Return to the Cloudy Nights Telescope Reviews home pageAstronomics discounts for Cloudy Nights members
· Get a Cloudy Nights T-Shirt · Submit a Review / Article

Click here if you are having trouble logging into the forums

Privacy Policy | Please read our Terms of Service | Signup and Troubleshooting FAQ | Problems? PM a Red or a Green Gu… uh, User

Equipment Discussions >> Binoculars

Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | (show all)
m00nless
sage


Reged: 08/06/08

Russian binoculars
      #3944820 - 07/26/10 09:26 AM

I am aware of previous posts about this subject, but would still like to hear opinions about the following Russian binoculars if possible:

BPC 10x40/15x50/16x50
BPC2 10x40/12x45
BPC3 12x45
BPC5 8x30
BPC6 8x30
BPShC 6x30/7x35/10x50


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Simon S
Carpal Tunnel
*****

Reged: 01/07/07

Loc: Crawley West Sussex UK
Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: m00nless]
      #3944827 - 07/26/10 09:28 AM

You will find a lot of these on my site below.
Search the Russian collection.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Cory Suddarth
Vendor


Reged: 08/10/06

Loc: Henryetta, OK. USA
Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Simon S]
      #3948207 - 07/27/10 08:07 PM

Simon,
My experience with the Ruskies are that QA is a real hit and miss event. It's not that they are super bad, but all the inherent anomalies will make you feel like you got a lemon. The most common downfall are the way the focusers feel. They don't have a smooth, well dampened feel. Cheezy! Sometimes you will think the whole glass got swept-up off the floor and put together. General advice, get one, just one, so you can say Cory told me so...

Cory


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Simon S
Carpal Tunnel
*****

Reged: 01/07/07

Loc: Crawley West Sussex UK
Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Cory Suddarth]
      #3948664 - 07/28/10 01:06 AM

Cory, your comment about the focus system is absolutely correct.
Some, indeed most Russian binoculars such as the Tento budget range of 10x50 offer fantastic optics for the price, we use a pair at work for searching for birds and owls in a field at work.
The Russian 12x40 and the dumpy little 6x24 are the best. The 12x40 gives a well corrected bright view, and although heavy it is robust and tough. The 6x24 is superb, wide angle, sharp fairly light, and one of my favourites.
Oh and don't forget the individual focus huge oculars and almost sharp to edge.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
StarStuff1
Post Laureate
*****

Reged: 04/01/07

Loc: South of the Mason-Dixon Line
Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Simon S]
      #3950351 - 07/28/10 08:24 PM

My 15+ year old 12x45s (BCP2s I think) are not bad. They are lightweight, sharp out to 2/3rds from the center, mechanically solid and have a robust hard leather case. The AFoV is hard to determine as the eye relief from the hard solid eyecups prevent me from seeing the field stop. Decently wide AFoV, though.

Purchased at surplus then for $40 made it a decent binocular for it's cost. There have been no problems with the focuser or diopter adjustments. A tiny bit loose perhaps but very functional.

Terry

Edited by StarStuff1 (07/28/10 08:27 PM)


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Roadbike
super member


Reged: 12/02/06

Loc: Virginia, USA
Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: m00nless]
      #3951317 - 07/29/10 10:31 AM

My experience with 6x30 and 8x30 sizes is that you may have to go through half a dozen or more to find one in decent condition. Primary problem involved a loose focuser that meant the diopter had to be reset for every change in focus. Secondary problem involved metal particles left over from machining that were inside the barrels. I gave up the search and spent more on good bins from Nikon.

If you can find a good pair for under $100.00 then go for it.

Edited by Roadbike (07/29/10 10:32 AM)


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Simon S
Carpal Tunnel
*****

Reged: 01/07/07

Loc: Crawley West Sussex UK
Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Roadbike]
      #3951385 - 07/29/10 11:10 AM

Roadbike, yes a lot of the 8x30's are variable in quality and a shop test is a good idea. But a Rusian 8x30 should cost no more that $80, less than 1/3 a Nikon.

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Roadbike
super member


Reged: 12/02/06

Loc: Virginia, USA
Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Simon S]
      #3951398 - 07/29/10 11:14 AM

Interesting. I only checked 2 websites and the prices were around $140. Maybe the auction site has them for better prices.

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Simon S
Carpal Tunnel
*****

Reged: 01/07/07

Loc: Crawley West Sussex UK
Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Roadbike]
      #3951540 - 07/29/10 12:34 PM

I paid
£36 for a pair of the 8x30 from the states a few years ago, some places are well overpriced.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
m00nless
sage


Reged: 08/06/08

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Simon S]
      #3951551 - 07/29/10 12:39 PM

Simon, where did you get the 8x30 from?

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Simon S
Carpal Tunnel
*****

Reged: 01/07/07

Loc: Crawley West Sussex UK
Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: m00nless]
      #3951566 - 07/29/10 12:51 PM

I can't remember now, I have bought so many but have search around.

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Collimator
super member


Reged: 09/05/12

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Simon S]
      #5426908 - 09/18/12 08:52 AM

Russian binoculars can be variable in quality depending on who imported them.
My understanding is that there are export versions, Soviet and Russian home versions and military versions.
The ones imported officially in Soviet times into the U.K. were on average good with some being outstanding.
Over the years I have tested well over a hundred of many types.
For my own use the selected 12 x 45s are excellent. They are durable and the central resolution is high.
I could easily separate Mizar an unequal double star at 14.4 arcseconds if the binocular was very well braced but not tripod mounted.
This is more difficult now due to some eye deterioration.
In context I could just separate Mizar in a braced 10 x 30 Canon IS and also with several fine modern roof prism binoculars.
I believe that someone with exceptional sight with exceptional resolution could separate Mizar with an 8 x top quality binocular or even 6x. Many people cannot separate Mizar with a good 12 x 45, but part of this is lack of experience.
For me the 12 x 45 Soviet binocular is excellent and I used it daily for over a decade.
The 20 x 60 Super Soviet binocular I used was simply superb.
I believe that these were specially made with selected prisms better than 1/10th wave and selected O.Gs and selected eyepieces. Then hand assembled and tested by master craftsmen.
There will be very few of these around.
When the Soviet Union broke up the quality of the 20 x 60s dropped alarmingly. They look the same but are not.
An average Soviet 20 x 60 seems better than the best 20 x 60 Kronos Russian of which I have tested many.
They are O.K. for Deep Sky work, but in resolution they are not in the same league.
Also mechanicaly they are shoddy.
They are still good value despite this.
When the State subsidies stopped some of the Russian binocular quality went into free fall.
The EWA 6x30, 7x35, 8x40 and 10 x 50 are interesting because they are almost unique nowadays regarding the field of view. But they are poor mechanically.
There are many varieties of some Russian/Soviet binoculars. Some with reticule, some without.
Some with the ridiculous ruby coatings. At least this is option is offered but thankfully I have never met one.
There are various finishes. Leather, camoflage etc.
If you test a Soviet binocular or even a Russian one you may find it outstanding, but it might be not so good.
I have the greatest respect for Soviet optics.
The sloppiness of the focussing is partly due to poor tolerances. Some certainly work at minus 35C as I have used them in winter. They are claimed to work at minus 45C and I am sure they do.
Leather cases and straps are essential as at these temperatures plastics usually fail completely. They become brittle and break into fragments as I have found to my cost.
The 10 x 40 version of the 12 x 45 is not so good having ghost images.
And some maybe the 15 x 50 and 16 x 50 are variable.
Compared to the Chinese consumer binocular offerings at the lower end nearly any Soviet binocular is outstanding.
I find there is almost no quality control of these Chinese binoculars and vast numbers should have have never been allowed out of the factory gate.
It is the Wild West with these Chinese makes.
Some Soviet optics I have tested are as good as anything made anywhere.

At mid and high price the Chinese binoculars can be very good especially with a good name on them.

Hope this helps.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
laserrain
member


Reged: 09/07/12

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Collimator]
      #5426953 - 09/18/12 09:30 AM

I do quote everything collimator says
I've got a 10x50 Tento, two (separated from birth) halves 20x60 of different brand (the left half has a wonderful resolution but it shows dimmer stars than the right half), a 10x46 plastic prismatic mono which showed a defective coating on the cemented doublet (despite that, it was capable of excellent sharpness), a 10x50 half, a 7x35 half and finally a fine all metal 20x30 with erecting lenses (same brand as that of many telephoto lenses, "made in russia").
I know, chinese binoculars are quite ugly compared to the worst russian production in the early '90s.
This post recalls my views through a heavy MTO 4" produced in 1984, a real masterpiece.
Anthony


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Binojunky
Carpal Tunnel
*****

Reged: 12/25/10

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: laserrain]
      #5427002 - 09/18/12 09:54 AM

I had at one time a Tento 7x50,came with a solid leather hard case and filters, always regretted selling it, one thing that is consistant with Russian binos is the lack of eye relief for eyeglass use, this has caused me in the past to get rid of another pair, an 8x30 Zeiss lookalike, again it was an outstanding binocular however with my classes off I coudn,t get enough focus at infinity.I own at this moment a 20x60,7x35 roof prism,4x36 Galilaon,8x30 monocular and last year I picked up a NOS Made in the USSR 10x30 "Tourist 3" draw tube telescope. At one time Russian stuff could be picked up very reasonable however today the prices have got crazy.Worth noteing is that the Russians still make some outstanding mechanical wrist watches, cockpit clocks etc,of which I have several,DA.

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Collimator
super member


Reged: 09/05/12

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: laserrain]
      #5427034 - 09/18/12 10:16 AM

Thanks Anthony,
My 10 x 46 works fine except the focussing is rough.
They make useful telescope finders.
The Russian metal spotters with erecting lenses are I think the 10 x 30 and 20 x 50. The resolution and image quality of the exported 20 x 50s is usually outstanding.
Compare that with the fancy Chinese 10x,12x,15x and 20 x 50
monoculars, which generally are poor optically showing astigmatism and they also have backlash in the focussing.
Again poor or no quality control.
These Chinese monoculars have to my knowledge at least 8 different brand names, all seemingly identical with the same cartons. Badge engineering at its worse.
The Russian drawtube spotters are far and away better optically although they have a narrow field.
There is also a zoom.
There are also other make Russian zoom spotters such as the 40mm with rotating focussing which are very good optically as well as 66mm and 70mm good quality Soviet/Russian spotting scopes.
Some of these have 3/8 inch tripod bushes but small adaptor bushes to 1/4 inch are available.
The 8 x 30 Soviet/Russian binoculars of which vast numbers were made are usually excellent. There is an advert showing a Russian Jeep type vehicle driving over one with no ill effects.
It is also available as a monocular. They have good eyepieces, very good also as Erfle or Bertele astro eyepieces. They even fit 0.965 inch drawtubes if necessary.
One was very good on my 6 inch modified Maksutov Cassegrain.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
hallelujah
Post Laureate
*****

Reged: 07/14/06

Loc: North Star over Colorado
Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Collimator]
      #5427078 - 09/18/12 10:43 AM

Quote:

The 20 x 60 Super Soviet binocular I used was simply superb.

I believe that these were specially made with selected prisms better than 1/10th wave and selected O.Gs and selected eyepieces.
Then hand assembled and tested by master craftsmen.

An average Soviet 20 x 60 seems better than the best 20 x 60 Kronos Russian of which I have tested many.

I have the greatest respect for Soviet optics.

Some certainly work at minus 35C as I have used them in winter.
They are claimed to work at minus 45C and I am sure they do.

Some Soviet optics I have tested are as good as anything made anywhere.




I have a made in Russia "TENTO" 20x60.
Optically it is very user friendly to my 65 yr. old eyeballs.
I use it without my eyeglasses. To my eyes it is sharper than my Pentax 20x60, during the daytime.

Mechanically my sample has yet to show any problems or defects.

The Tento 20x60 is one of the best binocular bargains that I have in my collection.

I think that I paid $60.00 for it and it is brand new.

I purchased it from a Russian gentleman here in Colorado who bought it new in the Soviet Union approx. 15 yrs. ago.

I have a small, paper, owner's guide of 6 pages written in Russian.
The date of manufacture is hand stamped either 1991 or 1997.

An excellent piece of craftsmanship.

Stan


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Collimator
super member


Reged: 09/05/12

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: hallelujah]
      #5427137 - 09/18/12 11:13 AM

Hi,
The 20 x 60 Pentax I tested was rather poor as far as image quality is concerned. I was disappointed. Also the field is very narrow. Pentax could have done better.
Pentax optics can be fantastic. I have a very old 8 x 24 Japanese Pentax which is fabulous and equals Leica etc. It is unfortunately not waterproof. Many Pentax were actually contracted out and made by other Japanese makers. The Chinese made 8 x 25 Pentax I believe is inferior in every way. I was told by the retailer it would be better. It is not in the same class as the ancient one.
The 16 x 60 Pentax is better optically than the 20 x 60, at least the one I tested. They should have kept the 16 x 60 rather than the 20 x 60 when they stopped making one.

There should be a date stamp on your 20 x 60 Tento. Either on the bottom of the hinge or in the serial number.
The Tento 20 x 60s are usually good, but I would go for a Soviet 20 x 60 rather than Russian one.
Unfortunately some have fungus after all this time.
If one finds an as new one it can be excellent.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Gordon Rayner
Carpal Tunnel
*****

Reged: 03/24/07

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Collimator]
      #5427150 - 09/18/12 11:19 AM

How is the TAL (Novosibirsk) 15 x 110 faring these days?

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Collimator
super member


Reged: 09/05/12

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Gordon Rayner]
      #5427227 - 09/18/12 11:57 AM

Unfortunately that was too large a binocular for me and I never tested it. I have seen several of them.I may have looked through one casually but in the daytime with a 3mm pupil it is a 15 x 45. So of course it looks great. I think they are still available maybe secondhand but possibly new.
There was also I think another version with higher magnification.
Also an amazing large Russian binocular with very complex 100 degree eyepieces of multielements that is meant to be an optical wonder.
I have not seen this in the flesh.
This can probably still be bought for a large sum.

The 6x to 100x 100mm Yukon Spotting scope is great if you get a good one. They vary.
They are now made straight through and inclined eyepiece.
They are extremely light, use mirrors and are great fun and a good one can easily handle 100x.

My 30 x 50 Yukon, I think, binocular using mirrors instead of prisms has fantastic resolution and collimation is spot one. The star images are much smaller than with most prismatic binoculars and it is great for double stars.
There are also Yukon spotters hand held using mirrors, as well as drawtube ones.
However, Yukons are variable in quality and some are not so good, so you really have to test and select the best.
For me a 15 x 110 binocular was not sensible as it is a long time since my pupils were over 7mm.
I think they are still used by coastguards and border guards.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
StarStuff1
Post Laureate
*****

Reged: 04/01/07

Loc: South of the Mason-Dixon Line
Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Collimator]
      #5427281 - 09/18/12 12:22 PM

About the time of comet Hale-Bopp I purchased more than 20 12x45 Russian (Soviet?) "armored vehicle commander" binoculars. This was a group purchase for my astro club. Anyway I still use one occasionally. The images are soft at the edges but very sharp in the center. Build quality is robust. I still have one in the box. Tested but not used.

FWIW, the Chinese can make binoculars as good as you want to pay for.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
hallelujah
Post Laureate
*****

Reged: 07/14/06

Loc: North Star over Colorado
Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Collimator]
      #5427376 - 09/18/12 01:08 PM

Quote:

The 16 x 60 Pentax is better optically than the 20 x 60, at least the one I tested.
They should have kept the 16 x 60 rather than the 20 x 60 when they stopped making one.

There should be a date stamp on your 20 x 60 Tento. Either on the bottom of the hinge or in the serial number.
The Tento 20 x 60s are usually good, but I would go for a Soviet 20 x 60 rather than Russian one.




There is a cap at the bottom of the hinge, it is stamped 91, so it was manufactured in 1991 instead of 1997.
Thanks for the heads up.

The serial number is also visible on the cap, in white paint, #N9110667.
I assume that the first two numbers (91) are also the year of manufacture.

Are you able to post some pictures of the Soviet 20x60 that you are referring to?

I have both the 16x60 PCF WP & a newer 20x60 PCF WP II & and an older 20x60 PCF WP.
I really haven't done any comparisons between the three aside from the optical coatings.

The newer 20x60 PCF WP II appears to have better optical coatings, at least on the front objectives.

Less reflection on the newer coatings & ghosting is not as noticable with the newer optical coatings compared to the older 16x60 PCF WP.

I still reach for the 20x60 first, rather than the 16x60 when it comes to stargazing & long distance bird watching.

There obviously are some sample variations between the Pentax 20x60 PCF WP's as well as the WP II's,
since all are manufactured in China.

Stan

Edited by hallelujah (09/18/12 03:08 PM)


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Collimator
super member


Reged: 09/05/12

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: hallelujah]
      #5427471 - 09/18/12 01:49 PM

Hi Stan.
Unfortunately I don't know how to post images.
The 20 x 60 I used was obtained from a top optics professional maker, who somehow obtained a very special batch, probably less than ten.
I have tested at least fifteen other ordinary 20 x 60s and none has come close to mine.
The special batch were made I think regardless of true cost.
It would not surprise me if the prisms are 1/20 wave.

The only thing that equals them is a 16 x 56 1955? Hensoldt. But even here the 20x outresolves the 16x.
The 30 x 50 Yukon mirror binoculars outresolves both, but does not have the light grasp.

An original 4 inch Soviet Maksutov from the 1950s with a serial number in single digits is much better than a 3 1/2 inch Questar.
It is clearly hand made by an optical master.
The U.S. Quantam might be as good, but I have not tested one.
A 5 1/2 inch Dutch compound Maksutov is also as far as I can tell flawless, probably by Den Oude Delft.

The 20 x 60 Pentax I tested has mushy star images. It is just not up to Pentax traditional standards.
I had a Pentax 100mm refractor, which was amazing.
Unfortunately some of Pentaxes Chinese optics are just not as good as they should be.

Regarding low quality Chinese optics that flood the world.
I cannot think of any optical factory in the last hundred years in the Soviet Union, Russia, All of Europe, All of the U.S.
Japan, Korea ,Macau, even Hong Kong and maybe Taiwan that would allow such poor optics to leave the factory.

In WW2 there were some very poor lenses made in the U.K. that were needed in great haste.
The alloy they were made from crumbled away. Yet they worked for perhaps a year which is all that was needed.
I am thinking of 8 inch f/2.9 Pentacs.
The 7inch U.S. Aero Ektars were much better, but even here there were Kodak coated and outsourced coated.
They are mostly starred now due to balsam failure.

And the Chinese made 30 to 100 x 30mm binoculars sold by Mail Order in large quantities. And other similar spec. Chinese binoculars.
I would think about 2% work in a fashion. The rest well, I don't want to comment.

So it is not a question of getting what you pay for.
Many of these binoculars are not fit for purpose.
In addition the stated specifications on some of the Chinese binoculars is totally divorced from reality.

So how is the consumer to know, when even the retail shop workers don't know what they are selling.

We have an amazing choice nowadays, probably far too much, but every binocular needs to be tested before purchase.
As to Chinese made binoculars. If it has a good name like Nikon then the chances are it will be good.

Hope this helps.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
laserrain
member


Reged: 09/07/12

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Collimator]
      #5427569 - 09/18/12 02:40 PM

Quote:

My 10 x 46 works fine except the focussing is rough.
They make useful telescope finders.
The Russian metal spotters with erecting lenses are I think the 10 x 30 and 20 x 50. The resolution and image quality of the exported 20 x 50s is usually outstanding.
Compare that with the fancy Chinese 10x,12x,15x and 20 x 50
monoculars, which generally are poor optically showing astigmatism and they also have backlash in the focussing.
Again poor or no quality control.
These Chinese monoculars have to my knowledge at least 8 different brand names, all seemingly identical with the same cartons. Badge engineering at its worse.
The Russian drawtube spotters are far and away better optically although they have a narrow field.
There is also a zoom.
There are also other make Russian zoom spotters such as the 40mm with rotating focussing which are very good optically as well as 66mm and 70mm good quality Soviet/Russian spotting scopes.



I quote again, but sure I own a 20x30 spotter all black painted. Fine mech, performance is interesting if related to the small aperture and the ultralow cost (I got it for a nothing, many years ago...). The rear section, once the spotter is extended, can be firmly aligned by a slight rotation. The optical scheme shows a sort of Barlow in front of the erecting double-doublet, instead of the relay lens contained in the common 10x30, which I used as a 14x30 finder (without the erecting lenses, magnification increases; the modified 20x50, turns to 30x or more without the relay group and shows a very beautiful Moon).
The eyepiece was the same in all cases: nice symmetrical 15 mm Plossl, perhaps it had a narrow field and the mount was rather uncomfortable for the eye, but one - without the original metal cap - is still working on my Dobsonian 10" as a default eyepiece.
The two small doublets of the erector group became a symmetrical eyepiece for a 46mm finder...

Anyway, ghost images affect a lot of the optics we're talking about. But once upon a time they were the cheapest. All my finders are Russian derived...

Quote:

An original 4 inch Soviet Maksutov from the 1950s with a serial number in single digits is much better than a 3 1/2 inch Questar.
It is clearly hand made by an optical master.
The U.S. Quantam might be as good, but I have not tested one.
A 5 1/2 inch Dutch compound Maksutov is also as far as I can tell flawless, probably by Den Oude Delft.





The MTO 1100 f/10.5 contains a double meniscus, the outer meniscus has a secondary mirror (not Mangin-like), the inner meniscus has a hole which acts as a baffle, then a spaced doublet flattens the field near the primary mirror.
Once collimated, the old MTOs are wonderful. After the doublet is removed, the MTO turns to a f/7 and still mantain a nice field of view.
At f/10.5, no doubt that planetary performances were very good. Unfortunately I never compared it to other catad systems. The new MTO 1000A has nothing to do with the older, to my knowledge.
Didn't know about that rare dutch 5"1/2 mak, but someone told me about larger MTOs than 4"...

Great discussion , folks, thank you all...
Anthony

Edited by laserrain (09/18/12 03:53 PM)


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Collimator
super member


Reged: 09/05/12

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: laserrain]
      #5427589 - 09/18/12 02:58 PM

Thank you Anthony for the correction.
The 20 x 30 in black must come from the factory that makes the black 8? to 24? x40 with rotating focusser and rotating zoom.
I forget the details as it must be ten years since I used it.
I think they also made a 32mm?
The Turists, at least the ones I have seen, are a greyish colour. 10x30 and 20 x 50.
I have also learnt something new from you in that if you remove the erector lenses you get a higher powered telescope.

The Broadhurst Clarkson fine drawtube brass telescopes leather covered have very nice erector eyepieces.
These make wonderful flat field magnifiers perhaps 20x.
In fact I have sometimes bought broken drawtube scopes just to get these types of terrestrial eyepieces, which I use as flat field magnifiers.
I think most of them have the same arrangement.
The problem with them is that dust usually gets on the elements and one of these is in clear focus, so nearly all the old ones need cleaning.
But usually the machining is so beautiful they come apart nicely even after 50 to 100 years.

Thanks again.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
hallelujah
Post Laureate
*****

Reged: 07/14/06

Loc: North Star over Colorado
Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Collimator]
      #5427618 - 09/18/12 03:15 PM

Quote:

The 20 x 60 Pentax I tested has mushy star images. It is just not up to Pentax traditional standards.

As to Chinese made binoculars. If it has a good name like Nikon then the chances are it will be good.




My Pentax PCF WP binoculars do not have mushy star images.

Fortunately Pentax is also a good name coming out of China.

Thanks for sharing with us, I hope that you will continue to do so.

Where do you live?

Stan


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
laserrain
member


Reged: 09/07/12

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Collimator]
      #5427652 - 09/18/12 03:36 PM

Thanks to you, Collimator,
Quote:

Thank you Anthony for the correction.
The 20 x 30 in black must come from the factory that makes the black 8? to 24? x40 with rotating focusser and rotating zoom.
I forget the details as it must be ten years since I used it.
I think they also made a 32mm?




Let me remember: the brand was a C inside a triangle and a circle, the same as the MTO and many other photo lenses.

Yes, the "C" also made a zoom 8-24x40, I recall it now...
I have got a mak 500mm f/6.3, a 50 mm f/2.8 macro and a 37 mm f/2.8, but I'm sure they made also a 28 and a 24 mm, sometimes with K mount instead of the older 42x1...
No, not sure about the 28 or 24 mm and the K mount...Memory lack, sorry :-(

Anthony

Edited by laserrain (09/18/12 03:45 PM)


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Simon S
Carpal Tunnel
*****

Reged: 01/07/07

Loc: Crawley West Sussex UK
Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: hallelujah]
      #5427665 - 09/18/12 03:41 PM

I have a lot of time for Russian optics, especially the fantastic 6x24 Komz a fantastic performer only let down by it's yellow hue and slightly sloppy focus mechanism.
Then there is the ZOMZ BPO 7x30 with the bright view and pin sharp optics.
Take a look at my Russian collection. http://www.flickr.com/photos/binoculars/sets/72157623397593828/with/3108245844/

Edited by Simon S (09/18/12 03:45 PM)


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Collimator
super member


Reged: 09/05/12

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Simon S]
      #5427915 - 09/18/12 05:45 PM

Thanks All.
The 8 to 20 x 32 is maybe a Turist type. I may have one somewhere.

The early MTO I talked about I think predates the common MTO and maybe the RUSSAR?? later double meniscus type.
The earliest ones came in a fitted wooden box.
The lens hood with a lip inwards facing is part of the optical train and is I think an exterior field stop.
I think it is a simple Maksutov Cassegrain just exquisitely made by hand literally cost of manufacture not important.

I have an Orion 20mm f/6.3? for Leica copy or Contax/Nikon RF copy. I.e. Kiev, which are not quite compatible.
I damaged the chrome of a Zunow 50mm f/1.1 rear mount chrome lens, just using one roll of film on a Kiev. It was brand new. Interesting lens.
The 37mm f/2.8 are common but I don't know the 28mm and 24mm. Some of the later supposedly Russian lenses are in fact Japanese.

The Russian MTOs are in a way not properly what they say they are.
The 500mm f/8 is geometrically f/8 and 62.5mm aperture.
However, Minolta, Nikon and Canon 500mm f/8 are 75 mm aperture to correct for the central obstruction.
So the MTO 500mm f/8 is about T/10 even not taking into account transmission losses, so maybe T/11 in fact.
Some of the independent Japanese mirror lenses are less than 75mm, say 72mm or smaller, so in a way these are also'cheating'.
Similarly the 1000mm MTO is just over 100 mm aperture from memory and maybe T/12.

The 6 x 24 KOMZ ? has an almost distortion free eyepiece, and seems to be designed for a reticule. But the C/F normal version has no reticle but has very nice coatings. This is the 1977 2nd version.

I measured the field as a true 11.55 degrees, posssibly 11.6 degrees but the extreme edge is a blur.
There is a sudden rapid change in magnification as you near the edge.
The edge performance is poor especially for someone with little accomodation.
The stars images are good.
I will compare it with an EWA 6x 25 Japanese Micro external prism 1950s binocular. This has severe pincushion distortion, but is very small and very useful. It may equal the 6 x 24 in field size.
The 7 x 35 Minolta Standard with a useful and measured 11.05 degree field is probably more useful than either for astronomy.
I will compare all three.
But all three are lovely.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
hallelujah
Post Laureate
*****

Reged: 07/14/06

Loc: North Star over Colorado
Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Collimator]
      #5427961 - 09/18/12 06:08 PM

Quote:

The Russian MTOs are in a way not properly what they say they are.
The 500mm f/8 is geometrically f/8 and 62.5mm aperture.
However, Minolta, Nikon and Canon 500mm f/8 are 75 mm aperture to correct for the central obstruction.
So the MTO 500mm f/8 is about T/10 even not taking into account transmission losses, so maybe T/11 in fact.
Some of the independent Japanese mirror lenses are less than 75mm, say 72mm or smaller, so in a way these are also'cheating'.




Now I'm showing my age even more.

Back in the early 70's, when I was really into 35mm cameras & lenses, I owned a Vivitar 600mm mirror lens.

I don't remember very much about it other than the fact that it was very big around & awkward to use.

Around that time I also had a Tamron 500mm f8 mirror lens.
It was smaller & much easier to use.

Stan

Edited by hallelujah (09/20/12 10:27 AM)


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Simon S
Carpal Tunnel
*****

Reged: 01/07/07

Loc: Crawley West Sussex UK
Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: hallelujah]
      #5428717 - 09/19/12 05:02 AM

Slightly off topic I bought a Zenit 16mm M42 lens for my DSLR. It offers a great image for less that £130. Russian glass although not the best is very respectable.

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
johntrob
sage
*****

Reged: 03/14/11

Loc: Georgia, USA
Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: StarStuff1]
      #5428811 - 09/19/12 07:26 AM

I did not see the Kronos 26x70's mentioned. Has anyone had experience with them?

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
hallelujah
Post Laureate
*****

Reged: 07/14/06

Loc: North Star over Colorado
Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: johntrob]
      #5429510 - 09/19/12 04:21 PM

http://www.cloudynights.com/item.php?item_id=202

http://www.cloudynights.com/ubbthreads/showflat.php/Cat/0/Number/3344141/Main/2740894


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
johntrob
sage
*****

Reged: 03/14/11

Loc: Georgia, USA
Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: hallelujah]
      #5429640 - 09/19/12 06:03 PM

Thanks, I have got to learn how to search better.

John


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Collimator
super member


Reged: 09/05/12

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: hallelujah]
      #5430290 - 09/20/12 02:58 AM

The 600mmf/8 Vivitar Series 1 solid catadioptric lens is one of the 3 best lenses I have tested.
My original one split Epsilon Lyrae both pairs at 180x with a 10mm monocular converter and 3x teleconverter. 2.5 arcseconds approx.
It also operates without variation at 0C after being brought out from indoors at 20C.
It was designed by Perkin Elmer I think and the original bears this name.
Also Vivitar made the 800mm f/11, which I have not tested or seen. It is rumoured much larger ones were made.
However, 2 later 600mm solid cats I tested are poor. One was poorly reassembled. The other shows low contrast.
Whether they varied I don't know.
There was also I think a plastic Vivitar 450mm f/4.5 ??? They had problems making these.
There are some old long refractive Vivitars. I am not sure if you mean these.
The Tamron SP 500mm f/8 is usually very good. I have tested several.
An Optomax 500mm f/8 ordinary mirror lens was very good indeed as were the Nikon, Minolta and Canon 500mm f/8.
There is also the Pentax 500mm f/8 mirror lens telescope and a scope based on the 500mm f/8 Tamron, both these are sold as spotting scopes.
I have tested very many mirror lenses.
Hope this helps.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Collimator
super member


Reged: 09/05/12

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Collimator]
      #5430301 - 09/20/12 03:20 AM

Briefly tested 6 x 24 KOMZ 1977 binocular and 6 x 25 1950s micro black/chrome EWA (Steiner). The 6 x 25 have external prism housings.

6 x 24 490gm
Bad ghosting testing near a street light and bulkhead fitting also, including large ghost rings. This is despite excellent multicoats of varying clours. I don't think the prisms are coated but will test further.
Mechanically very nice. Engineering good. well cased prisms.
Eyepieces are unusual. I am guessing they are 5 element but maybe wrong.
They are rectilinear almost or distortion free. This makes for very nice central views but towards the edge there are dramatic magnification changes.
This also occurs with the 7 and maybe 8 element eyepieces on the 7 x 30? and 10 x 42??. These are meant to be be the best resolving binoculars made, but I am doubtful of this. I found them to be unusual. The eyepieces in these two are almost totally distortion free.
The 6 x 24 has a measured field of 11.55, possibly 11.6 degrees.

The 6 x 25 micro have very basic, even poor coatings with qhite a few uncoated surfaces.
Despite this it has few ghosts and is much better in this respect than the 6 x 24 KOMZ.
There is however severe pincushion distortion.
The edge resolution of the 6 x 25 is much better than the 6x 24. Edgs stars are much better.
The 6 x 25 weigh 429gm. They are less bulky than the 6 x 24 and rather easily go in the pocket.
The marked field of the 6 x 25 is 11.5 degrees. I have checked this but forget what the measured field was.
When skies are clear I will recheck.

Both binoculars are very nice, but quite different.
Further tests will be made.
Mechanically the 6 x 25 is not as good as the 6 x 24, particularly regarding focus, but the 6 x 25s have had more use.
Both are secondhand.
Will hopefully report further and also compare with 7 x 35 EWA Minolta Standard.
There was a very nice Baush and Lomb? 6 x 24? porroprism, but I have never seen one in the flesh.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
laserrain
member


Reged: 09/07/12

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Collimator]
      #5430450 - 09/20/12 07:50 AM

Quote:

The Tamron SP 500mm f/8 is usually very good. I have tested several.




I do agree. Coupled with the Tamron 2x Adaptall, it has a high resolution still.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
planetmalc
sage


Reged: 10/21/09

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Collimator]
      #5430912 - 09/20/12 01:03 PM

Quote:

The 6x to 100x 100mm Yukon Spotting scope is great if you get a good one. They vary.





I've tried one of these out in the daytime, and it was surprisingly good.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
planetmalc
sage


Reged: 10/21/09

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Collimator]
      #5430966 - 09/20/12 01:33 PM

Quote:

An original 4 inch Soviet Maksutov from the 1950s with a serial number in single digits is much better than a 3 1/2 inch Questar.
It is clearly hand made by an optical master.





Are you referring to the futuristic (by 1950's standards) scope + integral mount, which was a gold-coloured combo and had proprietary eyepieces in a rotating turret? I've examined one of these and it looked like a concentric Maksutov-Cassegrain design (all the curves - primary mirror, secondary mirror and the two surfaces of the corrector - having a common centre of curvature positioned at the external aperture stop). The stop was built into the end of the lens hood, and it was instructive to watch the well-nigh perfect imagery of the instrument deteriorate into mush by simply whipping off the lens hood. I think the design (which is free of almost all abberations apart from field curvature) has some inherent colour error, but this may not be too bad in a long-focus design (and could probably be removed by careful design of the eyepieces).

Much better than a 3.5" Questar? Well, I own a Questar 3.5" and find it difficult to imagine anything better, for the size. Certainly, I'd much rather observe with the 90 degree viewing-position Questar than with that straight-through Russian Mak, and when it comes to back-packing the instrument, well, it's a no-brainer!


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
planetmalc
sage


Reged: 10/21/09

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Collimator]
      #5430982 - 09/20/12 01:44 PM

Quote:

The early MTO I talked about I think predates the common MTO and maybe the RUSSAR?? later double meniscus type.
The earliest ones came in a fitted wooden box.
The lens hood with a lip inwards facing is part of the optical train and is I think an exterior field stop.
I think it is a simple Maksutov Cassegrain just exquisitely made by hand literally cost of manufacture not important.






I had one of these and sold it to a guy who used it as a telescope and was amazed at how well it performed. I still have the fitted case and the coloured full-aperture filters that came with it. Optically, I think it's similar to the futuristic 4" Mak telescope (a concentric Mak-Cassegrain).


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
planetmalc
sage


Reged: 10/21/09

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Simon S]
      #5430990 - 09/20/12 01:48 PM

Quote:

The Russian 12x40 and the dumpy little 6x24 are the best. The 12x40 gives a well corrected bright view, and although heavy it is robust and tough. The 6x24 is superb, wide angle, sharp fairly light, and one of my favourites.
Oh and don't forget the individual focus huge oculars and almost sharp to edge.




Great binoculars, and pretty cheap too!


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
hallelujah
Post Laureate
*****

Reged: 07/14/06

Loc: North Star over Colorado
Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Simon S]
      #5431049 - 09/20/12 02:14 PM

Simon,

Which one of your Russian 12x40's is the sharpest, the Tento or the Zoomz?

Stan


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Collimator
super member


Reged: 09/05/12

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: planetmalc]
      #5431074 - 09/20/12 02:29 PM

Actually I know both the dedicated Russian 4 inch scope and the Camera lens. I think they may have also made a similar 6 inch scope?
It is the camera lens which is of extraordinary quality.

I cannot remember the serial No. but it is something like 003, and I don't think this refers to a certain year, but may be the third one ever made for sale. The serial number is anyway I think below 7, but my memory is not so good.

Horace Dall tested the, or a, 3.5 inch Questar and from memory he said it was undercorrected.
I think the Questars like most things vary from one to the other.
I have tested two Questars and this particular 100mm Soviet mirror lens definitely is better.

The 6 x 24 KOMZ I just tested is not individual eyepiece but standard centre focus.
It is a lovely binocular with an almost rectilinear eyepiece, but at least on the stars and also terrestrially the edge performance is not good. It also displays many ghost images near a street light.
The one tested is in very fine condition and totally clear internally. In fact pretty much as new except some marks on the paint. The case and leather strap are more or less as new.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Simon S
Carpal Tunnel
*****

Reged: 01/07/07

Loc: Crawley West Sussex UK
Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: hallelujah]
      #5431103 - 09/20/12 02:49 PM

Quote:

Simon,

Which one of your Russian 12x40's is the sharpest, the Tento or the Zoomz?

Stan



The Zomz Stan. There are two models that look almost identical, the one in my collection has better oculars and is sharper.
Collimator, I am surprised your 6x24 has prism cutoff, what serial number is it?


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
hallelujah
Post Laureate
*****

Reged: 07/14/06

Loc: North Star over Colorado
Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Simon S]
      #5431120 - 09/20/12 03:01 PM

Quote:

The Zomz Stan.




Thanks Simon.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Collimator
super member


Reged: 09/05/12

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Simon S]
      #5431220 - 09/20/12 03:57 PM

No it does not have prism cut off. It is 1977 Bin 2. Made in USSR.
The exit pupils are round up and down at edge of eye lenses.
One side sideways is round and the other slightly tear drop.
Perfectly collimated. The left eyepiece has an exact mirror copy of the exit pupils in the right eyepiece.
But there is a dramatic drop in star quality towards the field edges. This is also seen terrestrially.
Also the sideways or radial magnification drops sharply as you approach the edge.
I have seen a similar situation less pronounced in the 7x30 and 10x42?. It is several years since I tested these last two, so this is from memory only. These last two have the most distortion free eyepieces I have seen. The 6 x 24 eyepieces are not totally distortion free but almost.
I am not sure of this but the eye lens outer surfaces may be slightly concave.
I have a spherometer but I will not use it as the optics here are immaculate as new.
The extreme edge is a blur, I presume because there is no field stop or the field stop is too wide. But this is at 98% field to 100%.
I have not tested it fully.
The 6 x 25 Micro 1950s that I compared it too has some veiling glare, but the coatings are basic.
The coatings on the 6 x 24 are first class multicoatings, but maybe uncoated prisms.
The contrast with the 6 x 24 is high,and the resolution may be also very good, but I must test further. But there are numerous ghosts near a streetlight about 30 ft away. The streetlight is partly shielded but still bright.
There are also large ghostly rings.
I have seen worse, and it is not normally a problem. It is just an observation.
Stangely, the 6 x 25 micro has almost no ghosts.
I think it is the design.
An old Leitz uncoated 7 x 50 shows no ghosts at all and beautiful images despite no coating.
I must do more tests.
I am basically testing from an astronomy viewpoint and the edge drop may be partly due to a curved field.
Someone with more accommodation than me might not see such a drop in edge performance.
But I am also a terrestrial user, so don't base everything on star tests.
However, Jupiter is nicely seen as a disc and 3 moons easily seen two nights ago in the 6 x 24. 4 were visible with larger binoculars, of which I used several.
The 10 x 40 version of the 12 x 45 is a bit strange as I think they had to graft a short focus 40mm onto the body or something.
It is odd and gives rise to light creeping in from the sides somehow, so it has disturbing bright ghost images.
It was not designed correctly as a 10 x 40.
Hope this is useful.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Collimator
super member


Reged: 09/05/12

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Collimator]
      #5432312 - 09/21/12 09:15 AM

Regarding Russian binoculars I have several new but old 2.5 x 17.5 binoculars, actually opera glasses. Made in Russia by C in a triangle, which is a good maker. Black stippled finish all metal.
I also have several similar new/old monoculars, which are sold as the world's smallest monoculars.
The 'binocular' I am looking at now has a tiny O.G
multicoated on three surfaces, and one uncoated surface.
The single lens eyepiece is uncoated. I am not 100% sure of this as the elements are so small.
As is often the case with Russian/Soviet optics the two O.Gs have different colour multicoats.
One has 3 purplish coats, one 3 gold looking multicoats.
I think the 2 O.Gs came from different coating batches.
But the coatings in each are consistent on the 3 surfaces.

Focussing is by individual front cell rotation and is smooth.
So this is an independent object glass focus binocular.
The one I am looking at has an eyepiece edge chip that does not affect the view, which is sharp.
It is wrapped in Russian tissue paper and comes in an oblong
translucent plastic white container with oblong click top.
The container has the C in the triangle and in Russian it says in stylised capital letters ARENA I think.
No date but the 2nd. version as marked in white on the black body.
Centre hinged for IPD changes from very little to enough.

Here is the strange thing. In two of the others I cannot remember if the monocular or binocular there are larvae or bugs entombed inside the optics.
They may have been eggs that hatched, but I suppose a long time into the future they will become fossilised.
So you get free extras with your optics here.
As I have no idea what species these are I just leave them alone.
They are probably from this planet.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
laserrain
member


Reged: 09/07/12

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Collimator]
      #5433893 - 09/22/12 05:53 AM

Quote:

Here is the strange thing. In two of the others I cannot remember if the monocular or binocular there are larvae or bugs entombed inside the optics.
They may have been eggs that hatched, but I suppose a long time into the future they will become fossilised.
So you get free extras with your optics here.
As I have no idea what species these are I just leave them alone.
They are probably from this planet.




ROFL

And now I recall: a prismatic mono (half ZIF bino), rotating eyepiece focuser and two (2) magnifications (12x, 20x): two (2) interchangeable doublets (a 60 mm diam and a 35 mm diam), Minolta style mounted. All these pieces where in a nice leather case. I believe the small 35 mm doublet was left forever in the case. Because the "owner" increased the price soon after I had succeded in replacing the larger doublet with the smaller one, that nice mono leaves only in my own RAM. Both lenses had a reddish coating like one of my half 20x60 (the other one has a blue coating). Never attempted to couple them in a single bino, I believe they will become fossilised apart.
Anthony


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
laserrain
member


Reged: 09/07/12

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: laserrain]
      #5433911 - 09/22/12 06:41 AM

Another gadget, was the end segment of the "C" 20x50 mono, coupled to a 42x1 screw so that one could see an erected image through every 42x1 lens...It was black painted, I believe it had the effect of a 18 mm eyepiece focal length or less. We called it "telescoper" lens eyepiece, but the japanese "telescoper" was different, I never handled it.
Anthony


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Collimator
super member


Reged: 09/05/12

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: laserrain]
      #5433944 - 09/22/12 07:30 AM

I think the 20 x 50 black painted had a folding pistol grip.
Although I did not remember it earlier I may actually have one of these. Or the larger version 66mm or 70mm. My memory is not so good.
I had the 12x/20x 40mm/60mm Monocular like half a 60mm binocular.
My one was very frustrating.
It has an optical window and a bayonet mount.
With both barrels the optical performance was excellent.
But the bayonet mount material was made of rubbish alloy.
The optical window was for ever coated in a blackish gooey mess that proved impossible to clean off.
I gave it away as impossible to use without my getting a bit angry.
However, others who have this convertible monocular did not have this problem.
I may have one from a faulty alloy batch.

I don't think I know the 35mm/60?mm convertible.

Sounds similar to the old Canon convertible long telephoto combination lens for film cameras.
And even older even ancient convertible lens units that professional photographers used.
There were rather many of these.
Also a strange Tamron telephoto duo, which I have somewhere.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Collimator
super member


Reged: 09/05/12

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: laserrain]
      #5433953 - 09/22/12 07:51 AM

There is the rare Soviet/Russian monocular or tele converter with eyepiece in a long tube that I think contain relay lenses.
This is identical to part of one of the Soviet/Russian scopes.
I have one of these.
I am not sure I know of the smaller prismatic Russian one.
Tamron had a 90 degree monocular converter to fit on the back of camera lenses. These are difficult to find.
again I have one. 18mm I think.
The Japanese monocular converters have 10mm eyepieces 3 element and are available in numerous mounts.
I collect these and use them to test lenses in different fittings.
There is also Minoltas own version.
The Nikon one is rare and expensive.
Pentax made a different looking one, which is scarce.
Leica has an odd one, maybe third party.
The back end of the 45 degree Pentax spotter which includes their own 500mm f/8 mirror lens is excellent and I use it to fit on other lenses.
From memory it is a T2 mount.
There are new rear monocular units just out from Kenco?
These are expensive and you need a different one for each make of lenses.
The old Japanese ones can be used with T2 lenses in numerous fittings.
As many mirror lenses are T2 fitting it opens up a huge range of possibilities.
Mirror lenses work very well as scopes even with 2x and 3x teleconverters.
There are now many odd Chinese rear mounted lens eyepiece converters.
The range of photographic bayonet and screw mounts is so vast that I have trouble identifying them.
I must know over a hundred just by looking at them, but some still defeat me.
There must be hundreds of different ones made over the last 150 years.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
planetmalc
sage


Reged: 10/21/09

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: laserrain]
      #5434176 - 09/22/12 10:42 AM

Quote:

Another gadget, was the end segment of the "C" 20x50 mono, coupled to a 42x1 screw so that one could see an erected image through every 42x1 lens...It was black painted, I believe it had the effect of a 18 mm eyepiece focal length or less. We called it "telescoper" lens eyepiece, but the japanese "telescoper" was different, I never handled it.
Anthony




I think it might have been the Kirsch 'Teleskoper', and it was regularly advertised in 'Amateur Photographer' magazine. They were based in Leeds, so they may have been the remnants of the Kershaw company, rebadged with a fancy Teutonic name. I think I've got one of these units at home - excellent optics as I recall.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
hallelujah
Post Laureate
*****

Reged: 07/14/06

Loc: North Star over Colorado
Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: planetmalc]
      #5434220 - 09/22/12 11:09 AM

More Russian optics:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/ZOMZ-12X40-20X60-RUSSIAN-MONOCULAR-MONOSCOOP-ORIG-BOX-/150881387511?pt=Binocular&hash=item23213b43f7

Stan


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Collimator
super member


Reged: 09/05/12

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Collimator]
      #5434224 - 09/22/12 11:12 AM

Another very nice Soviet item is the 5 x 25 Monocular.
The one I have here is bright glossy red metal smart looking well made mechanically and very nice optically.
It has very nice multicoats and single coated surfaces.
The porroprisms are uncoated. The O.G. cemented.
It says in Russian MON and 5 x 25 white on red.
It even has two arrows to tell you which way it folds.
The Japanese 8 x 21s don't, nor as far as I remember do the German or British folding 8 x 21 monoculars.
This Soviet one has a rotating eyepiece focus with a nice thick rubber insert against the eye.
When it is minus 30 degrees you don't want your eyes or eyebrows to touch and stick to a metal surface. You will not repeat this often if you do it.
I see I have scratched two tiny marks in the black metal hinge surface as it rotates a bit past 90 degrees to give a correct orientation image.
You can use it open but everything is upside down. Suitable for Australia? Maybe not.
Near focus for me about 15ft. but my eyes are not that great. there is a little pincushion distortion at the edge but not much.
The Russian instruction leaflet, 6 pages, has a hand written date 16.10.86
i.e. 16 October 1986.
It is made by 3OM3. Not sure what that is in english.
It has a passed quality control stamp, but no signature of the craftsman and a lot is not filled out on the separate sheet, such as the serial number.
These are often filled out with Soviet optics.
I cannot actually find an external serial number.
5x, 10 degrees, exit pupil 5mm, eye relief? 14.7mm,
Resolution 9 arcseconds. I suppose that is possible with a black spot on a white background.
Mass 0,130 kg or 130 gm.
Size 74 x 52 x52 mm
+ - 5 dioptre
Set icludes Monocular, leather strap, leather case, instuctions. 1 of each according to the leaflet.
Operating temperature minus 30C to plus 45C

It also says I think not to subject it to more than 45C
And there is something within the extensive Russian text about plus 5C.
I might take the leaflet into the street and ask a Russian speaker what it means.
The only fault is that the paper leaflet is crumbling.
It is folded in the leather case next to the monocular.
Presumably it originally came in the standard Russian tissue paper and cardboard box and maybe outer box.
I always enjoy seeing how the Soviets clearly tried to be thorough.
The leather for the case is thin but good quality. It does not smell. Grey very thin inner lining and two thicker blue side pads.
In short, this is a very nice piece of optics.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
laserrain
member


Reged: 09/07/12

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Collimator]
      #5434599 - 09/22/12 02:47 PM

Quote:

I had the 12x/20x 40mm/60mm Monocular like half a 60mm binocular.
My one was very frustrating.



Thx for the correction, now I recall it was a 40 mm instead of 35 as I wrote before.
The relay lenses in the russian telescoper were exactly the same as in the mono. Most of the monos I saw in the early '90s were light grey painted except for the eyepiece and the metal conic shade cap, on which the "C" and the scope specifications were white painted also.
On the main section of the 20x50 and also on 20x30, there was a hole for a tripod screw. Not on the 10x30 body.
I saw also 20x50 and 10x30 with the smallest section painted in black but the main one painted in glass-bottle green. Perhaps my eyes saw also a 30x50 or 40x50 but I'm not sure. Never looked through. All these had a long conic case with a screw hood and strap. The conic case, despite the screw hood, wasn't waterproof...Water could get in through the bottom...
After years, the yellow sponges put inside the case, placed for preventing shocks, glued to the eyepiece shield and to the frontal doublet.
The 50 mm doublet of the 20x50 looks very thick. The edge is darkened. The painting used is much harder than that I found on the edge of the MTO's big meniscus.
There was another line of segmented mono, they had a plastic body and were optically similar, but...The eyepiece had a focusing handle all around it (the eyepiece didn't rotate). The relay lenses were much larger even in the 10x30 model, but often I found many scratches, lack of coating and lack of black anodisation on them. Despite that, the mono was sold with a detailed sheet (as the "C" did) in which the eyepiece showed a typical Erfle structure. In fact, it had a nice and neat field stop, what the Plossl in the 20x50 had not. The case was less hard than the "C" branded.
Again, if you read and compare the schematic sheets, under the voice "operating condition", after having translated from Russian, you can clearly put in evidence that the all metal scopes from "C" can work in a wider temperature range than the "lower end" plastic monos...


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Collimator
super member


Reged: 09/05/12

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: laserrain]
      #5434614 - 09/22/12 03:01 PM

Thanks.
I didn't realise that some of these Russian instruction leaflets aren't Russian but Ukranian I think.
I showed one of them to a translator with fluent Russian and she told me it was Ukranian and even with her fluent Russian she had to guess at some words.
I don't know what language the Kazan factory use.

My 12x 20x 40/60 cost $50 new I think. I cannot remember if I found another one after disposing of the one with the terible optical window smearing. They seem to have gone up 7 times in price.
Not only that, the bayonet mount is not foolproof and if you don't lock it properly you end up with half a monocular and a smashed other half.
Soviet/Russian optics are certainly different and I like them a lot. Some places refuse to sell them secondhand I don't know why.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Simon S
Carpal Tunnel
*****

Reged: 01/07/07

Loc: Crawley West Sussex UK
Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Collimator]
      #5434789 - 09/22/12 05:22 PM

Here are a few other good performers
http://www.flickr.com/photos/binoculars/3953881502/in/set-72157623397593828/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/binoculars/3180334218/in/set-72157623397593828/

This 8x30IF is a nice binocular but not a match for some of the best Russia had to offer.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/binoculars/3110679999/in/set-72157623397593828/


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Collimator
super member


Reged: 09/05/12

Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Simon S]
      #5434802 - 09/22/12 05:38 PM

Thanks.
I have a rubber armoured 7 x 30.
I think mine has 7 element eyepieces but I think there was also one with 8 element eyepieces.
I found the view rather strange.
Incredible distortion free eyepieces then rapid changes at the edges.
I cannot remember if mine has a reticle. I must check.
I probably don't have the other two.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Philip Levine
professor emeritus
*****

Reged: 03/22/07

Loc: near Boston, MA
Re: Russian binoculars new [Re: Collimator]
      #5435238 - 09/22/12 11:10 PM Attachment (11 downloads)

Collimator,
I acquired a Komz BPC5 8x30, manufacture date 1982. This was an Ebay purchase from Germany, the Ebay photo showed a slight ding on the right eyepiece prism plate, but I bid anyway. These must have been one of the binos run over by a Soviet Jeep, just to show how durable the binos are.
I think my winning bid was $25, shipping ended up being more.
But... I love these binos, the handholding ergonomics are great, these "disappear" comfortably in my hands. Yes, there is the slight yellow tinge to the view during the daytime, but the image is SHARP, and at night the yellow tinge doesn't show up at all.
Phil

Edited by Philip Levine (09/25/12 09:19 PM)


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | (show all)


Extra information
12 registered and 35 anonymous users are browsing this forum.

Moderator:  Greyhaven, Knuklhdastrnmr, WOBentley 

Print Thread

Forum Permissions
      You cannot start new topics
      You cannot reply to topics
      HTML is disabled
      UBBCode is enabled


Thread views: 7100

Jump to

CN Forums Home


Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics