Return to the Cloudy Nights Telescope Reviews home pageAstronomics discounts for Cloudy Nights members
· Get a Cloudy Nights T-Shirt · Submit a Review / Article

Click here if you are having trouble logging into the forums

Privacy Policy | Please read our Terms of Service | Signup and Troubleshooting FAQ | Problems? PM a Red or a Green Gu… uh, User

Equipment Discussions >> Binoculars

Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | (show all)
wky46
Carpal Tunnel
*****

Reged: 12/12/05

Loc: west Ky.
Re: Any other mounts besides a parallelogram? new [Re: Mr. Bill]
      #5667640 - 02/07/13 06:40 PM

I've never viewed with a mirror, but the design has always intrigued me. I may just rig something a little more crude than yours with the materials I have on hand. Thanks for the inspiration.... Phil

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
faackanders2
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 03/28/11

Re: Any other mounts besides a parallelogram? new [Re: faackanders2]
      #5672218 - 02/10/13 11:53 AM

Quote:

Just got my order of:
Manfrotto Magic Arm w/ Camera bracket
Manfrotto 035RL Super Clamp w/Standard Stud(for 25x100 binos)
Barska Binocular Tripod adapter (2ea for smaller binos)
$145.60 free shipping

Below freezing temps and cloudy outside. So I decided to set up inside on my zero gravity chair. Everything set up easy, but the majic arm clamp was harder to do than I expected. It probably would work great with my 9&15x63 Orion Mini Giants (but since I already have a garrett pivoting pistol grip monopod, my main interest was the 25x100s which I have never been able to use at zenith with comfort).

As mentioned above the standard stud was needed for the 25x100 vertical post. The 10lb weight of the binos is too much for horizontal viewing with 25x100s (the ball joint pivot will hold hold position canterlevered out horizontally with such a moment arm. However I am marginally able to look vertical with the 25x100, since I only have to hold up a fraction of the 10 lbs weight above my eyes (and my forehead/face can also support the reduced effective weight (with no risk of getting black eyes like hand holding without any support which I attempted once 2 minutes for the North American one summer ). So I think I will be able to look at the zenith with my 25x100 on a clear night (and then I'll try the easier 9&15x63 and smaller binos. Should be real comfortable for the relatively static "comet of the century". But the Orion paralleogram (which I returned) would probably have worked better for 9&15x63mm and smaller binos.




Used the Manfrotto Arm on with 25x100 binos and my zero gravity chair to look ar M42, Jupiter, and M45. It was basically a 3 handed operation. 2 hands required to hold 10 lb binos in place, and one to rotate the lock lever 180 degrees under alot of tension. Since I don't have 3 hands (or another helper), I had to hold binos with one hand and the lever in the other, and hence I got exhausted after 10 minutes, and never really able to lock in the desired position (but I did get close within a few degrees. The majic arm did provide some weight assist, but overall the mount was too wobbly under the 10 lb weight, and the image was way too shaky. Collimation of the binos got off with all the weard movements, and awkward to push tubes in and out to reallign while holding up above my eyes. The cold, thick clothing, and gloves didn't help either. I may try this once agian with my 25x100 in the summer with the Viel and North American.

However the next time I test the manfrotto arm it will be with my lighter 2.3lb 9&15x63mm Orion minigiant binos.

The arm appeared to be steady with binos removed. I kept the gravity chair in the garage, but easily removed the manfrotto arm to store inside since the warning label said not in the cold. Removing the arm from the chair was easier than removing the 25x100 binos from the arm, but this was my first time using it outside in the cold.

Question - If I was able to try first, would I still buy it. No, but I will not return it since it appears to look good for my other binos and camera. My garret monopod works best standing, and not so well when seated or lying down in the gravity free chair.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
faackanders2
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 03/28/11

Re: Any other mounts besides a parallelogram? new [Re: Mr. Bill]
      #5672227 - 02/10/13 11:59 AM

At one time I thought about getting the mirror system fro my 25x100 binos, but I believe it was $500 and where I observe I get lots of dew and/or ice so I thought it would not be very usable with an exposed flat surface (and for that money a UT parallelogram would be better in the non term).

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
wky46
Carpal Tunnel
*****

Reged: 12/12/05

Loc: west Ky.
Re: Any other mounts besides a parallelogram? new [Re: faackanders2]
      #5672304 - 02/10/13 12:42 PM

My experience with the Magic Arm clamped to a lawn chair holding my 10x50's was that it seemed the arm just isn't long enough to fully articulate. And to re-adjust the position of the arm, one has to contort in an uncomfortable position to loosen or tighten the lever. I haven't tried, but I would think that even with the Magic Arm clamped to a tripod next to the chair, at 18.5" fully extended there wouldn't be enough length to operate effectively (again, I haven't tried). I'm gonna make it work though with the Magic Arm clamped to a PVC extension off the tripod to add some length and have it infront of me instead of clamped behind me. I tried it clamped to a microphone boom stand but unfortunately, the mic boom could not hold the weight.... Phil

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Mr. Bill
Postmaster
*****

Reged: 02/09/05

Loc: Northeastern Cal
Re: Any other mounts besides a parallelogram? new [Re: faackanders2]
      #5672306 - 02/10/13 12:42 PM Attachment (20 downloads)

Quote:

At one time I thought about getting the mirror system fro my 25x100 binos, but I believe it was $500 and where I observe I get lots of dew and/or ice so I thought it would not be very usable with an exposed flat surface (and for that money a UT parallelogram would be better in the non term).




I agree with your reasoning...the largest binocular that can be used without vignetting with my setup would be 80mm.

Also, dewing would definitely be a problem in cold, damp weather. I live in the high desert so dew is generally not an issue.



Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Ain Soph Aur
professor emeritus
*****

Reged: 08/11/11

Loc: West Tennessee
Re: Any other mounts besides a parallelogram? new [Re: Mr. Bill]
      #5673047 - 02/10/13 08:53 PM

I recently built a Peterson Engineering EZ Binoc Mount and it is absolutely fantastic. Easy to use standing, sitting or reclined. I painted it and it stays out in the backyard.

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
guangtou
sage


Reged: 03/27/10

Re: Any other mounts besides a parallelogram? new [Re: Ain Soph Aur]
      #5673481 - 02/11/13 04:29 AM Attachment (30 downloads)

I also have the Peterson Pipe mount and love it. Handles my 11# binocs wonderfully and is easy to use.

Edited by guangtou (02/11/13 04:32 AM)


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
eklf
Pooh-Bah
*****

Reged: 05/12/07

Loc: Carrboro, NC
Re: Any other mounts besides a parallelogram? new [Re: guangtou]
      #5673809 - 02/11/13 10:42 AM

How is the damping time for the Peterson mount? 'looks like it would sway in the slightest wind?

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
guangtou
sage


Reged: 03/27/10

Re: Any other mounts besides a parallelogram? new [Re: eklf]
      #5673842 - 02/11/13 11:08 AM

The damping time will be longer than it would be mounted on a tripod but not objectionable by any means. It is a lot more stable than it looks and I have used mine for over 2 years now. The key is achieving the correct balance with the counterweights. The only downside I find is that it isn't very portable. To that end I bought a heavy duty tripod and panhead. However, after the peterson I can hardly stand to use the binocs on the tripod.

Edited by guangtou (02/11/13 11:11 AM)


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
eklf
Pooh-Bah
*****

Reged: 05/12/07

Loc: Carrboro, NC
Re: Any other mounts besides a parallelogram? new [Re: guangtou]
      #5673891 - 02/11/13 11:35 AM

That is good to know. I really like the simplicity of the unit. The price is right too.

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
wky46
Carpal Tunnel
*****

Reged: 12/12/05

Loc: west Ky.
Re: Any other mounts besides a parallelogram? new [Re: guangtou]
      #5674048 - 02/11/13 01:15 PM

Thanks! I'll check into it .....Phil

Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Ain Soph Aur
professor emeritus
*****

Reged: 08/11/11

Loc: West Tennessee
Re: Any other mounts besides a parallelogram? new [Re: eklf]
      #5674721 - 02/11/13 08:03 PM

I've only used the EZ Binoc mount with my 10x50 Pentax so far, and the mount is incredibly smooth and stable in my experience. As Guangtou mentions, balance is key.

I am looking forward to trying it out with 100mm binocs eventually, and also planning on building a second one to leave at my parents house. It can be a bit expensive depending on how much you have to pay for the steel pipe and fittings, and lapping the threads can be a bit messy.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
faackanders2
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 03/28/11

Re: Any other mounts besides a parallelogram? new [Re: guangtou]
      #5674820 - 02/11/13 09:15 PM

HOW MUCH IS THE PETERSON PIPE mOUNT?

Unfortunately my back yard is small with alot of trees.
I observe from my driveway, front yard, and remote sites about 20min away.

I like the UT 6 DOF sytem to use with my zero gravity chair. But I know it would be very expensive (and more than the 25x100mm binos themselves).

P.S. I also have asperations of potentially owning a 150mm bino 90 deg version, but believe these would be limited to tripod mounting, so they would not be a factor in parallelogram/pipe mount system selection.


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Gordon Rayner
Carpal Tunnel
*****

Reged: 03/24/07

Re: Any other mounts besides a parallelogram? new [Re: faackanders2]
      #5674910 - 02/11/13 10:20 PM

Who makes the "UT 6 Degrees of Freedom system"?

Are those Azimuth 1, Azimuth 2 ( the hinge or elbow), pitch, yaw, roll ? That is five degrees. What is the sixth? Is that the up-down movement provided by the parallelogram mechanism?


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
faackanders2
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 03/28/11

Re: Any other mounts besides a parallelogram? new [Re: Gordon Rayner]
      #5676629 - 02/12/13 09:34 PM

Quote:

Who makes the "UT 6 Degrees of Freedom system"?

Are those Aximuth 1, Azimuth 2 ( the hinge or elbow), pitch, yaw, roll ? That is five degrees. What is the sixth? Is that the up-down movement provided by the parallelogram mechanism?




Universal Astronomics

"Besides making night sky observation much more comfortable, a parallelgram mount gives a big range of eyepiece height without adjusting the tripod- and without loss of target (ideal for sharing the view with kids). Universal Astronomics manufactures the finest parallelogram-type mounts on the market, and they are 100% made in the USA. The basic Unimount features 4 degrees of motion, and up to 6 degrees of motion can be achieved with the addition of the Ultra-Swing Hinge and Deluxe L Adapter. Even with all those pivot points, there is virtually zero slop or backlash. While observing the night sky, you'll feel like the mount is not even there. Because all axis' are in perfect balance, the binocular simply "floats", while you effortlessly point it in any direction. For the ultimate in comfort, try it with a reclining lawn chair (Ultra-Swing option recommended). Six degrees of motion allows viewing almost the entire sky without moving your chair!
Comes with 10 lbs. of counterweight, so it will balance binoculars as large as the Oberwerk 25x100IF. Bottom-mount binoculars attach directly to the included dovetail base. For those with a narrow IPD (inter-pupillary distance), the standard dovetail should be upgraded to the "riser dovetail", which adds clearance so minimum IPD can be achieved without interference with the binocular's objective tubes. For binoculars that have a tripod adapter socket on the front of the body, order the Deluxe L Adapter. If you prefer an L adapter that does not swivel, choose the Oberwerk Heavy-Duty L Adapter. Need a tripod? The Oberwerk Wood Tripod is perfect for this mount.


4 to 6 degrees of motion (depending on options)
All bearings are teflon-lined
Max. Load: 10 lbs."

I thought they had a longer heavier version for 25x100 binos from a reclining zero gravity chair, but couldn't find it in my brief search.

Ken


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
faackanders2
Carpal Tunnel


Reged: 03/28/11

Re: Any other mounts besides a parallelogram? new [Re: faackanders2]
      #5708614 - 03/02/13 11:27 AM

Quote:

Quote:

Just got my order of:
Manfrotto Magic Arm w/ Camera bracket
Manfrotto 035RL Super Clamp w/Standard Stud(for 25x100 binos)
Barska Binocular Tripod adapter (2ea for smaller binos)
$145.60 free shipping

Below freezing temps and cloudy outside. So I decided to set up inside on my zero gravity chair. Everything set up easy, but the majic arm clamp was harder to do than I expected. It probably would work great with my 9&15x63 Orion Mini Giants (but since I already have a garrett pivoting pistol grip monopod, my main interest was the 25x100s which I have never been able to use at zenith with comfort).

As mentioned above the standard stud was needed for the 25x100 vertical post. The 10lb weight of the binos is too much for horizontal viewing with 25x100s (the ball joint pivot will hold hold position canterlevered out horizontally with such a moment arm. However I am marginally able to look vertical with the 25x100, since I only have to hold up a fraction of the 10 lbs weight above my eyes (and my forehead/face can also support the reduced effective weight (with no risk of getting black eyes like hand holding without any support which I attempted once 2 minutes for the North American one summer ). So I think I will be able to look at the zenith with my 25x100 on a clear night (and then I'll try the easier 9&15x63 and smaller binos. Should be real comfortable for the relatively static "comet of the century". But the Orion paralleogram (which I returned) would probably have worked better for 9&15x63mm and smaller binos.




Used the Manfrotto Arm on with 25x100 binos and my zero gravity chair to look ar M42, Jupiter, and M45. It was basically a 3 handed operation. 2 hands required to hold 10 lb binos in place, and one to rotate the lock lever 180 degrees under alot of tension. Since I don't have 3 hands (or another helper), I had to hold binos with one hand and the lever in the other, and hence I got exhausted after 10 minutes, and never really able to lock in the desired position (but I did get close within a few degrees. The majic arm did provide some weight assist, but overall the mount was too wobbly under the 10 lb weight, and the image was way too shaky. Collimation of the binos got off with all the weard movements, and awkward to push tubes in and out to reallign while holding up above my eyes. The cold, thick clothing, and gloves didn't help either. I may try this once agian with my 25x100 in the summer with the Viel and North American.

However the next time I test the manfrotto arm it will be with my lighter 2.3lb 9&15x63mm Orion minigiant binos.

The arm appeared to be steady with binos removed. I kept the gravity chair in the garage, but easily removed the manfrotto arm to store inside since the warning label said not in the cold. Removing the arm from the chair was easier than removing the 25x100 binos from the arm, but this was my first time using it outside in the cold.

Question - If I was able to try first, would I still buy it. No, but I will not return it since it appears to look good for my other binos and camera. My garret monopod works best standing, and not so well when seated or lying down in the gravity free chair.




On 2/25/26 from 10-12PM in shadow (of my house) of the rising full moon, I evaluated the manfrotto majic arm on my zero gravity chair with both 2.3 lb Orion Mini Giant 9x63 and 15x63 binos. This time the arm was failry steady with the lighter weight. The 180 deg arm locking devise involved uncomfotatale contortion of your body/arm and required excessive force, but the long steady vews were worth it. I looked at M42, M45, Jupiter with part of the Hyades, and briefly (unlocked) at M36/M38 in same view near zenith. I did want to look at the latter longer, but with these dim objects (of the full moon shadow sky background), I lost the objects every time I locked the arm with 3 attempts. The brighter objects were easier to keep in view while locking the arm (or tweaking it after to get back in central view). The manfrotto arm is good for long steady views of few objects. I am more a quick view of finding lots of objects observer, so I still prefer the Garrett pistol grip monopod. The garrett monopod with quick connect/disconnect also allowed for much easier swapping of the binos than the manfrotto arm. The first time I swapped binos with the amfrotto arm I remained seated, and it was dificult alligning the bracket with the blind hole of the bracket; so the rest of the time I snaked out behind the system and swapped binos from the front and then snaked back in. The object remained pretty close to the same FOV while interchanging binos, and I did not have to release and relock the arm. For these (and lighter binos) the manfrotto arm works well and I can finally look at the zenith comfortly and steady. Can't wait for summer with North American and Viel to give these and my 25x100 one more try.

P.S. I also evaluated 10 new colored filters from Meade sale ($40) along with skyglow, ultrablock, OIII, Orion Mars, Denk planet, and Televue Bandmate Mars-B on both Jupiter and the full moon with 17.5" f4.1 and Denk II binoviewers and Multiplier OCS with the MH (no additional lenses) and LL, LM, ML dual powerswith modes. For the most part I had the Bandmate Mars B filter in the left eye swapping out the other filters in the right eye (what is in the right eye does shift perceived color of left eye pulling to the right eye color). In general Jupiter looked better in lighter color filters, and the full moon looked best in the darker colors. Best filter for Jupiter showing most bands was 82A very light blue and 11 yellow green. I preferred the cooling blue effect of the moon with 38A dark blue and 47 Violet. Note Violet was so dark I could harly see Jupiter, and although they advertise this for Venus, it may just work for the bright full moon (and I have a 17.5" dob!). Skyglow, Bandmate Mars B also were close runner ups for Jupiter. It was a fun warm(er) winter night requiring no facemask


Post Extras: Print Post   Remind Me!   Notify Moderator  
Pages: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | (show all)


Extra information
7 registered and 23 anonymous users are browsing this forum.

Moderator:  Knuklhdastrnmr, WOBentley 

Print Thread

Forum Permissions
      You cannot start new topics
      You cannot reply to topics
      HTML is disabled
      UBBCode is enabled


Thread views: 6663

Jump to

CN Forums Home


Cloudy Nights LLC
Cloudy Nights Sponsor: Astronomics