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Equipment Discussions >> Binoculars

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Simon S
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Reged: 01/07/07

Loc: Crawley West Sussex UK
Viewing Jupiter through binoculars
      #5590818 - 12/27/12 08:17 AM

I spent some time last night viewing Jupiter through breaks in the cloud with the Celestron 25x100.
As the planet shines so brightly, it is impossible to make out and detail such as cloud bands. To reduce the light, shall I mask the objectives or fit a ND filter?


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rydberg
scholastic sledgehammer
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Reged: 02/25/04

Loc: Richmond, KY, USA
Re: Viewing Jupiter through binoculars new [Re: Simon S]
      #5590845 - 12/27/12 08:51 AM

I'd do both: a mask would cut down aberrations from optics edge and a ND filter would cut down glare.
Marco


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Andresin150
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Reged: 08/14/07

Loc: Bogotá - La Calera / Colombia
Re: Viewing Jupiter through binoculars new [Re: rydberg]
      #5590874 - 12/27/12 09:18 AM

Clouds help me filter Júpiter, but I can see details (seb, neb and a third thiny band N) without masking... At 3.75mm exit pupil (40x150), a similar exit pupil size of a 25x100.... Maybe because of the extra magnification...

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Tony Flanders
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Reged: 05/18/06

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Re: Viewing Jupiter through binoculars new [Re: Simon S]
      #5590889 - 12/27/12 09:36 AM

I recommend making masks. It's incredibly easy to do using cardboard from something like a cereal box.

The biggest benefit is reducing the aberrations of your own eye, which for most people are whopping huge at a 4-mm exit pupil.

Even so, 25X is mighty low power for viewing Jupiter. You should be able to see the two main cloud bands -- barely -- but not much else. At the moment, a third band (North Temperate) is abnormally bold, so you might see that as well.

As I've said many times, a cheap department store telescope beats binoculars hands down for viewing the planets -- though not much else.


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Simon S
Carpal Tunnel
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Reged: 01/07/07

Loc: Crawley West Sussex UK
Re: Viewing Jupiter through binoculars new [Re: Tony Flanders]
      #5591145 - 12/27/12 12:46 PM

Thanks everyone I will try that.
Tony, I have a cheap scope will try that tonight.
Thanks very much.


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planetmalc
sage


Reged: 10/21/09

Re: Viewing Jupiter through binoculars new [Re: Tony Flanders]
      #5591191 - 12/27/12 01:15 PM

Quote:

I recommend making masks. It's incredibly easy to do using cardboard from something like a cereal box.




Or cut a hole in a piece of black polythene and rubber-band it onto the lens hood.


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SMark
scholastic sledgehammer
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Reged: 08/29/11

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Re: Viewing Jupiter through binoculars new [Re: planetmalc]
      #5591474 - 12/27/12 05:04 PM

I was just out comparing my new 30x80 with my 25x100, and on Jupiter the 30x80 did a much better job. The brightness was overwhelming with the 25x100 and so little detail could be seen. The 30x80 was much clearer and the image settled down such that the main cloud belts were much more obvious.

I would definitely recommend an exit pupil of 3mm or less.


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faackanders2
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Reged: 03/28/11

Re: Viewing Jupiter through binoculars new [Re: Simon S]
      #5591908 - 12/27/12 10:27 PM

Did anyone get to view it yesterday near the moon and Hyades?

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GlennLeDrew
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Reged: 06/18/08

Loc: Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
Re: Viewing Jupiter through binoculars new [Re: faackanders2]
      #5591940 - 12/27/12 10:58 PM

On a 25X100, a 50mm mask will deliver a fairly decent 2mm exit pupil. You could even get down to near 1mm (25mm or so aperture) to good effect.

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Andresin150
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Reged: 08/14/07

Loc: Bogotá - La Calera / Colombia
Re: Viewing Jupiter through binoculars new [Re: faackanders2]
      #5592842 - 12/28/12 03:15 PM Attachment (34 downloads)

Yes! I took a picture with the iPhone with the Docters 40x.
Júpiter was not easy and its moons dont appear in the image. Without our moon, Júpiter moons are easy to image...
That night also IO was casting a shadow over Júpiter, but that was not seen in the Docters, but very easy in a friends small 80mm Apo at 62x IIRC...


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Pinewood
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Reged: 12/07/04

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Jupiter's moons new [Re: Andresin150]
      #5595348 - 12/29/12 11:49 PM

Hello all,

Friday night, I returned home with Jupiter rising. I took a quick look with a 12x50, on a monopod. Of course, I did not see any detail on the planet but I was rewarded with four moons.

Clear skies,
Arthur


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Simon S
Carpal Tunnel
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Reged: 01/07/07

Loc: Crawley West Sussex UK
Re: Jupiter's moons new [Re: Pinewood]
      #5595871 - 12/30/12 10:46 AM

I too was viewing last night. The four moons are easy to spot despite one being very close to the planet. I am on holiday at the moment so have not had a chance to make up a mask. Optics seem quite good though.

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BobinKy
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Re: Viewing Jupiter through binoculars new [Re: Simon S]
      #5596267 - 12/30/12 02:32 PM

Quote:

I spent some time last night viewing Jupiter through breaks in the cloud with the Celestron 25x100.
As the planet shines so brightly, it is impossible to make out and detail such as cloud bands. To reduce the light, shall I mask the objectives or fit a ND filter?




Many years ago, EdZ suggested an easy solution to overly-bright views of the Moon or Jupiter with giant binoculars -- observe with the porch light on, so the eyes would not completely dark adapt. I tried this and it works.


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