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Sarkikos
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Re: New Edition of Uranometria 2000 new [Re: Daniel Mounsey]
      #5570390 - 12/14/12 07:12 AM

Daniel,

RED EYES

Red Eyes doesn't look dark enough. Look at the photo showing Red Eyes filter over the iPad and iPhone. I can still see non-red colors bleeding through! Not too good.

Also read this ad copy from the Red Eyes site:

"Unlike other darker red films, and less transparent Rubylith products, this lighter shade of red is the perfect transparency."

Nope, Red Eyes lets through too much light and too many colors for dark sky observing. It should only show a dim red. IME & IMO, they don't know what they're talking about.

Mike


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Sarkikos
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Re: New Edition of Uranometria 2000 new [Re: Sarkikos]
      #5570408 - 12/14/12 07:26 AM

How do I plan my dark sky sessions? I already have an observing list set up on Sky Safari Pro for each constellation. Each list contains DSO I've never seen before and that are possible to be seen with my 10" Dob. During the night, I use the constellation lists to go through each constellation as it presents itself. Easy sneezy. Best method I've found yet. I can locate and observe 30 or more "new" DSO in a good night ... if I want to.

I don't even use goto or DSCs. I don't need them. I use Sky Safari Pro, a Telrad and a closely-aligned 70mm optical finder.

Mike


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Dave Ittner
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Re: New Edition of Uranometria 2000 new [Re: Sarkikos]
      #5570566 - 12/14/12 10:05 AM

Quote:

How do I plan my dark sky sessions? I already have an observing list set up on Sky Safari Pro for each constellation. Each list contains DSO I've never seen before and that are possible to be seen with my 10" Dob. During the night, I use the constellation lists to go through each constellation as it presents itself. Easy sneezy. Best method I've found yet. I can locate and observe 30 or more "new" DSO in a good night ... if I want to.

I don't even use goto or DSCs. I don't need them. I use Sky Safari Pro, a Telrad and a closely-aligned 70mm optical finder.

Mike




This makes a lot of sense. Constellation mopping so to speak. I know it can be a bit time consuming to create an observing list but heck that's what cloudy nights are for right?

I love printed atlases - all of them. And will one day have purchased all of them if not most.

But am getting better at using SF Pro on an IPAD at the eyepiece. Once I get the IPAD mounted on a swing arm that is attached to a stalk I will upload a picture. Of course I also plan to hook up a dew heater strip to the IPAD as well.


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Sarkikos
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Re: New Edition of Uranometria 2000 new [Re: Dave Ittner]
      #5570783 - 12/14/12 12:32 PM

Dave,

Quote:

This makes a lot of sense. Constellation mopping so to speak. I know it can be a bit time consuming to create an observing list but heck that's what cloudy nights are for right?




I'm always open to trying new methods, but so far this works best for me. I already have a DSO spreadsheet I've put together from various lists, and filtered out all the DSO that are too dim for my 10" Dob. It includes a column that I check off when I've bagged an object. It's a simple matter to sort the list in "Not Seen"/Constellation/NGC/Other Objects order. From this information I create Constellation lists by hand within Sky Safari Pro.

I've recently acquired Astro Planner which can export lists in SSP format. That should make the whole process easier.

IME & IMO, creating a list for each constellation will probably make more sense to many observers than RA order. Most people are visually and verbally oriented, not so much numerically. When I'm at the dark site, the first thing I look for are constellations and bright stars. I'm not thinking about RA or Dec. Now, sorting the objects within a constellation list in RA order might be useful, especially for long constellations such as Hydra.

Mike


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Dave Ittner
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Re: New Edition of Uranometria 2000 new [Re: Sarkikos]
      #5571052 - 12/14/12 03:43 PM

Astro Planner looks pretty similar to that of Deepsky 2000
http://www.deepsky2000.com/

I had a ton of observations in that software but on a computer that crashed.

Either software package is a great way to create lists that can be exported to SSP but also keep track of what you have observed to date.


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Starman1
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Re: New Edition of Uranometria 2000 new [Re: Sarkikos]
      #5571066 - 12/14/12 04:02 PM

Quote:

Dave,

Quote:

This makes a lot of sense. Constellation mopping so to speak. I know it can be a bit time consuming to create an observing list but heck that's what cloudy nights are for right?




I'm always open to trying new methods, but so far this works best for me. I already have a DSO spreadsheet I've put together from various lists, and filtered out all the DSO that are too dim for my 10" Dob. It includes a column that I check off when I've bagged an object. It's a simple matter to sort the list in "Not Seen"/Constellation/NGC/Other Objects order. From this information I create Constellation lists by hand within Sky Safari Pro.

I've recently acquired Astro Planner which can export lists in SSP format. That should make the whole process easier.

IME & IMO, creating a list for each constellation will probably make more sense to many observers than RA order. Most people are visually and verbally oriented, not so much numerically. When I'm at the dark site, the first thing I look for are constellations and bright stars. I'm not thinking about RA or Dec. Now, sorting the objects within a constellation list in RA order might be useful, especially for long constellations such as Hydra.

Mike



My big observing list (over 20,000 objects, a lot of which are blank), which always goes to the field with me, is arranged by Constellation>>RA>>Numerical order (often the same as RA).
i start out with a constellation, then view the constellation from west to east to allow for the passage of time while observing.


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Starman1
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Re: New Edition of Uranometria 2000 new [Re: Starman1]
      #5571069 - 12/14/12 04:04 PM

I'll put in a plug for Deep Sky Planner 6 when it comes to pre-arranging an observing session.

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Rick Woods
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Re: New Edition of Uranometria 2000 new [Re: Starman1]
      #5571095 - 12/14/12 04:20 PM

It's interesting, the different needs and preferences of different folks at the eyepiece. I have no interest at all in charting software. Paging through a printed atlas, and comparing star fields on a page with those in the eyepiece, is an integral part of the experience for me. I was raised in a very bookish environment, and books are important to me.

I just hope there are enough people who feel as I do that printed atlases will continue to be published, and we'll all continue to be able to get the tools we each prefer!


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Daniel Mounsey
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Re: New Edition of Uranometria 2000 new [Re: Rick Woods]
      #5571245 - 12/14/12 06:06 PM

I'm with you there Rick. The only thing where I would add mention though is with regard to Uranometria. There's no way I would be shuffling through its pages in the dark. It's much more efficient to simply put stick tabs in the pages you plan to go to rather than trying to shuffle through some RA DEC numbers in the book. That's like trying to do a messier marathon with Uranometria on the fly. You'd go nuts!

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Rick Woods
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Re: New Edition of Uranometria 2000 new [Re: Daniel Mounsey]
      #5571838 - 12/15/12 12:28 AM

Quote:

I'm with you there Rick. The only thing where I would add mention though is with regard to Uranometria. There's no way I would be shuffling through its pages in the dark. It's much more efficient to simply put stick tabs in the pages you plan to go to rather than trying to shuffle through some RA DEC numbers in the book. That's like trying to do a messier marathon with Uranometria on the fly. You'd go nuts!




Well, sure, it's much more efficient if you know what you want to look at ahead of time. Unfortunately, I rarely do that, and end up shuffling in the dark. That's why I like SA2000 the best, usually.


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Sarkikos
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Re: New Edition of Uranometria 2000 new [Re: Starman1]
      #5573188 - 12/15/12 08:46 PM

Don,

Quote:

My big observing list (over 20,000 objects, a lot of which are blank), which always goes to the field with me, is arranged by Constellation>>RA>>Numerical order (often the same as RA).
i start out with a constellation, then view the constellation from west to east to allow for the passage of time while observing.




My "big" list contains only about 2500 DSO ... brighter skies and smaller aperture. And no double stars, of course. (In any case, are doubles really deep sky objects? Well, maybe deep sky but not dark sky. )

Yep, listing by constellation and then west to east by RA does seem the most practical way to go about it. It's only a bother if you have a long list and want to look up some NGC numbers quickly within that list. But you can always resort a spreadsheet. I wish that SkySafari would let you sort an observing list on-the-fly. I've suggested that to Southern Skies. Maybe in the next upgrade ...

Mike


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Rick Woods
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Re: New Edition of Uranometria 2000 new [Re: Rick Woods]
      #5573189 - 12/15/12 08:46 PM

Here's a question: Does the Deep Sky Field Guide still index correctly to the one-volume U2K?

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Sarkikos
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Re: New Edition of Uranometria 2000 new [Re: Rick Woods]
      #5573203 - 12/15/12 08:55 PM

Rick,

Quote:

Paging through a printed atlas, and comparing star fields on a page with those in the eyepiece, is an integral part of the experience for me. I was raised in a very bookish environment, and books are important to me.




I do the same thing with SkySafari on my tablet ... except for the part about paging through. I have nothing against books. The last time I bothered to count them, I had over 4000. That was about five years ago. Lately, though, I have started to give some away. Hardly a day goes by when I don't think about which ones I should let go.

Well, I guess I do have something against books: they take up a lot of space at home and are not so good for star hopping at my dark site.


Mike


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Rick Woods
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Re: New Edition of Uranometria 2000 new [Re: Sarkikos]
      #5573519 - 12/16/12 01:33 AM

Well, there's no right and no wrong here. Just preferences.

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desertstars

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Re: New Edition of Uranometria 2000 new [Re: Rick Woods]
      #5573782 - 12/16/12 09:20 AM

Quote:

Well, there's no right and no wrong here. Just preferences.




You know, you just summed up about 95% of the discussions found on Cloudy Nights.

Among other places...


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Jeff Morgan
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Re: New Edition of Uranometria 2000 new [Re: Dave Ittner]
      #5574060 - 12/16/12 12:03 PM

Quote:


This makes a lot of sense. Constellation mopping so to speak. I know it can be a bit time consuming to create an observing list but heck that's what cloudy nights are for right?




Actually, it can be kind of quick with Astroplanner. The only issue is keeping the size of the lists to a manageable number. For example, in Ursa Minor there are about 440 DSO's within the (theoretical) range of a 16" scope. (As you might have guessed, most are galaxies towards the limit of that aperture.) And the Washington Double Star catalog adds a comparable number of targets. To keep my lists to a size I like (around 50 targets) here is the Astroplanner procedure:

1) Select the DSO catalogs you're interested in (omit the double stars for now) in the Search Catalogs pop-up.

2) In the search parameters dialog chose the scope you have defined, the constellation, and then give it a declination band or range. For example, declination 84 00 00 to 89 59 59. Expanding or contracting the declination band within the constellation boundaries is the primary way to manage the number of entries on your list. One could also restrict object type, size, or magnitude if a night of pushing theoretical limits doesn't appeal to you. The options in Astroplanner are amazing. After running the search, add the results to your observing list. Astroplanner will ask if want to omit duplicate entries (and the answer is Yes).

3) Go back to the Search Catalogs pop-up and select your desired double star catalogs. The reason I do this as a separate screen is to tightly control the doubles list to the kinds I find most pleasing, the WDS catalog is truly immense and can overwhelm you. And quite frankly, a lot of them don't "look like" doubles. So I specify a separation range (0.5 to 30 arc seconds) and a component magnitude range (A component 10 and B component 12). Note that if I tried to use these limits on a DSO search, lots of targets wouldn't make the cut hence the two search method for a single list.

4) After running that search, add the results to the first search. Omit duplicate entries again.

5) Now sort the combined observing list in a manner that makes sense to you. Since my scope has GOTO capability (or will have if I finish the ServoCat installation this week ) and the focuser is on the left side, I sort by decreasing RA then decreasing DEC. This always keeps the slews small and always moving away from me and the ladder.

6) Export the result to SkySafari.

The result is that I have a number of individual plans per constellation, such as Ursa Minor 1, Ursa Minor 2, etc. ready to go in SkySafari.

And it is indeed enjoyable to do this on a cloudy night with a hot mocha or adult beverage and check the results against Uranometria.


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Sarkikos
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Re: New Edition of Uranometria 2000 new [Re: Jeff Morgan]
      #5574114 - 12/16/12 12:49 PM

Jeff,

Thanks for this useful advice about Astoplanner. I've just recently acquired this program and am still learning to set up lists with it.

Another way to limit objects within a constellation list, would be to limit the type of object. I'm thinking about setting up different lists for each constellation based on the best type of objects to observe given a specific night's transparency/seeing conditions.

For instance, it would not make sense to look for faint galaxies or "bright"/dark nebulae on a night that is not very transparent. On those nights, it'd probably be better to be locating and oserving open clusters. That's exactly what I did in practice during my last trip to a dark site. The night was not very transparent, so I limited my searches mostly to open clusters, though I did find some galaxies, too. (21 "new" objects total before the sky clouded over, including 15 OCs and 6 galaxies - no goto or DSCs.)

Mike

Edited by Sarkikos (12/16/12 12:52 PM)


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alintolea
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Re: New Edition of Uranometria 2000 new [Re: faackanders2]
      #5658488 - 02/02/13 04:49 PM

In regards to dimmer lights.. I put a piece of masking tape over the lens of the Celestron flashlight. Besides dimming the light to very acceptable levels, it makes it very diffuse, and much more pleasant to use.

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rinalmj
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Re: New Edition of Uranometria 2000 new [Re: alintolea]
      #5690709 - 02/20/13 11:51 AM

Does anyone have pictures of the new edition that you could share? I've been looking into buying this but pictures on the internet are very scarce.

I'd also be interested to hear general impressions (in addition to those given above) specific to the new edition.

A couple specific concerns that I have are:

1. How does the physical format work? Is the binding good? Does it stay open when you turn to a page? Do the charts fold-out?

2. Given the large volume of information, how crowded do the charts look?


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okieav8r
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Re: New Edition of Uranometria 2000 new [Re: rinalmj]
      #5690737 - 02/20/13 12:05 PM

Quote:

Does anyone have pictures of the new edition that you could share? I've been looking into buying this but pictures on the internet are very scarce.

I'd also be interested to hear general impressions (in addition to those given above) specific to the new edition.

A couple specific concerns that I have are:

1. How does the physical format work? Is the binding good? Does it stay open when you turn to a page? Do the charts fold-out?

2. Given the large volume of information, how crowded do the charts look?




This is from the publisher's website. Hope it's what you're looking for.

The bindings in books published by Willman-Bell, at least the ones I've bought, are of excellent quality that will last many years. They make them to endure a lot of use.



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