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la200o
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 09/09/08

Loc: SE Michigan, USA
Re: The Cambridge Photographic Moon Atlas new [Re: desertstars]
      #5474894 - 10/17/12 11:31 AM

Quote:

Quote:

I just got mine and think it's really great! I hope this doesn't cause a major war, but much as I like and use Rukl, I believe I prefer a good photographic atlas.

Bill




No worries. Most of us are bibliophiles and enjoy a good excuse to have an extra lunar atlas. No one book ever really covers it all. (Besides, lunar observers rarely indulge in pedantry. )




(Unlike deep sky observers?)

Bill


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la200o
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 09/09/08

Loc: SE Michigan, USA
Re: The Cambridge Photographic Moon Atlas new [Re: Rick Woods]
      #5474964 - 10/17/12 12:12 PM

Quote:

I can't tell by the table of contents; how much of the near side is actually represented? Is it fairly complete, or cherry-picked features like the Kaguya atlas? Is there enough continuity of coverage to actually be an "atlas"?
The Times Atlas of the Moon didn't cover the entire near side either, but the parts missed were *very* few. Is this one like that?

This looks like a very beautiful book. The price is certainly reasonable.




I don't have it in front of me, but it seems pretty complete; nothing like the nifty but spotty Kaguya Atlas.

Good introductory material as well.

Bill

Edited by la200o (10/17/12 12:13 PM)


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desertstars

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Reged: 11/05/03

Loc: Tucson, AZ
Re: The Cambridge Photographic Moon Atlas new [Re: la200o]
      #5475322 - 10/17/12 03:38 PM

Quote:

Quote:

Quote:

I just got mine and think it's really great! I hope this doesn't cause a major war, but much as I like and use Rukl, I believe I prefer a good photographic atlas.

Bill




No worries. Most of us are bibliophiles and enjoy a good excuse to have an extra lunar atlas. No one book ever really covers it all. (Besides, lunar observers rarely indulge in pedantry. )




(Unlike deep sky observers?)

Bill






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Mare Nectaris
Carpal Tunnel
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Reged: 03/09/08

Loc: Toijala, Finland
Re: The Cambridge Photographic Moon Atlas new [Re: desertstars]
      #5475398 - 10/17/12 04:25 PM

Came on post today

The book is large (25,5 cm x 34,5 cm), so it is rather more suitable for use at indoors than by the telescope.

There are 191 pages and 388 photos. The quality of the photos is very good: fine resolution, unified greyscale, well balanced brightness and contrast to bring out features under different illumination yet maintaining the balance of grayscale. The processing of the photos is natural and smooth, the quality of the print is unified and good. The photos have been taken by Alan Chu (10 Newton), Mario Weigand (11 and 14 Schmidt-Cassegrain) and Wolfgang Paech (6 refractor and 14 Schmidt-Cassegrain). Single photos are also from Michael Theusner (the creator of AviStack) and Wolfgang Sorgenfrey.

The book covers 422 lunar features with an introductory text describing measures, visibility and selenological background.

The features are organized by waxing lunation. There are several photos from a single feature (illumination and also libration when relevant). There is an idex for the first 1-40 features in the beginning of the book, and an index for the features 41-68 at the back of the book. There are no mirror images in the book.

Total of 68 features are covered: Mare Smythii, Mare Crisium, Cleomedes, Endymion, Atlas / Hercules, Montes Taurus, Palus Somnii, Mare Fecunditatis, Langernus / Petavius, Mare Australe, Vlacq, Vallis Rheita, Mare Nectaris, Rupes Altai, Abulfeda, Theophilius, Sinus Asperitatis, Statio Tranquillitatis, Mare Tranquillitatis, Mare Serenitatis, Posidonius, Lacus Mortis, Aristoteles / Eudoxus, Montes Caucasus, Autolycus / Aristillus, Cassini, Montes Alpes, Plato, Montes Teneriffe, Archimedes, Montes Apenninus, Mare Vaporum, Rima Ariadaeus, Rima Hyginus, Sinus Medii, Hipparchus, Ptolemaus, Rupes Recta, Regiomontanus, Maurolycus, South Pole, Clavius, Tycho, Schiller, Palus Epidemiarum, Pitatus, Mare Nubium, Fra Mauro, Mare Cogitum, Mare Insularium, Copernicus, Eratosthenes, Mare Imbrium, Sinus Iridum, Gruithuisen, Mare Frigoris, North Pole, Aristarchus, Kepler, Seleucus, Reiner, Letronne / Hansteen, Gassendi, Mare Humorum, Schickard, Sirsalis, Grimaldi, Mare Orientale. As a bonus there is a NASA photo of the Far Side.

In the beginning of the book there is a 25-page section covering the birth and structure of the moon, selenological basics and types of features. This is based on updated and expanded text of Photographic Moon Book by Alan Chu.

This book is a great, quality resource!

Be well all!


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la200o
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 09/09/08

Loc: SE Michigan, USA
Re: The Cambridge Photographic Moon Atlas new [Re: Mare Nectaris]
      #5475434 - 10/17/12 04:41 PM

Very fine review! I think it may become my favorite moon book.

Bill


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desertstars

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Reged: 11/05/03

Loc: Tucson, AZ
Re: The Cambridge Photographic Moon Atlas new [Re: la200o]
      #5475655 - 10/17/12 06:31 PM

I've been asked for holiday gift idea, recently. This is very timely!

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RobertED
Post Laureate
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Reged: 07/11/03

Loc: Smithfield, RI
Re: The Cambridge Photographic Moon Atlas new [Re: desertstars]
      #5480244 - 10/20/12 11:53 AM

I received my Atlas today!!! (10/20/12) from Amazon. I LOVE IT! It's a very straightforward presentation. The photography is beautiful!!....nice work guys!! My favorite Lunar Atlas was the book put out in the early 1960's......Lunar Atlas by Dinsmore Alter!!!! It very much matches the format!! Did I mention, the photography is beautiful!!!

I highly recommend "The Cambridge Photographic Moon Atlas" to anyone!!!!!!


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jgraham
Postmaster
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Reged: 12/02/04

Loc: Miami Valley Astronomical Soci...
Re: The Cambridge Photographic Moon Atlas new [Re: RobertED]
      #5480598 - 10/20/12 03:32 PM

I really enjoy this book! I like how the authors spend some time with each region and give several different views under different lighting conditions. This makes a very nice companion to a more conventional atlas.

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NeilMac
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 09/25/10

Loc: MedHat, AB, Canada
Re: The Cambridge Photographic Moon Atlas new [Re: desertstars]
      #5485247 - 10/23/12 01:03 PM

Very nice Book

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David A Rodger
professor emeritus


Reged: 08/12/03

Loc: North Vancouver, BC, Canada
An error in The Cambridge Photographic Moon Atlas new [Re: daveCollins]
      #5485990 - 10/23/12 08:21 PM

I just received my copy this afternoon. It is spectacular. But, have I found an error? I turned to 18 Statio Tranquillitatus, which displays the Apollo 11 landing site and craters named for the astronauts. Now look at the photo on the lower half of the page. Towards the right hand side of the photo an arrow points to an object labelled "Apollo 11 command module." I don't know what this is, but it simply can't be the Command module, which remained in orbit about the moon while Armstrong and Aldrin were on the surface.

Now, you might suggest the photographer caught the command module passing over the landing site. If so, that was in 1969. And what do you think the odds were of a lunar photographer on earth catching that moment? Certainly none of the NASA cameras were able to do that.

And were any of the authors even "around" back in 1969? I don't know.

This is a mystery to me. Perhaps some other reader can explain it.

DAR

Edited by David A Rodger (10/23/12 08:49 PM)


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daveCollins
member


Reged: 05/06/11

Loc: Washington DC
Re: An error in The Cambridge Photographic Moon Atlas new [Re: David A Rodger]
      #5486169 - 10/23/12 10:23 PM

It's a thumbnail of the Apollo 11 Command Module placed on the lunar photograph at the approximate location of the landing site. So it is being used as an icon. I am just speculating here, but that is what it looks like to me.

If you look at the other landing sites, they didn't include thumbnails, but instead just point out the landing sites with lines. I guess it was thought that Apollo 11 deserved special attention in the atlas.

By the way, if it were a photograph taken from earth of the command module passing over the surface of the moon, the command module would have to be 2.4km wide! ... See the crater Collins.


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daveCollins
member


Reged: 05/06/11

Loc: Washington DC
Re: An error in The Cambridge Photographic Moon Atlas new [Re: David A Rodger]
      #5493723 - 10/28/12 09:22 PM

Quote:

I just received my copy this afternoon. It is spectacular. But, have I found an error? I turned to 18 Statio Tranquillitatus, which displays the Apollo 11 landing site and craters named for the astronauts. Now look at the photo on the lower half of the page. Towards the right hand side of the photo an arrow points to an object labelled "Apollo 11 command module." I don't know what this is, but it simply can't be the Command module, which remained in orbit about the moon while Armstrong and Aldrin were on the surface.

Now, you might suggest the photographer caught the command module passing over the landing site. If so, that was in 1969. And what do you think the odds were of a lunar photographer on earth catching that moment? Certainly none of the NASA cameras were able to do that.

And were any of the authors even "around" back in 1969? I don't know.

This is a mystery to me. Perhaps some other reader can explain it.

DAR




Wow was I wrong!

David, I have an answer for you which may surprise you ... it definitely surprised me. Plate 18 of the atlas has a picture of the command module over the Apollo 11 landing site. The picture was taken out the window of the Lunar Module (LM: The Eagle) looking back towards the Command Service Module (CSM: Columbia). It just happens to frame the landing site. I ran into this NASA image in some research I've been doing. Along with the image was an explanation of what it was showing.

The atlas gives NASA credit for this image in the back of the book (Page 190 under the heading Image Credits).

By the way, the arrow which points to the landing site is incorrect. The landing site is close to that location. I will be posting a thread to this forum with the correct location and associated pictures as soon as I finish getting everything together.

Edited by daveCollins (10/28/12 09:37 PM)


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David A Rodger
professor emeritus


Reged: 08/12/03

Loc: North Vancouver, BC, Canada
Re: An error in The Cambridge Photographic Moon Atlas new [Re: daveCollins]
      #5494303 - 10/29/12 09:38 AM

Hi, Dave;

I'm a little confused by your explanation. Are you suggesting that either Armstrong or Aldrin took a picture of the Command Service Module (with Collins aboard) from the Lunar Module? Since, as you say, you're getting more information together, you needn't respond at this point. But I am still baffled as to how a photo of the CSM could be taken from anywhere and have it appear against the landing site. But I'll withhold further comment until I see what your research into this oddity provides. I did note, as you did, that this was a NASA photo. But the perspective seems to make no sense. It's as if someone else was in orbit above the CSM with Collins, and took the photo. Weird!

DAR


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David A Rodger
professor emeritus


Reged: 08/12/03

Loc: North Vancouver, BC, Canada
Re: An error in The Cambridge Photographic Moon Atlas new [Re: daveCollins]
      #5494310 - 10/29/12 09:42 AM

Upon further thought, perhaps the photo was taken while both vehicles were in orbit. That occurred both before landing and after take-off from the moon. But for this perspective to be correct, the Lunar Module would have to have been in a higher orbit or trajectory than the Command Service Module. I don't think that occurred, but I could be wrong. Perhaps there was a brief situation where the Lunar Module was higher than the CSM. But I doubt it.

Keep on digging, Dave!

DAR


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RobertED
Post Laureate
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Reged: 07/11/03

Loc: Smithfield, RI
Re: An error in The Cambridge Photographic Moon Atlas new [Re: David A Rodger]
      #5494463 - 10/29/12 11:21 AM Attachment (30 downloads)

It does make perfect sense!! I'm sure, though I haven't done any actual physical research, that both spacecraft did photograph each other during docking and undocking manoevers.I have seen a gorgeous photo taken during the Apollo 17 descent of the CSM about 2 miles away from the LM with the lunar mountains providing an awesome backdrop!!

CSM and Taurus-Littrow landing site
December 10, 1972


http://www.apolloarchive.com/apollo_gallery.html




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RobertED
Post Laureate
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Reged: 07/11/03

Loc: Smithfield, RI
Re: An error in The Cambridge Photographic Moon Atlas new [Re: RobertED]
      #5494484 - 10/29/12 11:35 AM Attachment (29 downloads)

I found the photo in question....not much tech info, but a NASA photo number....a place to start!!..... AS11-37-5447.jpg

http://www.apolloarchive.com/apollo_gallery.html


CSM "Columbia" and Crater Moltke. This view also includes the Apollo 11 landing site, which is just above and to the left of Columbia.CSM from LM


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RobertED
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Reged: 07/11/03

Loc: Smithfield, RI
Re: An error in The Cambridge Photographic Moon Atlas new [Re: RobertED]
      #5494527 - 10/29/12 12:01 PM

https://lpod.wikispaces.com/July+20,+2011

...a brief mention here!!!


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RobertED
Post Laureate
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Reged: 07/11/03

Loc: Smithfield, RI
Re: An error in The Cambridge Photographic Moon Atlas new [Re: RobertED]
      #5494545 - 10/29/12 12:10 PM

AS11-37-5447 (OF300) ( 195k or 1559k )
Command Module over western Sea of Tranquility. Crater Moltke is at the upper left. North is to the right. This view also includes the Apollo 11 landing site, which is just above and to the left of Columbia. Research by Danny Caes. As indicated in a labeled version by Markus Mehring, the Apollo 11 landing site is at the center of the photo, NNW of the CSM and ESE of the Cat's Paw landmark. The sharp-rimmed crater at the lower left edge is Moltke. Hypatia Rille (also known as U.S. 1) extends through the top left corner of the image. The crater directly to the right of the CSM has been named Collins following the Apollo 11 mission. The crater Aldrin is in the top right corner of this image. The third crater named in honor of the Apollo 11 crew, Armstrong, would be to the lower right of this photo and cannot be seen here. During the Apollo 11 mission, the craters Armstrong, Aldrin and Collins were still referred to as Sabine E, D and B respectively, with Sabine C being the crater that forms a triangle with B and D in this photo. Scan courtesy NASA Johnson.


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RobertED
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Reged: 07/11/03

Loc: Smithfield, RI
Re: An error in The Cambridge Photographic Moon Atlas new [Re: RobertED]
      #5494557 - 10/29/12 12:17 PM Attachment (27 downloads)

http://www.hq.nasa.gov/alsj/a11/images11.html

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daveCollins
member


Reged: 05/06/11

Loc: Washington DC
Re: An error in The Cambridge Photographic Moon Atlas new [Re: RobertED]
      #5494579 - 10/29/12 12:35 PM Attachment (24 downloads)

This is a picture taken from the Command Module of the Lunar Module after separation during the Apollo 11 mission. As you can see, the moon isn't in the background. So it is entirely conceivable that during the separation maneuver, the Command Module was between the Lunar Module and the Moon.

Photo - NASA AS11-44-6598 obtained from Here.


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