Return to the Cloudy Nights Telescope Reviews home pageAstronomics discounts for Cloudy Nights members
· Get a Cloudy Nights T-Shirt · Submit a Review / Article

Click here if you are having trouble logging into the forums

Privacy Policy | Please read our Terms of Service | Signup and Troubleshooting FAQ | Problems? PM a Red or a Green Gu… uh, User

Speciality Forums >> Science! Astronomy & Space Exploration, and Others

Pages: 1 | 2 | (show all)
deSitter
Still in Old School


Reged: 12/09/04

Re: Discoveries made by Amateur-astronomers new [Re: PhilCo126]
      #5273290 - 06/15/12 05:25 PM

There is available to the amateur these days, powerful enough equipment to do real work, essential work, such as quasar surveys. A big Dob and a spectroscope and lots of patience are all that is needed. The big professional scopes do not have time for this. In particular, quasar censuses in the neighborhoods of active galaxies are critically needed.

-drl


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
great lesson
sage


Reged: 04/04/10

Loc: Canada
Re: Discoveries made by Amateur-astronomers new [Re: deSitter]
      #5273401 - 06/15/12 06:33 PM

Quote:

There is available to the amateur these days, powerful enough equipment to do real work, essential work, such as quasar surveys. A big Dob and a spectroscope and lots of patience are all that is needed. The big professional scopes do not have time for this. In particular, quasar censuses in the neighborhoods of active galaxies are critically needed.

-drl




I just starting reading "redshifts, cosomolgy, and academic science " by Halton Arp. That is the message that I am getting from the book - more looking is needed and if the professional can't do it then let the amateurs take a crack at it


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
GlennLeDrew
Postmaster
*****

Reged: 06/18/08

Loc: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Re: Discoveries made by Amateur-astronomers new [Re: great lesson]
      #5276410 - 06/18/12 12:29 AM

In '98-'99 I found several open cluster candidates using 10X50 binos. I used the Hipparcos and Tycho data to construct color-magnitude diagrams and examine commonality of proper motions. These objects are listed in Archinal and Hynes' book, Star Clusters. Not long after I stumbled on these groups, Bruno Alessi found nearly all of the same ones after systematically searching the entire Tycho catalog, and subsequently published a paper in A&A. At that time I was preparing a paper of my own, regarding what is now officially known as Alessi 1.

This group is virtually certainly a true cluster, and fairly old at about 1 billion years. Of the 6 red giant candidates, 4 have essentially identical radial velocity, as measured by astronomer David Latham. (I was introduced to Latham by the referee who reviewed the first draft of my paper.) The other 2 are somewhat discrepant, but this could be due to binarity.

I noted that this group had a position on the sky, distance, proper motions and age that suggested that it could be related to the cluster NGC 752. Assuming the two groups were born from the same cloud complex, and utilizing the epicycle approximation of Galactic orbits, I predicted the then unknown radial velocity, which a couple of years later was the very value Latham measured. Of course, this could still be coincidental, but I *feel* the possibility of coevality is perhaps better than even.

One of the cluster candidates, in Vulpecula and not far from the Veil nebula on the sky, can be seen with the unaided eye in a dark sky.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
JKoelman
professor emeritus


Reged: 05/16/11

Loc: Bangalore, India
Re: Discoveries made by Amateur-astronomers new [Re: GlennLeDrew]
      #5276481 - 06/18/12 01:39 AM

Quote:

Not long after I stumbled on these groups, Bruno Alessi found nearly all of the same ones after systematically searching the entire Tycho catalog, and subsequently published a paper in A&A. At that time I was preparing a paper of my own, regarding what is now officially known as Alessi 1.



Sometimes life is unfair! Did you still get your paper published? Can you maybe share a link?


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
GlennLeDrew
Postmaster
*****

Reged: 06/18/08

Loc: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Re: Discoveries made by Amateur-astronomers new [Re: JKoelman]
      #5276570 - 06/18/12 04:14 AM

Johannes,
The paper (which I titled, "Discovery of an Old Open Cluster in Cassiopeia", didn't get far. The first draft was rejected, the referee suggesting that I obtain radial velocity measurements to buttress my case, hence the introduction to Dr. Latham. I should have re-worked it in spite of having been 'scooped.' The original version resides on one of my older computers as a Word doc, and has not been uploaded anywhere on the web.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
JKoelman
professor emeritus


Reged: 05/16/11

Loc: Bangalore, India
Re: Discoveries made by Amateur-astronomers new [Re: GlennLeDrew]
      #5278079 - 06/19/12 12:23 AM

Some quick googling reveals there is still some justice... ("Object: Alessi 1 / LeDrew 1")

In any case it is great to hear that even these days a serious amateur with a simple binocular can still make astronomy discoveries.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
PhilCo126
Post Laureate


Reged: 01/14/05

Loc: coastline of Belgium
Re: Discoveries made by Amateur-astronomers new [Re: JKoelman]
      #5334740 - 07/25/12 12:53 PM

Hanny Van Arkel's interesting website: http://www.hannysvoorwerp.com/

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
PhilCo126
Post Laureate


Reged: 01/14/05

Loc: coastline of Belgium
Re: Discoveries made by Amateur-astronomers new [Re: PhilCo126]
      #5481653 - 10/21/12 09:57 AM

Exoplanet PH1 ( Planet Hunters 1 ) was discovered by volunteers Kian Jek of San Francisco - CA and Robert Gagliano of Cottonwood - AZ as they spotted the dimming in the lightcurve using the citizen science online PlanetHunters project. PH1 orbits a 4-star system:
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/kepler/multimedia/images/ExoUpClose.html


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Mister T
Pooh-Bah


Reged: 02/01/08

Loc: Upstate NY
Re: Discoveries made by Amateur-astronomers new [Re: PhilCo126]
      #5482353 - 10/21/12 05:17 PM

orbiting in a 4 star system...

I wonder what the analemma for those suns would look like on that planet


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
PhilCo126
Post Laureate


Reged: 01/14/05

Loc: coastline of Belgium
Re: Discoveries made by Amateur-astronomers [Re: PhilCo126]
      #5533899 - 11/22/12 12:45 PM

Amateur astronomer Tom Boles discovered his 150th supernova from his personal observatory at Coddenham, Suffolk in Great Britain.

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
PhilCo126
Post Laureate


Reged: 01/14/05

Loc: coastline of Belgium
Re: Discoveries made by Amateur-astronomers new [Re: PhilCo126]
      #5668836 - 02/08/13 11:54 AM

Of course we can't forget the Comet-chasers:
http://www.cometchaser.de/discoverystories/Comet-discoverers.html


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
PhilCo126
Post Laureate


Reged: 01/14/05

Loc: coastline of Belgium
Re: Discoveries made by Amateur-astronomers new [Re: PhilCo126]
      #5721948 - 03/09/13 10:17 AM

Excellent documentary on amateur-astronomers
Time Shift Star Men
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HxPLBMygJeY


RefractorPhill


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
ColoHank
Carpal Tunnel
*****

Reged: 06/07/07

Loc: western Colorado
Re: Discoveries made by Amateur-astronomers new [Re: PhilCo126]
      #5722084 - 03/09/13 11:18 AM

How about that Italian amateur, Galileo Galilei? Credit him at least with discovering the phases of Venus, Jupiter's four largest satellites, a variety of features on the Moon, and the progression of sunspots on the rotating Sun. I made a functional replica of a Galileo scope in 2010, one fitted with store-bought and no doubt more precise and better optics, and I think it's a miracle that he was able to discover anything at all with the primitive instruments he fabricated in the early 17th century.

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Pages: 1 | 2 | (show all)


Extra information
1 registered and 5 anonymous users are browsing this forum.

Moderator:  LivingNDixie, FirstSight, JayinUT 

Print Thread

Forum Permissions
      You cannot start new topics
      You cannot reply to topics
      HTML is disabled
      UBBCode is enabled


Thread views: 4155

Jump to

CN Forums Home


Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics