as more accurate. That is just my preference though. Plus, you have made an original artwork completed and suitable for framing or even to donate or sell in the name of science and art.

When you visit the art supply store, hopefully you have a large specialty art store, take a look at all the possibilities in materials and talk to the workers there, as more often than not, they are also artists, some professionals who exhibit and sell their work so they are experts in art materials, ie; using pastel chalks and many other mediums; oil paints, acrylics, etc. There are pastel pencils in a plethora of colors, perhaps several dozen if you prefer something close to working with graphite so this may be a nice transition for you. However the pencils have a hardening binder to hold the chalk well into the pencil wood wrap so it won’t crumble, in the covering so they are not the soft pastels like the chalk sticks and thus do not blend as easily.

The actual pastel chalk sticks in square and round are wide ranging in softness/hardness depending on the amount of binder and the quality of the pigments used. Some are almost like semi-wet oil paints. There might be a wall with slots holding several hundred colors! We think of the sun in only one tone of red in the h-alpha? Wait till you see that there are maybe 20 or 30 variations of red chalk colors! Another 30 oranges! And yes another several dozen whites for the moon. Then greys that range from warm to cool, blue-grey cold to brown-grey warm, to a dozen pale greys that almost look white and some appear as near black. They range from a $1 to $6 per stick depending on quality and brand names. Your possibilities to paint/sketch in pastels will explode like a supernova! *This by the way is totally aside from charcoals which are simply burnt wood in differing woods and hardnesses, natural and machine produced compressed in basic dark grey to black. There are also complete sets of pastels that range from say $25 ~ to over $100 but you may not want an entire set of colors just to do the sun and moon. A few dollars to sample one or two and experiment, you will see the intensity like oil paints on black pastel paper. Once you see this as you sketch with them, I warn you! You may become hooked into a new art world never previously known. . . To boldly go where no astronomy artist has gone before! (;

Good luck,

Mark

PS: I just stumbled over a rare like-new 1958 copy of Chesley Bonestell's Conquest of Space, signed by the author of the text, Willey Ley for $35 in the largest book store in the US here in Portland yesterday. It was like the late Christmas prize that I always dreamed of finding accidentally as I have only heard stories about the book for years. -M

Edited by markseibold (01/05/10 04:13 AM)


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TenthEnemy
scholastic sledgehammer


Reged: 01/21/08

Loc: Maryland
Re: Sun 1/3/10 new [Re: markseibold]
      #3540444 - 01/05/10 08:37 AM

You can't look at a bright red object very long until it starts to turn orange. The sun looks orange to me too, but I have been using red because it actually is red through the telescope. If I switch eyes while observing the sun becomes very red in the eye I haven't been using. I didn't use photoshop, I used Microsoft Office.

I'm already overwhelmed by the choices of pastels, and I don't have nearly as wide a selection as you describe. I think I may actually enjoy pastel pencils for the sun; I've tried one in the past and didn't like it, but I think it might be perfect for this.


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mikesemmler
sage


Reged: 06/01/09

Re: Sun 1/3/10 new [Re: TenthEnemy]
      #3542743 - 01/06/10 07:09 AM

Wow Tenth - what a great sketch -
Michael


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